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Full text of "FOIA: Hoover, J. Edgar-Masters of Deceit-46"

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November 29, 1962 






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folson -p _ 
Belmont «u. 

Casper .m. 
CallGhan ^ 
Conrad .^^ 
Xfopoach *s. 
Evans «_• 



296 Piedmont^Road 
"XTdlumbtis 14,* Ohid_ 



Dear Miss 



Your letter postmarked November 26th has 
beeri received and I -want to thank you for your kind' comments"*! 
concerning '!Masjers of Eteceit." It is certamly encouraging m 
toknow of your interest in. learning all you can about commit-* 
nism and your desire to fight this menace to our country. *-"* 

Enclosed is some literature I hope will, assist* 
you in your study o£ this atheistic philosophy. - Perhaps you "will 
also want to refer to my hew book, "A Study of Communism, «•■ 
which traces the history of communism since its inception and 
contrasts it with our American freedoms; This book should be 
available at your local public library. 

Sincerely yours, 

■ *" I " -ttrEtfaar Hoover '- 



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Enclosures (5) 

See enclosures arid NOTE next page 



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Enclosures ( 

Communism and The Knowledge To Combat Itt 

Young People Can Help Defeat Communism. 

Time of Testing 

Communism and the College Student 

The Communist Pstrty Line 



NOT£f: Correspondent canhqt.be identified in,.Bufiles, 



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296 Piedmont Road 
Columbus 14, Ohio 



Mr. J* Edgar Hoover 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

V/ashington D* C* 







Mr., Hoover 

I am a senior at Bishop Watterson ^igh School* For the past 
two months my p # O.D. class has taken a very thorougffQs tudy \ of 
Communism* This study has been based on your bo ok r ~18 ASTERS X)F_ 
'DECBIT^^^j: am writing this letter to tell you how much* I* 

;ed from this book. I knetw of Communism, and I realized 
that it was a dangerous threat. However, after having read 
your book, I admit that actually I knew very little of the 
Party, its maneuvers, and results. I was literally shocked 
by some of the facts and statistics which were given. I have 
always thought of Communism as a rather abstract thing. But 
now I see it as a concrete opponent of all that I believe in, 
and all that this great democracy stands for. However, the 
most valuable knowledge I have gained is --how to combat Com- 
munism. 

1 1 do not intend to stop my study of Communism v/ith just this 
[one book, however. Quite the contrary, MASTERS OF DECEIT * ha 

aroused my interest, and has made me inquisitive^JT this, our 

most terrible enemy. 

I have recommend your book to ail of my friends, my parents, , ftf| 
and relatives. I fell that everyone should be required to read ^||| 
it in school. Because as you said, the best way to fight 
Communism is to know Communism. 



SinggrgjlY 










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'■AT**' 

December ?, 1962 



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Anthony, Kansas,, 



Dear Mr, 



Your letter of November 2§th, with enclosure,, was 
received during Mr. Hoover's absence. You may be certain your 
communication will be brought to his attention when he returns. 
However, I would like to point out that as a matter of policy, 
Mr. fioover has refrained from commenting on any plans such as 
you outlined. You may want to contact your local, postmaster ior 
information regarding postage. 

* Under separate cpver, your book is being returned 
jtogether with some material it is hoped will be of interest to you. 



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COMN'FQI 



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Sincerely yours. 



Helen W, Gandy 
Secretary- 




1 >. Mr. Engelmeier - .4724 (Sent Direct) 
USe Material 

Bjook correspondent enclosed 

An Army Of Free Men 
1 ' Internal Security Statement, 4-1-7-62 




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Directors 1^-0*6$ imerican Legion 1 Speech' 
Shaiiitt Be Law or Tyranny"? 1$-* $ i W £$ SI 
Why Reds Make.Friends withJBusinessmen 
NOTE: CorresponderiUeannot Be identified iifcBgfil^s, He submitted a 
paperback ediftfctbSf ^Masters of T>eceim~W£§ffimfflii&date appearing 
inside the cover has ijeeirretainedv 



TaJe. Rooa . 
Gandy 



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ANTHONY, KANSAS 



Nov. 25, 1962. 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover:- 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Sir:- 

I am sending you one of your books with an idea 
that is self explanatory on the inside of the 
cover. 

I am sending this to you for any suggestions 
for improvment you might make. Especially in 
the T rr3,te up ♦ 

Will tlje page for readers to sign their names 
m ^ke it necessary to add 40 for /writing enclosed. 

Would also like to have your idea of the this 

scheme to get the book read. Has it been tried 

before? 

If this idea is a success I would like to send 

out quite a number of these books. 

Thanking you for an cooperation you can give 
me, I remain 

Yours sincerely, 




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Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 

Mr. JCWper 

Mr. Callahan 
Mr^<^n*a*l .*rw 

M^Evans 

Mr. Gale^. 

Mr. Rosen.- 

Mr. Sullivan — 
Mr. Tavel _^« 

Mr. Trotter 

Tele. Room.,- — 
Miss Ehlmss. — 
Miss Gandy. — 







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• Ds.\a EBLLai Americans e^rmhere^ * . ■* 

':lhat can one private individual do 
tJo fi^ht communism? . # 

For onlv 100 vou can send this book 
anywhere in the U.S. to wh'ere you think 
it would do the most good. 
If "or some reason you can not read the 
whole book 1 -urge you to^at least read 
fr^m t>a^e l&L on..-, ". -"t 
It is'nnly necessary, to put on a new 
iddre~.s label and postage and justssnap 
the ru ber bands around it. 



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If you would like to start one < 
more of these books in circulation 
•nd irend me 60£ each with the name 
| t hirers t r > whom you would like to 
J roc i ve it and I will wrap it and f;end 
^vit rm its way. ' 

1\ If you do not care to send this 
]\ ~, .him 't to me and I'll refund yo 



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TELEPHONE 251 



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FD-36(R©v. 12-13-56) 




FBI 



Date: 12-7-62 



Transmit the following in . 
AIRTEL 



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(Type in plain text or code) 

AIR MAIL 



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(Priority or Method of Mailing) 




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Mr. »r „ JfeC 
Mr^. Ga w *v^r_ JMv 



Fvans -_«^. 

"Mr- CW** ._ .=_ 

Mr- B$£ 

Mr. Sui 

Mr. 

Mr. TroU«aw~ 

Tele. Room^™ 

Miss Hohnes.** 

Miss Gandy,^^ 



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TO 

PROM 
"SUBJECT: 



DIRECTOR, FBI 

SAC, LOS ANGELES. (62- 

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^RADIO NEWSCASTER - STATION. KGER 



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i JOTRTBEACH, CALIFORNIA 
INFORMATION CONCERNING 



Above captioned telephonically contacted 
the Los Angeles Office this date and stated that 
on next Tuesday morning (12-11-62) he planned to 
appear before the Long Beach City Council and read 
a paper prepared by him charging that, officers of 
thejJ Dong. Beach Pu blic _Libja£y- have deliberately 
anppWaaPd .1. E lifflnTTfOoy ER ' a books by not making 
them available.. I [ stated he would call for the. 

I removal of the library officials involved. I 1 
remarked that he had been in recent communication 
with the Director and had received a letter from him. 




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]was specifically reminded that this 



Bureau could not take any position on his proposed 
action. aHd that any such action as he took would be a 
matter of his own decision. For the information 
of* the, Bureau, it was discreetly ascertained this date 
4hat thj Director 's.bookS/ ^asters of Deceit" and 

h 5"A Study of, pommunism" are presently available 

j^gln t)ie v Wi:njpong Beach City library. 




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- Los Angeles if* 



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Agent in C^nar^e 



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£iiAsj of the Los Angeles Office 
Jis a strong supporter of the 



reflect that, , „ . w _„„ 

Bureau and a staunch admirer of the leadership 
of the Director, By letter dated 11-29-62 
the Bureau acknowledged his letter of 11-24-62 
and enclosed some . literature . By letter dated 
2*25-60 entitled "BOOK ENTITLED 'RUMOR « FEAR ,- 
MADNESS OP CROWDS' by J. P. CHAPLIN/ professor 
of Psychiatry* Vermont Uniyeraih3d!_fche Loi Angeles 
Office advised the Bureau, of I I opinion 
concerning this book as being critical df the FBI. 

Th£ above is furnished for the Bureau's 
information. The Bureau will be kept advised of* 
any pertinent developments. 



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December 12, 1962 



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lou urcnard LAne 
^esterville," Ohio 



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Dear 



I received your letter of December 5th, 
with enclosure, and appreciate your interest in bringing 
this matter to my attention.- 

Sincerely yours, 

& Edfear Hooker 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director 



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NOTE: | Correspondent, has written cordially in the past. In IfciMter 
dated 7}r9^60 she commended the Director for "Masters of Deceit" 
and identified herself and her husband as members of the John Siren 
Society. It is noted that it is common practice in connection with ' 
paperback books to insert advertising of the type enclosed for other 
publications .orbpoks. 



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ri^^O^Q^jjrELETyPH UNIT CI 








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OFFICE OF DIRECTOR 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

100 Orchard La 
Westerville O. 
Dec. 5, 1962 

Dear Mr. Hoover, 

Imagine my surprise when, 
while working (as a volunteer) in 
the Freedom Book Store, I found 
the enclosed insert i*Khe new 
editions of your booif^Mas ters of 
Deceit." 






MR. BELMONT 
MR. MOHR 



MR. CASPER 



MR. CALLAHAN 
MR. CONRAD 
MR. OELOAC 
MR. EVANS - 
MR. GALE 




MR. ROSEN 



MR. SULLIVAN 
MR. TAVEL 



MR. TROTTER 
MR. JONES 



TELE. ROOM . 
MISS HOLMES 



MRS. METCALF 



MISS GANDY 

u 



I cannot conceive that you would havgsgiven 
lyour permission for this so — how can tliey get 
away with Jit? 



-Cr* 



Hope you have time to give this matter some 
attention. It seems paradoxical and shSiild not 
go unchallenged. 






^l jggg Highest respect, and regards, 



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HAVE TIME DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME 
EVERY WEEK FOR LESS THAN 80 AN ISSUE 



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Mila, Ore; 
D e <r Toth, 62; 




JVEdger Hoover ** of the: F^BJE- 
Washington) DJ3- 
Dear* Sirr 



Mr, 
Mr 
Mr 
Mr. 
Mr. Caiia^a 

Mr. <ty2&r~z, 

Mr. Ev-ns — - I 

Mr. G* — 

Mr. Jtoi^n— 
Mr. E'i - *a« 
Mr. Ta,e!„ 
Mr. Trotur- 
Tele. Room-. 



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Miss ELhnes- 
Miss Gandy— 



OS 



Tarn starting tb read your fc book £ "Masters: Of % Decei^)/ *^: you disagree" 
withC The r s ecret* Government* Of^TKe United*" States )"? TKeiirversibn^ of* How* Gomuaism 
started seems* too disagree^ with yours* buttmabfjr l£ I Knewr what, is: in your* secret" fil 
itf would* be? different*. 

Oner question- X have* ? considered' arcing you for- sometime^ is: thisv 

Diet you ever* haver a 5 dream result ih solving a crime? 5 
When- r talk^ aboui£ dreams: tb^ the? polices Kere> they just laugh attf mev 
** tbld r them^ that X bet. that? i'fT writer tb' Mir gbover^he: can: teHl me^ that* dreams* 
Have helped? solver cramesv I would* especially like* you tb answer^ this- question 
if it is: not. tbo much bother; 



There 1 rs: another L question that r would; like^ to get* your advicer on». /^ 

x have^ a* placer that rhomsteaded ih 1927 anew therer isr a* bunch of outlaws' in herei 




'j^j ^hat* sabotage? everything on the? place- and* haver managed! tb: Keep me*f£om doing anything *s 
ijUi S | amount: tb anything sence? r gott ther place -^ >^ n£Q. 9 /^O -/# Yp?*/7 ~~ J\y 



Sow that, *V tfiffc^ Broke* Her* -arnrand T am Herev alone? they are-, trying to sabotage** mev 
Bbth because* of my nightly dreams' and also* because- of*" the? arigant defiant^ wa^^Kmg? 



IV 



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act* X idShrthey arrer plotting tb 'dirmev. 



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r/ £ They do all kindsr of outlawery and: I, cant get the polices tb do a? things 



-s! \ % Thev: came out and'tbld 
^ on* rcrooks'^lbuti. sense:- then 



f54 



; me*tHa-frth'ey do all ther detective? work tb; get? th*er good's* ^! 
Ken all they db Isr show-me* ajbged *$Lmev _ - , £~f 



fy the? Hundreds*- or thousands* over a* yeaffs-*|j^e^dhcF. it, dbnt dp* 
^ . /l^^ C 

me any good tb report them,. In fact that?, 'is; why th^vcrooks* are* plotting go: kill 



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Mernow* 

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They < actuzally came here? tb Kill me* one* night butt* managed tb: get rid of them*. 

The* intensive* way thatfthey are trying to^ i^ame me; notr ; wont last long If they 
have? their- way * , 

T have* perfect faith in gouy, and" the? fact that 1 he? always: warns: me; so X can avcfi r tniir 
trapsr isr ther only' reason Tarn still alive.* 

My luck' might* run out", because? T wont* run from them and* they try to ant&gonlze- me^ 
every day into doing something foolish butl 1 wont cooperate*; >J 

T Know *< can' depend- on God' but: X think he-* expects- things^ to be> solved' An a 
materrlal way* I- think he* just* helps^ out until necessary action is* taken* 

They dcr ail kinds- of outlawery and I? anr postive^ that: If * a? real smart* detective? 

gets after them; long enough and' smooth enough he can unearth evidence* of 
interstate^ opperations such as^ deer- celling maby moonshi'ning and w selling gold 4 on the 
black market. 

One^ -was reported as t Y akihg 25" lbs* of gold to Cali fornia about 2 months ago for 

alegdly illegal sale* 



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It, is; the- reasonable* thing tb expeot of them. Bo> < 37, fo il 1 6 0&Z&A 
He- mined' with a cat and it Is* reasonable- that: he could 1 just /tbout had 25 lbs* 
T feal that when a bunch' of gangsters- show a.homsteader a bad time an& try to 

destroy him or ^chase^ hinr out one 5 way or~ another they are* by interf earing 

with a homsxeader chalenging the 1 government 1 as much as* they are Him*. 

I feal that 5 the^- Government atleast has ar moral obligation to take severe action 
against crooks that try tb prove that they arer stronger than the U.S.. G overnment # , 

Is* it atall possible- for-you tb put a good detective^ in here- to get the good's on 
these crooks that: are^ trying to prove* that, .gangsterism is stronger than the government 
and get thdnr out* of here^ once and for 4 all* If they get* away with their flouting of 

b6 

Tjrs*, laws* you know that, goes a long way in promoting Gomimism. b7c 



hope* you do something abnuj-it* 



Routing Slip 

0-7 (Rev* 4-6*62) 

TO: -SAC, 

\ — \ Albany 

I I "Albuquerque 
r \ Anchorage 
n Atlanta 
|~1 Baltimore 
1 | Birmingham 
(~1 Boston 
f~l Buffalo 
m Butte 

B Charlotte 
Chicago 
a Cincinnati 
Cleveland 
n Dallas 
I I Denver 
I — 1 Detroit 

8 El Paso 
Honolulu 



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RE: 



(Copies to Offices Checked) 



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rH Houston 

I I Indianapolis 
f~l Jacksonville 
I | Kansas City 
I 1 Knoxvllle 
I 1 Las Vegas 
j 1 Little Rock 
I 1 Los Angeles 
f~l Louisville 

S Memphis 
Miami 
f~l Milwaukee 
n Minneapolis 
f~l Mobile 
1 I Newark 
I | New Haven 

BNew Orleans 
New York City, 




forfolk 

)klahoma City 
| | Omaha 
fT Philadelphia 
rn Phoenix 
r^l Pittsburgh 
gx] Portland 
rn Richmond 
i I St. Louis 

Salt Lake City 

San Antonio 

San Diego 

San Francisco 
£3 San Juan 
f~1 Savannah 
f~l Seattle 

B Springfield 
Tampa* 

12-14-62 



I 1 Washington Field 
( | Quantico 



TO LEGAT: 

Bern 

Bonn 
f \ London 
Q Madrid 
rTManlia 

Mexico, D. F. 

Ottawa 

Paris 

Rome 
HI Rio de Janeiro 
a Tokyo 



BOX 37 

MILO, OREGON 



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Q For information (X] For appropriate action Q Surep, by ^ 

,Q The enclosed Is for your information. If used in a future report, □ conceal* 
all sources;""* r"H paraphrase contents. 

f — [ Enclosed are*corrected pages from report of SA ■ 

dated 



Remarks: Attached are two copies of a self- 

explanatory communication. Make available to the 
appropriate local law enforcement agency the informa- 
tion pertaining to the attempt to kill correspondent* 
The Bureau is acknowledging this letter ^informing 
correspondent no FBI jurisdiction and that a copy of 
his letter is being referred to Secret Service and 
Alcohol Tax Division* 



Enclosure(s) \f*J 

Buflle 

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STATE OF 








DELAWARE 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

DOVER 
SECONDARY EDUCATION 



HOWARD E.,ROW 
Assistant Superintendent 



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December p, t 1962# 



Mr. Tolson. 
Mr, JSelmont 
Mr* Mohr^ 
Mr. Casper, 
I T r. Wahan, 
Mr. Coj 
J'r. 
Mr. Evans, 



"F* 




Mr. lfr»RMi 

Mr. Sullivan. 

Mr. TaveL* _. 

Mr, Trotter 1. 

Tele. Hoom 



Miss Holmes. 
MissN 



J. R T/ 



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Mr .7 J. Edgar Hoover 

federal Bureau of Investigation^ 

Washington, p. ;C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover:,-, 



This letter is written, to^seek permission to 
quote, a number of lines, from your bool£ "Masters of Deceit ". 

The State bf Delaware, Department, of Public 
Instruction J is '.preparing w guide for teachers who will 
teach about Communism in the public schools of this state* 
A state-wide committee has been organised for over a year 
to conduct a ^study prior- to the preparation of this 1 document. 

In a sub-chapter under * the title "The Responsibility 
of the Individual to ^Combat Commuhism 1 ^ we wish to quote the 
following : excerpts from "Masters of Deceit ! 1 , page 290:- 

"Be alert (and well-enough informed J/Ho^ spot, 
expose, arid oppose Communist efforts j B"TJT 
LEAVE' SPY-HUNTING TO THE FBI, which has been 
given the job by the, President, the Congress, 
and the Attorney General. J". Edgar 'Hoover, 
FBI Director, points out that 'Hysteria- witch 
hunts, and vigilantes weaken our internal 

security we must be absolutely certain 

that our fight is iraged with full regard for 
the historic liberties of this great nation. 
This is the fundamental promise of any attack | •-. 
against communism . ♦ ♦ . Smears, character } ^ 
assassination, and the scattering of irresponsible £J 
charges have no place in this nation; They create k 
division, suspicion, and distrust among loyal ^ J 
Americans - just what the Communists want— and ^ 
hinder rather than aid the fight against Communism!^ •, 

fo-a^-'' " S DEC 1^962 





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Page No* 2 

J. Edgar Hoover 






> -December 6, 1962. 



>/ 
The committee will be most ^appreciative if you Y 

find it appropriate to allow the quotation as here presented, 

In the 1 event "that you wish to know more about the context of 

the entire document, we ,would be able to. supply you with -a 

loan copy of our ^manuscript priqr„to the time that it goes 

to the printer* 



Sincerely yours, 



^4oi#iuu^- ^ ^ v: ^^ 



Howard E. Row 
Asst* State Supti , Secondary Education 
Chairman, Committee for the Study of 
Materials .to Teach About Communism 
HERtskk. 



"V 



if 






— I 



2-11-62 



To: 
From: 



SAG, Baltimore 



Director, FBI 
HOWARD E/%OW 

assistant $tjj^mmmsit$ 



RESEARCH (CRIME RECORDS) 
BtJDED 12-17-62 r , , 




Attached is a letter from captioned Individual -which is 
seif-explanatOry. You are Instructed to make discreet inquiries of 
established, sources to determine reputation and character of captioned 
individual. Under no circumstances should lie become -awa^e of yduV 



•,j 



."-» 
..»« 



.toUon -i. 
Bolmont _ 
Modi ,.-.-.—. 
Caspetf -l- 
Callahan . 
Coniad'^i. 
DeLoach -. 
Evans ._ 
Gale — _ 



,;"' 'rU your inquiry reflects that Xfow is reputable,. -you should 

- I contact him and advise him that I have no objection to his quoting the ~ ''•■ 

I excerpts from /♦Masters of Deceit" as set forth in his letter oJl2-6-02*j 
; | with the: understanding that this in no way constitutes an, endorsement faff 
_ f the material bqing prepared by the committee. He should |>e ©vised fhat 

.. he musj-Talso eqntact the publishers, Holt, ;Rinehart and Winston, Inc. r 

J 383 ^Jadfisbn Avenue, New York 17, tfew York, for their permission to 

* use fchls material. 

% < &}S r When contacting Bow you should -mention that 1 liaye written 

new ljpok, on communism entitled/VA Study of Communism,** which may 
" interest to him in connection with his program. 

P. 1 " , ■ 

tel of the results of your 




Please advise the y&ire&u 'DjTafrf 
contact with Row no later than 12-17-62. 



Enclosures (2) , 4 ' „ n 

JL -jFoUowrup made for 1^-17^62. 



^NOTE: 



di 



-*)44 




Neither Row nor the Sfea$e\of Delaware^ -Department of Public Instruction, 

is identifiable in Bufiles. It, is felt that we. -should have the Baltimore Office contajS 

h im,^ after making^dMcreet inquiny*- regarding his reputation, and advise him thafl 

^3t«ma* ec ^^^g^MjUction to the use of quotes irom "Masters of Deceit." It is*[ 

t that .tms^woulq be an excellent opportunity of bringing to his attention e* J] 

&*&?<iLf*'. - JJote continued on second page 



Rosens 
Sullivan 

Tavel. «. 

Tele. Room ?»■»■--> n.i-.w- 4 

Holmes .r..,; ajVAtmajS , 

Gondy ^-T^nr MAU, #& 



an 



&ETYPE ^NIT 1 




1 ^t 1 *! 



** ■ • • 6 

'^C/ rtel td SAC > Baltimore 
ifer HOWARD E, SMITH 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT- 
STATE OF DELAWARE 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

the Director's new book. "A Study of Communism." Upon receipt of SAC, 
Baltimore' s reply, we will advise Holt, Rihehart and Winston, Inc. , of 
Row's request. 



-2- 








f-119 



r 



•7*^ 



1 



ToUcn 
Beluont 3- 

Moht 



JDccombOr 19, 1002 



iJtorijZSS*} 



r 

Miss| 

Manager 

Subsidiary Rights Department 

Holt, Rinefaart and Winofon, Inc.. 

383 Madison Avenue 

Now York 17, Now York 



Dear Mot 




X am enclosing a copy ol a letter rocclved by 
Mr. Hoover from Mr. Howard E. Row of Dover, Delaware. 
V/e are advising Mr. How that wo have no objection to his 
quoting the excerpt sot forth from ^Masters of Deceit and 
ar£ asking him to contact your firm also for the necessary 
permission. 

Sincerely yours, 




b6 

b7C 



Clyde Tolson 




Cj^ 




Enclosure «*? 

1-BaJfcimoigo v -j ^ 

NOTSSoRowhas requested to usfe an excerpt from "Masters of: Deceit** for 



$1^ ^ ^ 



^educational material for Delaware Schools. sAu Baltimore was instructed to 



^ rj^c enduct discreet inquiry on Row, and if he. was found to be reliable, to advise 
Qw^ I_ t ,_4 iitai that we have no objection to his using this excerpt and that he should contact 
DeLoad* — ^ th& jmlflisher. SAC Baltimore was also instructed to mention "A Study of 
^C6inmurii^m^;to/Mm. 

n "**'/ " jsac Baltimore has advised that discreefc inquiry^of eflects that Row 



DeLcacn, 

Evan* 

Gale 

Sulhvan 

^ av * : ■• r „ . 

wTitoi'iLis verv renutatffeV He was to be available for .contact on 12^18-62 at which time 
ST—^^^mra &^te&£P 2 f „ the f ov ^r * ife ffelt T sh *? d wr i? e h< S&a^SS ^ 

* ^*^ and Winctnn Tnr» reorarriincr this matter. .TVAtkmd to) 




and Winston, Inc., regarding this matter. JVA:^mg_(6) 



FD-36 (Rev., 12-13-56) 



o 



o 



FBI 



Transmit the following in 
Vin AIRTEL 



Date: 12/17/62 
PLAIN TEXT 



(Type in plain text or code) 

REGULAR MAIL 



(Priority or Method of Mailing) 



TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

FROM: SAC, BAEP IMORE (9^-382) 

SUBJECT: HOWARD E^ROW 

.JUssistant Superintendent - 
JSi^tb^jr^elaWre^ *- ' 

Department 6T j^bjlic^Ins,fecuc 
RESEARCH \ CRIME RECORDS) 
Buded: 12/17/62 







Re Bureau airtel to Baltimore, 12/11/62. 



V 






foecexsf 



I 



b7D 



I and 

Delaware State Police, 

Dover, Delaware, established sources, advised Dr. ROW is a 
reputable person who has a responsible position with the 
Delaware Department of Public Instruction. FERGUSON, who is 
a member of a committee for the study of materials to teach 
communism, of which Dr. ROW is chairman, and WATSON advised 
ROW is chairman of a committee which is developing a course 
for study of communism, particularly in regards to advantages 
of a democratic form of government and evils of communism, 
in public schools in Delaware. They know of nothing reflecting 
unfavorably on Dr. ROW, who has been with the Delaware Depart?- 
ment of Public Instruction for about seven or eight years. 

Efforts to contact Dr. ROW revealed he will not be available 
until 12/18/62, at which time he will be contacted in 
accordance with re Bureau airtel, and the Bureau will be 
advised. 



% 



\Jly Bureau 
iT- Baltimore 



^ «&-/'W7'&fc 



<& 






.#* 






8 DEC 18 1962 





** 



Approved: 



Special Agent in ttarge 



Sent 



** OPnOHAl fOKM MO, 10 



Memoranda 



UNITED STATES ■ GOVfiJSJJ^JSW 1 



£SS^ l 



TO 



^' 



FROM 





,. .Jo. 



subject: 



date: December 14;. 1962 




Trotter , 



Tele. Room , 
Holmes _ 
Gandy _ 



is 



While at the Bethe sdax* -Naval Medi cal Center 'this* morning-- 
I overheard a conversation *6 fl [ who is a Bureau' employee 

h andling the Agents who receiv e physical examinations at the Hospital. 



of the Hospital was expressing her views to Mr.[ 



]_an employee, of t he Plastic Surgery Clinic 



]. She said 



what we need is Mr. Hoover for President and then we wouldn't have to 

worry about Cuba, and some* of these- other things that come up all the 

time. SheV 

and now the, 

book,. "Masters of Deceit. " She said above all, the things she wants, 

she would like very much to have an autographed copy of this book. 



.said she; read the .Director's last book,. "A Study, of Communism, u\\^ 
e, onlything she would.like would be a copy of the Director's t 

esters 'of Tlpir***!* V She sniH ahfttw nil the thin ore eh« wonfe , . \ 



b6 

b7C 

i 



She. is in the Clinic which has been. most helpful to the Bureau. 



SB 



y Special 
He is," 



This, Clinic ; has beehvhandlihg;the:case:of^ 

Agent, who has been in the Bethesda Hospital tor over a year, 
suffering from p.anf>.fer of fhp throat anH this section has also handled 

Special Agent WhOihadio have plastic surgery 

after a serious hahd.accident. 






, [was. not. %'aken; from her original ppsitioh desiring 

to have a copy of the Director's lx>dk, "Masters of Deceit'v autographed 



^ and Lhave obtained a.copy of it. 



CO 



.VI •. 






.RECOMMENDATlbN: 



In 



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view of the^siriceritypf her request and the fact that she v ^ 
couldn't be stirred irfifierWiews^bne iota, I would like to suggest fifiat £ 
if at all possible,, the attached copy be autographed to her by theSDirector. 

' r tp is b*«« 

this isTk pprovedj I would. also like to suggest that 

| who is in daily contact with officials at the Bethesda 

that 



Enclosure 



Hospital, present this to her on behalf of the Director. I am sure- ths 
it^bifldlg fffggly^ appreciated. . \ j% Gz^&ggi2^%t$ 

mm £3 



ARrers 
(4) 




XEROX 



pt%¥& CEOT 





CH , 








;."'*** 




December 20, 196£ 



Jt± 



2K21Bt. Pa ul Street 



Dear Mr. 



, - *~ I received your letter, oiElecember 13th and^ 
want to i thank ybu for your kind remarks. 

- _ • ■• -- * .--«•-- 

^though I would like to be of. service * copies 
of- the material you requested are hot ayaUabie/for distribution* 
■, fiowevef, '-perhaps you/will want to refer ko ,} f he FBI Story* by' 
<bon ^hlteKead^hiyCh has some information on this topic. - *- 

I: am enclosing some literature I hope wilt be vbf 
.interest to you and you may. also, desire to r§ad my .new book, 
MA; Study: of Communism. " Tfee;boo^ks Mentioned. shoU|d f :be 
available atfyour tbcal public library » ?'-*', ".'"■->,- 

* '--. ~ . Sincerely yours ^ 
J? Edgar. Hoover 



TqUoa^ 



r»2 disclosures (5) : 7 f 1 r *-" . ; ^ 
eo \* -^rGommunist; illusion and Democratic Reality 
^ 4-0^152 internal Security Statement : 

Do You Really -Understand Communism? _^W~ r * 
4-B1 LElBJntroV _ ..* , ,/ W V s 

One Ration' s Response to GomMihismr " ^ -, 

NOTE: eprre^pondeht cannot be, identified in BufilejsV* 




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iCasper^ 
' Callahan 

Conrad* 

Det,oach 

,Evcn£ ^ 
. Gale, 

Ro$«n 
' ISulHvan, 

^ele\JRoom ..--J,.,,.' 

Holme* 

Candy 




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- ~~" 2821 St. Paul Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
December 13, 1962 

Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 

Director 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D.C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover, 

As a senior at Johns Hopkins University, eg) 
I am writing a term paper on "The Beginnings of 
Communism in the United States" (prior to ,1921) 
One of my objectives is to find out who, in the 
Federal Government, first realized communism, as 
a bane -to our way of life. It is for this reaso 
that I r am writing to you. 

"Mf uncle, a former F.B.I, agent, has given 
me a copy of Masters of Deceit . In the f orward o 
your book I was excited to find that as early as 
1919 (!) you recognized communism as a threat to 
our peace* Would it be possible for me to obtain 
a co&y-*of the brief that you submitted to the 
Attorhey General in that year? It would be most 
helpfjfl- and appreciated* 

*Thank you/ very much for your time and con- 
sideration. 

~, Al'so, may I, as an American, take this op- 
por tuning to praise your continued courage — 
even when your efforts have been thwarted by a 
liberal *|>£blic or government. I thank you,rand 

the Bureau, fbr your continued service. *- 
•u — 




"p^ 




J* 



::;-io3. ,5 ^i 




EI DEC 27 1962 



^ 




Q 



© 



,^^- 




Mr. fcosen._ 
Mr. SulHvanJ 

Mr. Tavel 

Mr. Trotter... 

'Tele. Room: 

Miss-Holmes- 
Miss Gandyll 



"I 



a 




s^J: 



36 (Rev. 12-13-56), 



* -* 



o 

a 



FBI 







Date: 12/21/62 



Transmit the following in PLAIN TEXT 
AIRTEL 



Via 



(Type in plain text or code) 

REGULAR MAIL 



(Priority or Method of Mailing) 




ft" 



TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

FROM: SAC, BALTIMORE (9^-382) -P- 

SUBJECT: HOWARD E. ROW. 

Assistant Superintendent 
State of Delaware 
Department of Public Instruction 
Research (Crime Records) 
BUDED: 12/17/62 

Re Bureau Airtel 12/ll/6a and Baltimore Airtel 
to Bureau 12/17/62. 

Dr. HOWARD Ef\ ROW, Assistant Superintendent* 
Secondary Education, State of lD?Tawm r eT e *Pepartment of Public 
IfTs^rucHbrir ' 1&>er^JgeieW83»^.was contacted T2/18/62 and 
rece±pir"o"f "Til's Tetter by Bureau acknowledged. 

In accordance with Bureau request Dr. ROW was 
informed that Director has no objection to his quoting 
the excerpts from ^Masters of Dece it" as set forth in his 
letter of 12/6/62, with the understanding that this in$no 
way constitutes an endorsement of the material being pre- 
pared by his committee. Dr. ROW was also advised that he 
must contact the publishers, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 
Inc., 383 Madison Avenue, New York 17, N,.Y. for their 
permission to use this material. The Director's new book 
on communism entitled "A Study of Communism", was mentioned 
to Dr. ROW as additional material of possible interest to 
him. 

Dr. ROW was very appreciative of Bureau's cooperation 
in granting permission for him to use the excerpts from 
"Masters of Deceit" as requested. He advised his manuscript 




will not reflect that the Bureau has approved or endorsed ^1 1^ 



his manuscript. 



5 5 A JSF4 : -ffljfc 




^Bureau 
^-Baltimore 
TLL:sd 

(5) _ 

« a « men 



"N 



I' 



icial Agent in 



a o 

Bk 94-382 

Dr. ROW advised he will contact the publishers., 
Holt, iinehart and Winston, Inc., for permission to use 
the material. 

Dr. ROW advised he has a copy of the Director's 
neyr book; on communism entitled, ,r A Study of Communism" and 
he plans to study it in connection with preparation ^of his 
manuscript . 

Dr, ROW stated he plans to complete hi,s manuscript 
shortly after the first of the year and asr soon as a copy 
of the .published manuscript is available he will furnish 
one to the Bureau for" information.. 

When Dr. ROW makes a copy of his publication 
available it will be furnished to the Bureau. 



* 2 - 






... r 



US 



AZ-mY2:77- 




»yi 



December 27., 1962'. 




1. 



sou Meyyi urive ~ 
"WestBury, New Ytirk 



Dear 



_U «£L 



i)t^>i would like to Jhahk ypU-and your family~foi:"your 
very thoughtful 'letter of JUteeember 17th, with enclosure. . It is 
encouraging to hear from, individuals who express a real concern 
elver 1 the growing menace of .theippmmuhist conspiracy. . :My 
associates and I appreciate yourjnteresjt in. our work aswelLas •_ 
the best wishes- you expressed.; - -. - 

. (^3 K was good of you to comment ais ^ou did regarding; 
my b6ok7\ Mastersof peceit£and I thought you might like to know 
IKave written anew bb'ok*entitied ^j^t^prCo^uifism..". This, 
bbok,is availably at ;ypur local library.. % am enciostog : =material; 
some of which contains suggestions all pj^us can use M the fight 
against:, communism. 

'■ Sincerely yourSi 



'w&m &■ i 



fm& 



^ *;■ 



Enclosures ^5) 






-r 



v fti 



Tofsoa *»* 
Bsfmont ^ 
f Mohr,^;„. t 
- CasperC**, 
•CMlaWn j 
ConraS,^. 
DeLoach ^ 
Kvans^ju. 

SuUiv 
Tavelj 

leits Hoob 

~ Holcies *-_ 

Gandy «^. 



Faith In G^.4T^Our .Answer Tp Gommunism 
The Deadly- Contest . _ 1 rfc\V 

I)o You Really" Under stand Communis 5 ® 9 ^- 



^ American* s Ci 




5 NOTE: Bu|iJgs^c^kt|^no. record identifiable with correspondent^ 

- s < MAIL BOO^ pJ Tf ECET7PB IWIT O - 



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TRUE COPY 



be 

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560 Meryl Drive 
Westbury, N. Y. 

December 17, 1962 



Dear Mr. Hoover, 



My family has admired you --as all Americans do-- 
and we want to tell you so at this most joyous and sacred Season. 

As we read your book "Masters of Deceit" we marveled 
at your knowledge of Communism — and- you began your intensive study 
way back in 1919 ! 

A thought occurred as we read/tne "dedication" of the 
Communist to his so-called cause: we who are Christians should be 
equally dedicated to our noble cause. Your book made us re-think 
our Catechism, our beliefs, and prompted us to renew vigorously 
our efforts to be good Americans & Catholics. 

May God continue to grant you good health, dear 
Sir — and a longer life to continue your fruitful work. 

• ' Sincerely, 



and her family. 



i fe M 



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hlC 



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*m*++mm**m*m**** 



Mr. Tofcpn 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. jasper- 




'■r 



Mr. Call aha 

Mr. Coip^u,, ^m 

"Mr. EgK&ach h£L 
Mr. Evans.-. 

Mr. Gffo^ r 

Mr. Rosen—. 



Mr. Sullivan. 

Mr. Tavel 

Mr. Trotter- 
Tele. Room 






"Mies HolmcB i 

Miss Gandy — i 




/ 






V 



o 



560 Meryl Drive 
Westbury, N.Y« 



hlC 



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/(LCw 7?w> \0^M-nM^ ) 37 DEC 21 1962 






cr. 



<-h "XiML "d/a^c^^o aJ* y&L^ /W^yW^ 



/y~- y*^/^ ~ ' s spy 






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iJIon^regarduT- '—*— -" - 



1 

8 



ESP^. 



^onure^ardjiur. Instructions in 
ihe.Catholic Rcll|ron*by ! *nafc*tar< 
through a correspondence 
course? 

A. Correspondence courses of- 
instructiori in the 'Catholic Faith 
have become, quite popular in the 
; last few years. One such course 
Is conducted by the seminarians 
in St.- Charles Seminary in the. 
Archdiocese of Phlladelphla.'The, . 

^course is available, without cost- 
or obligation to anyone, regard* 
less of religious affiliation. In> 
quirers receive 1 an*" attractive, 
easy-to-read text book of Cath: 
! olic doctrine and practice. They 
are supplied with five or six- 
'"open book teste',' .which are. cor- 

greeted, graded and .returned.' .& 
completed course is rewarded-- 
with a diploma. A notable fea- 
tured this course -is. that alhthe 
material, is sent in plain "enve- 
lopes without markings to -pro- . 
-tect. the inquirer's privacy. .For 
infoririatiohy write to Home 
Study Service, St. Charles/Sem.„" 
inary, Overbfook,. Philadelphia** 
51. Pa. ". 

r Another such course "is con** 

I ducted by ,the Knighteof Column 
bus. For information on> that 

write to 'Supreme Council, 

JK/of C. Religious Information* 
ji Bureau, 4422\Llndell Blvd.. St.; 

3 Louis "8, Md. "'*"* 

^^y^^^r-jis^theVCaVholic^ 
f ^formltfoirSoclety, 214 v W<"'3iiF NI '" , "*t *»? 
J ^*New.ybrk.l,^.y. '- * % I * 







. ENCLOSURE 



*? *!- 



fc ^ r 







.#* 



- 0^ ." 



December 31, 1962 * 



kl 



.RaleighTNortH^ Carolina 






Dear Mr; 



Your letter of: December^Sth has been received" 
and it is ehcqurajging to know- you f ound ^'Masters of Deceit" . s 
informative.. It is important that our citizens educate themselves 
concerning; the true nature of communism in order that they will 
be able to resist its eroding influence; 

' My asjsociates and Japprec^teyour .coMdence in 
the FBI and- you may be certain we will cpntinue/to handle our v- 
obligations with-the same- dispatch* and-thdrpughness f thatjiave 
characterized pur : investigations in the past. _.---- 

Thank^yqu !;f or your observations and for your 
expression pf Holiday Greetings. _ * 



! r.x.v£ 






V 



Sincerely yours, 

D.EdgacViopvcr . 



NOTpE: Gprrespondentcahnot.be identified to.'JBufiies; 
JH:jks(3)^ ' /'- 

&* n *l ^ «* $ 



Tolson , 



\JA 



pel/aont ^ 

Caspef — 
Calianott ^ 

^ontod ^s 

'Dejtoffcb > 

- EVjCSftS, ««« 

Gale, * 






^S.JAH8-^3 



Bos>n -,., , /.,_. 
Sullivan --S-, 

Trotter ^^^ 

Tele-HponL 
Hofoes *_«, 
Candy* ■;..■_»«. 







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o 





TRUE COPY 



Raleigh, N. C. 
Dec. 25, 1962c 



J. Edgar Hoover, 

Chief, F.B;I. 

Federal Bureau of Investigation, 

Washington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: 

if 

I have read your book, Masters of Deceit and I 
; find it to be a very accurate expose of Communism from 'Ahe 
■ start. I am recommending it to my friends to read it. I have 
(also- found-it very informative and interesting reading and I 
/consider myself fortunate to have it in mypossession evey young 
person in the United States should be encouraged to read it. Only 
tfhen can he tor she be more aware of the dangers of Communism 
and what he can do to combat this evil. It .has helped me to gain 
a better understanding about Communism and its objectives and 
I am catching on to Communisms tricks and strategy and also, 
I am beginning to read- between the lines. 

The American people urge you and your department 
never to let down your guard until evey agent, spy, saboteur 
subverter is vanquished from the American scene. We urge you 
to infiltrate the Communist party continuously until this agency 
of Moscow is completely broken up and done away with only then 
can the American people sleep safely at night. The American 
people stand by your side. We will never assume that Communism 
"cannot happen here, because we know it can and will not gamble 
on it. We hope you will investigate the Communist party cells 
at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill The Cause of The 
New York Newspaper strike (may) could be the end result of some 
Communist activities. We hope that the F. B. i will investigate 
.that because^ the strike in itself denies the right of the American 
people to learn the truth and also the freedom of the press. The 
workers^ must be encouraged to go back to work at the presses to 
guarantee the people of this freedom. 





"V - ,~ 



>4 







This Insurance Commissioner Edwin Lavier is 
denying the people of its freedom to learn about the doings of 
the State Government by banning news photographers from 
hearings the people of North Carolina, being a segment of the 
American people need to be informed more about the happenings 
of the State Governments. To be denied of this freedom is 
considered a form of Communism and we the people of 
North Carolina and Raleigh, urge the FBI. to investigate it. 

I will appreciate it if you wilLgive these matters 
your most serious consideration. I hope you have had a very 
merry Christmas and I wish you a happy New Year. 

Sincerely, 



0U3 Harvey street 



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Mr. Tolq 
Mr. 

Mr* SI 

Mr. Cifsper.. 




Mr. ftattahftti.- 

MioryConrail^^ : 

MrTEvan:* 

Mr. Gale. 

Mr. Koaen_ 



>\Jr. Sullivan. 

Mr. Tavel 

>lr. Trotter— 
Tfelc. RoonuL 
Mtea Holmes- 
Mica Gandy_ 






^&&JuJL ^^^^^S^^^rsl^ 








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UNITED STATES (/VeRNMENT 

Memordfidum 



TO 



FROM 



DIRECTOR, FBI 

TAMPA (80-287) 



JL/XXVJQ 

: JSAC, 



subject: ^'MASTERS OF DECEIT" 



I.be7 



n t^Cr ^ «>tu 



this office, wnose identity is Known to the Bureau, 
has advised that /the JLake_C.ity_ Junior Feder ation, 
or^bmenjs Clubsrhas ordered 200 copies of the 
"^aptloned^book written .by Director HOOVER to be 
used in connection with a course on Communism 
yftich is to begin: in January. 1963. and will be 



conducted by 



Flor 



- "I — ^33^=* 

The course of-study was written _„ 
and has been used extensively throughou 
da. This has resulted in the sale of a 



great many copies of the captioned book. 




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Bureau 
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January 8, 1963 



JLLL. 



Hulse^sjlestfiome _ 
"fereat Meadows^ New Jersey 



Dear Mr,[ 



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03A3LEQ_30l 
COMM-ERt 



I have received your letter of January 3rd 
and the interest wMch promptedypur communication is 
indeed appreciated. 



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With respect to your inquiry, my bpok, ; 
"Masters of Deceit," is usually available inpiiblic libraries-*!! 
or may be purchased at local bookstores; If you are unable 
to Secure a copy in your community, you can obtain one by 
•writing to the Mail Service Department of Pocket Books, Inc., 
630 Fifth Avenue, New York 20, New York. This retail price 
is fifty cents, plus five cents per book for mailing costs. 



ThQ Efifc maintains no price list for publications 
Which we have available for distribution arid there is no charge 
for^any material mis Bureau is privileged to disseminate. 
Enclosed is some literature which I trust you will find of interest. 
You may also wish to reifer to my book, "A Study of Communism." 
It is a comprehensive study of the- development and, expansion of 
communism throughout the world. , " 



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Sullivan ^~_ ■ c _-^ 
Tavel - 



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Enclosures (5) 
EFT:jM3) 



Sincerely yours,; 



JT. Edg^r Hoover 



John Edgar Hoover v 
rurectbr^. . 




Trotter .,,,. ,„ 
Tele. Roots . 
'Holmes -y . 



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Enclosures (5) 

£n Ameridari' s Challenge 
The Crime Problem 
The Courage of; Free Men 
Guidelines for a Civilization, in Peril 
i.9.61 Uniform Crime Reports bulletin 



NOTE: Buf lies' contain nO, record identifiable with correspondent. 



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TRUE COPY 



Jan 3, 1963 



Dear Sir or Madam: r 



I don't know If I get the book from your 
dept. or some other a paper back copy of J. Edger 
Hobvei rMasters of Deceit There are others I like too ^ i 

get by Mr. Hoover like The White Slave Traffic Business "7<\iC^ 
Frauds, etc I would greatly apprecite it If you could send 
me a price list of the educational material available 



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Great Meadows, N. J. 



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Traao jpernussioas 
Holt, Binohart and Y/lnston. 
303 Madlcon Avenue 
Now York 17, Now York 



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Dear 



I fcavo received your letter/^ January 6th, 
enclosing a request from Mr. Howard EffifowiJDQVor ^ , 
JMaSSEfi* to quote from '^Ha^EcWShdoTOHT' For your 
"information, Mr« Bow contacted us in December, 1962,, 
on this matter, and. by letter of December 19, 1962, J 
advised Wlss Marguerite J. Eeeco of the Subsidiary 
Bights JDepartmeht of your firm that we had no. objection 
tojis using the excerpt from the Director 1 s book. 

&incoroiy yours, - 



frAfi'AHfel 



Clyde Tolspn 



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CbsPfeJt~ ~— ~ 



NOTE; By letter 12- 6 -62, Row wrote the Director Asking to use this excerpt 
from "Masters of Deceit" for educational material for Delaware schools. SAC, 
Baltimore, conducted discreet inquiry on Row, found him to be reliable and 
subsequently advised him that we^.had no objection to his using the excerpt and 
that he should contact ihe^publlsheiC' 'By letter j.2-18-62 to Marguerite J. 
Reese (who has in the past written the Bureau requesting permission to re- 
print portions of the Director! s>f>ooks), Mr. Tolsoh advised her that We had 
no objection and that w&ffl&d asked himito contact the publisher. 



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Mf.~Be\moxktUIl, 

Mr. Mfthr ^ 

Mr. Casperl 
Mr. , Callahan. 
JUr* Conrad- 



Holt, Rinehart and Winston, inc. • publish E^feS:i££ 

[r ' "' I Mr^Rose 



383 MADISON AVENUE aaSj NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



General Book Division 



V 



January 8, 1963 



Mr* Clyde Tolson 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
United States Department of Justice 
Washington, D. C„ 



Dear Mr* Tolsom 



[?AMliflflEM 0ln J es « 
L^ «iuiss*Grandy-~ 




We enclose a thermofax copy of a letter dated January U 
i^sftom Mr. Howard E. Row of the Department of Public Instruction 
*(\jkf Dover, Delaware, requesting permission to quote, from 
^MASTERS OF DECEIT. 

We await word from you as to whether this is acceptable 
to Mr. Hoover. 



Sincerely, 



Trade Permissions 




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DELAWARE 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

DOVER 
SECONDARY EDUCATION 
HOWARD E. ROW 

January^, 19&3» 



Eolt, Rinehart nod Winston, Ino*. 
383 Madison Avenue 
New Tork 17, N. T. 

/t^fl *m*em *■« 



This letter is written to seek V****f S ff £°EDOTer, 
a noaber of lines fro* "Masters of Deceit" 1* *• ^gar wove*-, 
published by your ccspany. ^ 

The State of Delaware, Departeent_ of Public tostruotion, 
* is tearing a guide for teachers who wujl wacaa^ 

Sfto Shfpublio schools of.this state. A *£te-wide 
co^ittee has been organized for over ay^J ««*» - 
study prior to the preparation of this document. 

In a sub-chapter under the title '"^^^£^ 
of the Individual to Ccabat Cocaniai-, wewxsu w h-- — 
following excerpts from "Musters of Deceit", page *90.- 

«Be alert (and well-enough ^r^)^spot,^ose, 
and oppose Coananist eflortsj ™ ™* "£*&"* 
TO THE FBI, which has been given the job by the 
Sssident/the Congress, and the Attorney General. 
J. Edgar Hoover, FBI Director, points out Jha^ 
•Systfria, witch hunts, and *^°° ^g^ 

certaffi-that our TiEmr^^Bw^y^^^;— b—~ - 
fcr the historic liberties Of this great jetton. 
This is the fundamental proaise of any *«^ -J**" - * 

cSUnisa &«■*», character ^^^fro 

and the scattering of irresponsible charges have^ no 
SSoTto Sl» nation. They create division, suspicion, 
anHiSrust aaeng loyal ^^J£l?&** 
Cdsaunists want - and hinder rather than aid the 
fight against Consaniem 1 ". 



v. 






i 



Page No. 2 

Holt, Mnehart and Winston, Ino# 



The coazaittee will be ssoat appreciative if you 
find it appropriate to allow the quotation ae here 
presented. 



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Asat» Cfota Cc-t«# Ce©qc£axy Kacatica 
Caster C^sitt09 *c? -tb» Sts3y of . 

Kals^lSla to Ym& JCxsat Ccasaaiea 



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Conrad _-- ' 
JD«Loach ^^ 
Evans ,,._.,■,.■, 
Gale .m L "_V ~ 
~ Rosen 
"Sullivan 
Tavel 







January 17, 1963 



Mr. 

Boxsg 

Burbank, Oklahoma 

t i n i m i i fii iwii ipw ■( niirrii nf mili u m _n^ .^ 



Pear Mr, 



1 have received your letter of January 11th, and it 
is a pleasure to know of your interest in my book, "Masters of 
Deceit. " You may be interested in my new book, "A Study of 
Communism, "a copy ot which may be available in your local 
library. ,1 wish to thank you for your kind comments about the 
JFBLand to assure you it Js our hope our future endeavors 
continue to merit your approval.. 

Although, J would like to be of service, information 
contained in the files of the FBI must be maintained as confidential . 
in accordance with regulations of the Department of Justice and is 
available for official use only. I am, however-, enclosing a list oi 
organizations designated by the Department of Justice under Executive 
Order 10450 together with other publications I hope you will iihd of 
interest. ."v- . 

In addition, you may want to secure a copy of the 
H Guide to Subversive Organizations and Publications, " prepared 
and releasedl5y the House Committee. oh UrtrAmericanActivities, 
by writing' to tfce Superintendent .of J3ocunients, JJnited States 
Government Printing Office^ Washington 25, D. C. The price 
is seventy cents" t>er copy. . - 





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yN Sincerely yours, 
J -&Jga>H 00 



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tiist of Organizations Designated Under Executive Order 10450 
An American's ^Ciiallenfire 

An, Analysis of the 17th NC of the. GE, USA, & 3-60 EEB Introduction 
i)eadly Duel 



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is not identifiable in Bufiies. 



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Box 53 

Burbank, Oklahoma 

11/J an/63 



Director of PBI 
J* Edgar Hoover 
Constitution and 10th St NW 
Washington, 06 



Dear Mr. Hoover; 



o 



1 have just read your book. ) "Master's of Deceit" J I enjoyed it very much, and I 
believe it is one of the best books I have^read on the subject. It is my belief 
that if more Americans would read your book and others like it, and learn the truth 
and facts behind the Communist conspiracy, we- could jstop it cold. Coexistence 
v/ith the Communist is impossible; The middle of the roadder^S are like combat 
deserters P They don't actually shoot their own troops, but they also refuse to 
kill the enemy, there by weakening their forces « f 

i Could you tell me where I could get allist of known Communist in the United States, 
% and a list of Communist Fronts. If such a list is available. 

I thank you for your time and trouble, and for giving the American public a fine 
book. With You and the men under ,you doing the fine job to stop the communis*, 
we can be sure that if the Communist "bury us " as they say they will, we will at- 
least have a decent burial. 



/ 



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JCDonovan: 










Mr. Tolson 
Mr. Belmoni 
Mr. Mob: 
Mr. Casper!, 
Mr, Callahaiu 
Mr.^oprad.. 
Mr.] 

MrAKvans-. 
Mr. Ga!c_ 




Mr. Rosen.- 

Mr. Sullivan- 

Mr. Tavel 

Mr. Trotter— 
Tele, Room 



I; am. 

Very truly ypurs, 




Miss Holme ». 
Miss Gandy 



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January 18, 1963 



;Post Office Box 133 
Hartley, Texas^_, 

Dear l%tt 

t have received your letter of January 11th and 
want to. thank you tor* your kind reference to my book, "Masters 
of- Deceit." You may be interested ininy new bpok,; "A Study of 
p'ommunism, ?t which may be available Ui your local library. 

I am enclosing a list of organizations designated 
.by* the Department of Justice under Executive Order 10450 and 
some publications of this Bureau I.hope you will findof interest. 



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Casper w 
Callahan , 
Conrad _i 



Gale . 

Rosen: -i_ 
Sullivan i_ 
-Tavel'«iU 



' Trotter 

Tele. Roots > 
HoImesl^L 
.Gcndy-, cT_ 



= You may obtain a copy of "Guide to Subversive : 
-Organizations and publications, " prepatfed<and released by the*. 
House Committee on XJn-Arnerican Activities, by writing to the 
Superintendent of Documents, United States Government printing 
Office, Washington, D. C. The price is, severity cents per copy. 

T^SgTa 1 . .: - 

I - Sincerely yours, 

,i*ft 1:^53 i 0i;EdgarHpove^ -^ 

- r 7*/T 

.Enclosures (5) 
. AG List pi Subversive Organizations 
.^•^aith'm God-^Qur- Answer To. Commuiiism 
';SKall4t B.e. Law oir Tyranny?. __"'"■ 









-Deadly- l>uel *vr 1 U 

3-6.0 LEB Iht^oductiori and An ^l|feis^rth^^.fti National Convention of 
the Communist Party,, USA ._ o* T* 

NOTE: 



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P. 0. Box 133 
Hartley, Texas 
January 11,1 963 




Mr. Tolsoh-p^ 

lri# Casper ^ 

Mw Callahan .^,. 
Mr. CjSJbA^L-^ 
Mr. MJ/>ach K- 

Mr. Evans *._ 

Mr, Gale 

Mr. Rosen .«. 

Mr. Sullivan 

Mr. TaveL„. 

Mr. Trotter«.^. Wj 
Tele. Xoom.^-«. 

Miss Holmes , 

Miss Candy ...., 



Mr* J* Edgar Hoover 5 Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D* 0* 



Dear Mr* Hoovers 



o 



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I have been reading and studying your great work 
Masters of Deceit * I need guidiance and further printed 
i^rormatTon~tHa1Tyou might have oh this real threat to 
the world and our country* Could you let me know where 
I could obtain a copy of the following: The Attorney 
General of The United States list of subversive organiza- 
tions, and The House Committee on Un-American Activities 
(Guide to Subversive Organizations and Publications). 

I would appreciate, any -printed materials you might 
be able to send me and directions on who and where to 
write for other materials* 



Sincerely yours* 



JCG^jcg 









\ 



Hartley Methodist Church of 
The Northwest Texas Conference 
The Methodist Church 



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Casper « 
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JEvans w 
Gale,-^. 
HoseA,*— 



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Trotter: . 
TsIe.Roo 

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Jamiary 22, 1Q63 



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£Z5South jeffersorTstreet _ 
Huntihgtonrindfiana* • 



Dear Mr. 



t have redeived your most thoughtful letter of 
January 16th and wish to thank youfor your generous, comments 
about "Masters ofc Deceit.? 1 You. may be ^interested in reading 
my latest book, ^A Study of Communism,'* copies of which may 
tie available at your local public library. - , , 

»In view of your interest in matters relating, 
to communism, I am enclosing somepubiicationsCf this JBureau 
I hope you will find of interest. 

When you next, see Mr. Lesh, please convey 
my best wishes. 

- * " 

Sincerely yOurs, 






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Enclosures (4) * 

Why Recfe Make Friends with Businessmen * 

3^60 LEH/Introduction airid An Analysis of the. 17th National ponyention 
^1 the Communist Party, USA 
Deadly JDuef^ 
Thet<2urrent 6ommunist Threat 



3P^ 



NOTEr Correspondent is .not identifiable JnBuJiles. No record of 

°The Huntington News" in Bufiles. The^^on^r^e^jJ^sjph H. Lesh is jf 

on the Special Correspondents' List ona first-name basis. " \ * ^f 

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CW.H. BANGS, MAwCMfe EDITOR 'V ESTABLISHED 1990 

©ttlg JlemseVstic ^chtspapwr ^jjMishefc in janttttagfsn €tu»»ig 

$»Miel:s& J'nilg bg 5J« ^laaiittjtea gfcto*, 3ttc. 

532-84 WARRE NL3IBEET 
PHONE 62 
HUNTINGTON. INDIANA 22.R S. Jeff 618011 St 

January 16 th 
19 6 3 

Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, Direotor, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
Washington, D. 0, 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

This is to tell you how very, very much I 
tave enjoyed reading your wonderful, revealing hook, 
^Masters of Deceit, " v y 

It is indeed the Great Bye-opener and many 
more people should read it and it should he a " must " for 
all young people approaching their majority; Regardless of 
what you may have read hefore, one does not get a complete 
picttre of this awful, awesome threat, until .they have 
read, your hook. 

In addition to telling you how much' I 
have enjoyed it, this is also to thank you for writing.it* 
That hook is another of the many servioes you have rendered 
our great country. 

Incidentally, a good friend of mine, ( and 
yours too, I understand ), attorney Joe Lesh of this city, 
was the one responsible for bringing it to my attention, so 
you see I'm indebted to Jiim, tod. 

Thanks you again sir for a great service. 
I have already thanked Joe Lesh for bringing ray attention to. 
ydur splendid book. 



WM/ha 



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Most respect fully % 



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SporUs Editor. 

LPT 






io JAN #3 1963 



tE' 



Mr. Tolsonl ^ 
Mr. Belmontl^-. 

Mr. Mohr^, ^ 

Mr. Casper -„ 
Mr. Calla^ 
Mr. jte^rMX^- 

Mr.'Evans — 
Mr. Gale^-,-. 

Mr. Rosen 

Mr. Sullivan- 

Mr. Tavel 

Mr. Trotter.-. 
Tele. Roonw. 
Miss Holmes- 
Miss Gandy— 




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January 1 2X» 1003 



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Colonel Mark 
Consulting Engineer 




XTov Tork, Now Yojfc » ^ --*-+--. 

Pear Colono^b«_Ali4 1 /; 

I havo received your letter ot January Ctfy. 
and am Indeed happy to hoar from you after ouch a Ions 
tunc. 

It Jo good to know that, you feol portions of 
"Master© of Bocott? 1 worthy of being included in your pub- 
lication, and I certainly havo no objection to your reprinting 
thein. % hopo that your readers will find the material of 
interest. ^J 

**^VV i? ff Sincerely youro, 



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- Liaison (Attention Mr. 



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1 - Foreign Liaison (Route through, for review.) - 

NOTE: Bufiles contain no indication of Fox' s acquaintance with the Director; 
there are several nonpertinent references to him in connection with Ids. position 
as an Air Force .Officer, the portions he specifically requests to reprint in 
the newsletter deaTwithKarl Marx and his founding of ~^™^« *? ^ 
menUons the possibility of ^^ffi^S^^ 
should offer jio objection; Liaison 
national Development (AID), "Fox 




■ Eosdn , 



ISulkvoh 

■Tavel 

■Trotter, 

Tele, 



rz:rr: and furnished excellent references when hiifed* _ 



|oIines 
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MA& HOOM Cj* Tf^STYPE WIT Cj 



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MARK C. FOX 

A. 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 

APO 2*U, AID - NEW K)RK,N.X. 
USA ♦ « 



Mr . J . Edgar Jfcover^ 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington 2£, D.C., 

USA., 



ANKARA - TURKEY 



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Mr. Tolson! 

Mr. Belmont- 

Mr. Mohr,-.« 

Mr. Casper t 

Mr. 

Mr, 

Mr. 

Mr, |Evans« 

Mr. Gale., 




9 January, 1&&J 



Mr. Rosen..™ 
Mr. Sullivan- 
Mr. Tavel.~- 



Mr. Trotter_. 

Tele, Room 

Miss Holmes ^ 
Miss Gandy_ 




saQEBSK^^a^^ 




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I- ; * fc $t bas been along time since ± Jiaffcj the pleasure / 
fcBB -"-^of~^siting^ 

j remember me. Those were the days when -Charles H. Tompkins 
had a big house not too far from yours. 

Anyway, here at TJ.S.A.I.D Ankara, a weekly news 

letter is distributed. If is called the "Aid*- Memoire".. 

In re-reading your^ -^Hasters of Deceit" it occurred to me _ 
■* that the first chapter, pages 13 through 23, might well 
f be reprinted in this news letter. Other chapters, of course, 

could be useful reminders; and might be included as a sort 

of serial. 



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Your permission is respectfully requested ♦ 








Yours sincereljr, 




*0 : - 



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Mark C. Fox, Col. USAF (RET.) ^ ■ 






INM 2 3-yj.dE^P? 




XI JAN 24 1963 



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OFFICE TEL: 1250 30/55 
HOME TEL: 128749 



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1 *-££-£, - ©fltOMAl fOSM HO. 10 



1 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 



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TO 



FROM 



i - subject: 



Mr. DeLoach 
D. C. Morrell 



date: 1/23/63 



Tolson — 
Belmont „ 

Mohr . 

Casper « 
Callahan , 
Conrad *_ 
DeLoach . 
Evans , 
Gale . 
Rosen 



**|£ 



SULLlliEN T, ALABAMA" 




On 1/21/63 we. received the attached letter from the; above, * , : 
individual,. Correspondent enclosed^ newspaper clipping announcing that 
the- Birmingham Transit Company will present a copy of thev Director's- book, 
^'Masters of Deceit." to libraries in each of the city .and county schools the 

states, she has read this book and^cbmnients 
:er consists of 13 handwritten pages. and?deals. 



company* serves 
favorably regarding"!?: 



Her let 



almost , ftxrlnp ively with the question of outlawing the Communist. Party. 



|insists that the" Communist Party should be outlawed in the 

United States and includes various quotations from and references to scrip- 
ture to prove her point. "V " 

Her letter - ramtilflfl for m ^any pages and at some, points she - 
seems* to be overexcited, i ihas belabored her point* on outlawing 
the Communist. Party to & J Ucft an extent that the whole letter is- extremely 
repetitious, and it is felt that no purpose would.te served by makmg a true 
copy of it. Bufiles indicate one prior letter from this individual .dated 
7/28/62 which, although not as.iengthy, exhibits the same general tenor. 
This letter was acknowledged;with a' brief reply. 

OBSERVATION: 

In view of the manner in which this letter is writ ten, "it is 
felt that a reply from the Director would only tend to encourage 1 
to send m ^additional lengthy comments. 



RECOMMENDATION: 



That no' acknowledgment be made of correspondent's letter.. 

' 7 b3^/ott&77- 



Enclosures- (2) 
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Mr. Gal£^~ 

Mr. Sullivan- 

'Mr. Tavel 

Mr, Trotter— 
Tele. Room, 



Miss Holme$2U**v 
Miss Gundy*. 



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Jdmg to 
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knocked 

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jbt was 

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a radfc 

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Schools 

To Get Book 

By .FBI Chief 

T^fransco Management Club 
atypurmingham Transit Co. will 

esent a copy of FBI Director J. 
Edgar Hoover's, book, "Masters 
of Deceit," to Iibrarie^ in each 
city and county school 4he com- 
pany serves. r ~~ (ZUDJcIc 

School libraries in Birminghan£r p tr 3" , 
Jefferson, County, Fairfield, Bes- 
semer, Mountain Brook and Tar- 
rant t wiH receive tlie books, 'the 
club announced yesterday, 

A spokesman said the books 
would be delivered to the boards 
of ^education Monday J 

Each, year the Transco Manage 
ment Club, composed of super- 
visory foremen N of shops, officials 
and other management personnel 
at the Transit Company, has a 
project. Last year it presented a 
television set to the charity ward 
at Jefferson-Hillman Hospital. 

Tfie club, including retired man- 
agement personnel, is .composed 
of *48 members. 



LOS Aty 
ing of Ac; 
for prob^L 
left most *o{, 
and their if 

Actress J * 
their adop 
14; and tjtf 
were nam$ 
estate exce 
Four-Star \ 

These sti^ 
twees his >* 
mer marrir 

Atty. Eu£ 
mated tho ( 
$1 million'*! 



^CLOSURE 



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Dear MrJ 



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January 28,. 1963 



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- ;" . . . -Your letter of January 22n&was received as ' *" 

Mr. Hoover was preparing ,to>lea#the;ci^r, Hp'asked xae to 
tell yout thai he regreti he is unable tp^authorize ; your use i of : 
portions qi "Masters ^Deceit." . . :- _» 

- * ':'■_' = Sincereiy^ypursV : ; 



«■* 



Helen W. Gandy 
Secretary 




Tolson _ 
B«lnont-_ 
Motir-_L. 
Caspor J_ 
Callahan.. 
Conrad __ 
DeLoach.,. 
.EyoBs',_ 
Gale — _. 
Rosen __i. 
.SulHyern ^ 
Tavel ^ 



Trotter-. 
T?Io. 

HobneL » y - 
CandyV/ m_ 



PTE;;~Bufiies indicate thkt correspondent wrote 12-22-61 arid forwarded 
kit he purchased: from Project Alert He askedlf or the FBI fp check . - 

he material for him.. He expressed ;his faith ;,ih the Project Aier| program.. 

Te wanted to; he placed on.the maiiing.list. He i was ^dyised. that the FBI 
did not make : evaluations and although i reprint material was. sehttp him/ . 
he was told, that it could/not be furnished oil :a continuing basis. There is 
no indicag^toa^g^ is ah- author or wpuW'bein, ; any way qualified to write . 
a^oS&onTJommunism. Although he jtnayiegaliy quote briefly from the 
Director' s book withpufc»permissiph,.' since, it is not known hpw .he -jplans to 
use portijg^jDf n lVfastef;s of Deceit" ikis\beiieved\his request Should be 
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■ m » " » » ■ <■ ' > ' ■ »" r 

Mr. Tolso: 
Mr. Belmont, 
Sir. Mohr> 
Mr, CaspcrJ 
Mr. Callabswl 
l MrfK&nxo&i— * 
8 M/nfoftd&i »<. 




Mr J.Edgar Hoover 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington 2$,D,C. 

Dear Mr Hoover^ 




I Mr. Rosen 



k Mr, Sullivan- 
I -Mr. TaveL. 



J!i*. 'Trotter,, 
i Tclo. Room- 



I plan to write a book would like* to have your permission to use portions ^F ^f^ 
Masters of Deceit* ^ » 




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January 28, 1963 



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Dear 



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I am reassured when I read letters such as yours of © 
January 20th. Acknowledging the dangers posed by the communist "*" 
conspiracy and a desire to learn more' about this evil are essential 
in protecting our national traditions. 

;It is a pleasure 'to learn of your interest in my book, 
"Masters of Deceit, "and I want tp thank you for your complimentary . 
remarks concerning it.. 

This Bureau does not have available for dissemination 
copies of the document and publications you seek. -You may wish 
to make inquiries regarding them at your' local publiclibrary. . 

I am enclosing some material which I hope you will 
find of interest. - 



MAJUED go 

JAN28J963 
comm-fbK 



Sincerely yoursi 



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poison ^ 



Betmont-..^.,, 



~ CaHohon* * 
'Con;cd[ -L 
Detoqch"; 

'cfcie ,;.,.,,:, 

lf|o$Qn -~- 

Sullivan ""*_ 
tavel __ 
Trotter ^_. 



Enclosures (5) 

See jiote and Enclosures next page* 



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Ericlqsures/(5) * 

An Ariaiysis>of the 17th National Convention, Communist Party, USA, 

and 3-60 LEB Introduction' 
Expose, of Soviet ^Espionage 
The Communist Party Line 

The Current Communist Threat - 

Why'Reds; Make Friends with Businessmen, ._ 

NOTE: Correspondent riot .identifiable inBufites. toformatipn concerning 
"The. Worker" and "Daily Worker'? obtained from the. Domestic Intelligence 
Diyision.lyhich also, suggested the manner of reply Utilized. 



-% - 



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6 



6 



TRUE. COPY 



R.R. 2 Box 77 
Lewisburg, Ohio 
Jan 20, 1963, 



J. E. Hoover 

Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Attorney/General 
Washington,, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

I am a Senior in highschool and since attending Buckeye. 
Girls' State have 1 developed considerable interest in educating myself 
oh communism. 

In doing sOj I read vour booK n Masters of LBec eit?' . I 
sincerely want to. compliment you. on your book. It is the most com- 
plete source of information on communism I have found yet. 

Fhave decided to do my Senior term paper on Commun- 
ism and was wondering if you., could either send me or , tell me where I 
could jOMaih copies of the'^Jommunist Manifesto", "Daily Worker" and 
other communist literature. I hesitate to write to the Russia Embassy 
or other communist, sources for fear of their mistakingly assuming that 
I believe in or symathize with the communist belief and constantly flooding 
me. with unwanted communist literature. 

Thank you for any assistance you give me. 

Sincereiy, 



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--\- -- "' " - -v-/" > -.--C : ^ -.-.■-' - ' -" ' 
'8*- - -. '•'-." -January 25,1963 

/U _ Bforiorablo L.r^t^lcCiaren -"/■* .' „\ 

** "Jacfesdnrj, Mlssteaipp r -' ' \ w • * - _. - 

My dear Sonator i 

.*." - It was a pleasure to receive your letter"* 
: '-"* *_ .of January 22nd, and;* Want to thank ydu to your viery 

todreftar^ 
.. _ - ? contained An your communication means a/great deal to 
jnyaosociates and mo, and I would i&e yqu to know of 
,. , our deep appreciation* ; 



--•H. * 







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- New Orleans -^Enclosure . c ~" "* 1 



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_ r Mr. Suttler -, Enclosure (sent direct) 

Wrj/ a. - ; 

"NOTE F ffl^eacontain -only 1 one r ef er enceidentif iable with Mr. McCiar en. 
J)~ v -v " This indicates^ s.enfcthe Director .some materiaLhe 4 had received thrbught 
Kit** ygjb.&&iBl$. His fetter "was cordially acknowledged by outgoing of 8^3^56. 

Casper' — ~ **CK^ -X 



Callahan ^, 
Conrad « 
DeLoachT, 

Evans ^. 
Gale . 



=ga.EEB 4 1963. »» , ,/ 1 




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MAIL BOOM C3 ^TELETXPE UNIT CD 



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SENATOR L. S. McCLAREN 

6ih District 

Box 201 

McComb, Mississippi 

COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS 
Fees and Salaries, Chairmen 
Commerce and Manufacturing 
Hfghway* 
Judiciary 
labor 

Military AffVrs 
Oil and Gas 
Penitentiaries 



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ffiiBZi&BXppl $$tut£ 
JACKSON 





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I Mr. Conrad 

^1 Mr/ Evans.- ^ 
Mr^pale. 
MrflEosen. 
Mr! yWnv'an. 

Mr. Tavel I 

Mr. Trotter^. 
Tele. Room„ 
Miss Holmes 




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22 
. JANUARY 
1963 

Honorable J. Edgar Hoover, Director, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
Washington, District of Columbia. 

Dear Mr. Director.:- /^/JS/JsftS 



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After reading the remarks extended by the Honorable 
William T# Oahill in the Congressional Record , please^ 
let me make a statement regarding the fine record macle^ 
by you and your fine organization* 



While serving as District Attorney for my district 
her,e some years ago it vrap'mf pleasure to work with * 
and~have your men work with me* The cooperation was 
primarily responsible for bringing criminals before* 
- the. Court s. atnd_successful prosecution for their acts 
aganist the laws of this state*. For all of this I 
was grateful and have held them always in higli regard 
for their devotion to duty* Tour ".boys 1 ! are always 
gentlemen and dedicated servants* f 

Paraphrasing "never have so many owed so^miich to- 
so few? * All Americans owe you and your men 'a "debt* 
of gratitude that can never be paid save by support 
arid admiration* 





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beg to remain, 



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Obediently yours, 





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REQ..6i b^-J*&*j&z^n 

L. S. McClareh ^J> 

11 JAN M 1963 



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JAN 2 9 1933 

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Belmont -— « 

Ccuahan — . 

Evans =-- - 
Gab _^ 
Bo sea "',i,-„T 
SuUivdSr^« 
Tavel ^r."..„ 
Trotte/^^. 
TtI^HooIw ^ 
[olmes ^.^ 
fondy^r,, ,-,, 



Mr. 



Columbus, Texas 

i j , , , fc 7n "■""■"■' 'f'*' ^T" ; i i hi, i l 



Dear Mr. 



It, was a pleasure to receive your letter 
of January 2ist, .and 3f am indeed glad to learn that you 
enjoyed reading "Masters of Deceit" and "A Study of 
Communism." '_ , - 

. Your generous comments concerning my 

efforts as Rector of the FBI and the work performed - 
by this Bureau are most encouraging. .My associates 
join me in expressing, our .thahks for-your" thoughtfulhess' 
in writing, and we trust our future endeavors Will- war- 
rant your continued approval. 

Enclosed is some literature I hope you 
will find to be of Interest. 

Sincerely yours, 

- '". i-Bfgat, Hoover 



Enclosures' (5) 

1 •- Houston - Enclosure 
NOTE afid.,encs next page.. 




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Encs 

An American's Challenge - Directors Speech 10-d*$2r 

Let's Fight Communism Sanely I 

Communism #n& The knowledge *Eo Combat ItTl, 

Yon Versus Crime . ; 

Bulwarks of liberty 7 

NOTE: Bufiles contain: no information identifiable with- 
correspondent. Purposely ignoringjhjs cominents contained 
in the ne3Ct to last paragraph. . * * 



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January 21, 19^ 





•Mr. Rosen..... 
Mr. Sullivan. 
Mr. Tavel 



Mr. Trotter.™ 

Tele. Room 

Miss Holmes.. 
Miss Gtfndy.... 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 

Director 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Department of Justice - « 

Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover, 

I wish to take this opportunity to inform you that I have 
in my small library your two booki HkSTERS OF DECEIT^ and THE STUDY 
OF COMMUNISM.- I certainly enjoyed reading tnese books and they 
were very informative. You can be sure if you write another book 
I will add it to my collection. 

Our country should be very proud to have a man of your caliber jf 
to head one of the most important departments in our government. My P3 
congratulations to you for a marvelous piece of work. 

It seems to me that everyone should be able to read and study 
your books and be informed on the workings of the dread political 
desease, COMMUNISM. 

i * 

I have often wondered if our elected men, Senators, and Represen^ 
tatives and also the appointed officials he fully investigated, "because 
sometimes you wonder if the men we elect to office may he partial, 
to the communist thinking and easily persuaded to do their -work. 

I- trust that you may continue serving our country in this 
wonderful capacity for many years to come. 

Yours truly. 



IVlF b7C 




<{Atf3T>1963 



Box 494 
Columbus, Texas 



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6tiionju »o*m,_mo. io 'f \ 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 







Tolson - 
Bolmont , 
Moht. 




TO 



FROM 



SUBJEi 



Mr. DeLoach 




lSTERS OF DECEIT* IN 



^rtvJ&s 



By letter il-7- 



6i captioned organization, 



be 

hlC 



has sent the Director a copy o r^Mastex ? of SeEeitl' in Spanish braille. 
The book is in four- volumes;*. 



In January, 1962, 



wife ,of former 



Assistant Legat, Mexico City, aha a memDer oi captioned group, wrote 
the Director requesting permission, to print, the .Director's, book in Spanish 
braille. Since the group is a.highly^regarded^rganization engaged in. 



He referred Mrs. 



charitable work .f or the , blind , the Director advised that he had ho objection. 

|request to the publisher for its approval. 



It is felt that these volumes would be a helpful addition to 
the Library of Congress, and that the Director might wish to offer them to 
the. Library. Inspector Bernard M. Suttler, our Liaison with the.Library of t 
Congress, could m ake the necessar y contact. telephonically; It is alsojfeltS' 



that, we, should thank 



for.sendi#g«us.the;volumes and write 4 at" 



bb 



note to Edjtiggj Holt, Rinehart and Winsto n, Inc. , advisin g him that-the ,HL "p :b J c 

is not identifiable^ / 



;has been printed in braille in Spanish, 
in Bufiles; 

RECOMMENDATIONS: 



*7 (1) That, the attached letter be. sent t([ 

for the book., 

sfc-W IBEC- 21 

(2) That attached letter over Mrr^ixusonTs signature be . sent 
to Ed;Rigg, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc v j^ <jx I 1 



[ thanking her 



^SS*'** 



S fin 

(3) Tha^ip|pector.Suttler^e^p ( 




^^-^Congres^askihgSif Jthey desire the. four v^S&^6f.' , Maflt^b^D^^* l ^n" 



S**W*& 



ailyi contact tne library of 



y^A] Spanish braiiif^O/^, 




«$& #£ 



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"c. 



REC-674^^ /d ^^77_ 




January 31, 1963 



-L^_ 



. A^ Mrs) 

**S>^ . 1218 South Guhlock. Avenue 



Tampa 9, Florida 



he 



Pear Mrs 




I have received your post card dated January 28th 
and it is always encouraging to hear from individuals who are 
aware of the menace communism poses to our freedoms and. who _^ 
desire to combat this .evil. . "^ 

CD 

In accordance with your request, t am forwarding -^ 
under separate cover* 50 copies each of my article captioned 
"An Analysis of .the 17th National Convention of the Communist 
Party, TJSA" and several other publications .dealing with the gen-* 
eral subject of communism which I trust will be of assistance. I 
regret that we have no copies of. my book, "Masters of Deceit, " 
available to send to you. 



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MAILED. 2a 

JAN31 1963. 

. . COMM-FBt. 



Sincerely yours, 

ff. Edgar Hoover 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director 




fj*! 



^ 



I - Mr. ungeimeier - Room 4724 (sent direct) 

USC Material: 
*! 50 copies, each of: 




ToUon >. 
Belmont 
^ Moht w« 



\Cosper , 



An Analysis of the 17±h National Convention of the CP, USA 
Ah Americau'gjjpg^llJnge 
YounME^pple Can Help Defeat Communism 
.The current Communist, Threat y ° % ' 




ihl +' The Communi^Sj>^^Line 







SBS^fiSj ^^^ no derogatory infoijn^tfii^l&^ 



ii answer $rpKbr correspondence from her,' she was sent reprint s 
on communism in October 1960 and September, 1962. The reprints 



^ Tele. Rooa 

\ \olmes 



currently being sent to correspondent have not been previously sent. 
£FT:nab(rT4) gTOBK gp /fZ^fr^g:^ B ™** 7V ' J — ' |/:J ' 



t««*«*«j7 



ROOM 



-. V" MA1LR00UE3 TELETYPE UNIT C3 



^ 






o 



TRUE COPY 



.b6 

b7C 



218 So. Gunlock Ave. 
Tampa 9, Ela. 



Jan. 28, 1963 



Dear Sirs: 



Would you please s'end me 50 copies of 
i<An Analysis. of the National Convention of the Communist 
Party, U.S.A.' 1960 by J. E. Hoover. 

I am making up a^cMlectionpf reference reading 
for a local high schools studying 'Americanism vs. Communism 1 . 
This report is recommended by the Florida State Dept. of 
Education - So is— 'Masters of Deceit" - in case you have any 
extra copies of the 509 edition you'd care to donate. This^ 
particular schooi. Jmg nr> gnitihi e reading material - 
Thank you - Mrs J f Librarian - Tampa 



Woman's Club - 



be 

b7C 



x 





AM J- 




fc.-1» &* 



<.».- *¥*f)-~ t 



12 FEB 4 1963. 




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•218 SorGuNLdCK Ave. 
~ Tamfa9,Fla, 






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Personal Post ^/yrrf^^~^~^~ ? H " . ' ! r ;yK SJ«"! 



V^fll »p5TA Ce!3<t 




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February T, 1963 



REC-i 






feur 



t-^L 



Rou| 
Newbury^ Ohio 



Dear Mr. 



If our letter 61 February 2nd has been 
received and I ana gladto know tiilt-jroiuiound "Masters 
of deceit" of merit* * . "" 






In view -of your interest I am sending you| — ' 

some material I trust you will find pertinent. ' ^'% ^ 

Sincerely yours, 

!L EdgafcHoovet 





Tblson « 
Belcwnt,. 
Monf„ 



Conrad 

DeLoach 

Eycns 

Gale 

Rose** 

Tavel . 
Trotter-— « 
Tolq. Boom u. 
Hoktes ,^-I 
Gaudy >r ^— r .j 



S3JHB 121963 



Enclosures (5) - =_ 

*'An American's phallenge" - . 

Deadly Duel •- ■ - 4 

y Reds Miake Friends With Businessmen 
ommunism and. the Knowledge\to Bombat It! 

he Current Communist Threat - • _ 

OTE: Bibles contain no reference identifiable wi& 

information available. 

^ tj[ j 1 -! «tt »B3 . ■ * - 



be 

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with 



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£. 



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MAIL ROOM CZ1 TE LET YPB UNIT CD 




+.4J**J m +"'-\ 



%; 







RFD No. 1, NEWBURY, OHIO 
(Fuller town) 



Feb. Z, 1963 




Mr* J* Edgar Hoover 

Washington, D. C« 

Dear Mr* Hoover: 

I. want to thank you for a yety rewarding 

experience I had in reading your fJASTEES 

OF DBCEI? . 

* ** i 

How I wish that all of our teachers 'in all 
of our schools and all of our preachers inr. 
America* would *read your treatise. Tftiat a\ 
changed community for the fitter our country 
would then bei t 



Sincerely, 




<&& 



TZ779y& 7 T Ml4 



o 




II FEB ^1963. 



b 8 I 








V-W< 












# 



;, 



-/, 



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J4> 



XjU'' 



Tolsorf « 

Beimont « 

1 Casper *— 
* Callahan - 
. Conrad . 



Evans .j _ r - - 
<*ale *.,_-^. \, 
Rosen ,-r,.-.^ 



February 5,. 1963 



t<svei „p?..rar? 

trotter ^§4*1 
Tele- Rooc? ^, 

Holmes rjllJJ . n 






®lpZr/oy&77* x%%.° - 



Mr. K. J^ruliner, Jr^, Bb% hi J?£i3 1$ yf/tJ iy /&?£ 
Benkelman, Nebraska - 



Dear, Mr. Druliner: 



I have received your letter of January 30,~ 
1963,, with enclosure, and want to thank you for your very 
favorable comments regarding '^Masters of Deceit" I am 
happy to know that you found my book Of Value. 






V 



4. 

concern in- seeking to al£rt citizens to the dangers of commu- ^> v 



<o 



It is indeed^ncOuraging to note your active 



/ 



nisnu I regret, however, that in line with long-standing 
policy, I. am iwable to furnish comments or recommendations 
with regard to your proposed program. I am tsure that you 
can understand my position jxi such matters. ['■' 



You may be interested in knowing that I have 
recently written another book which, is entitled n A Study of 
Communism,*' published by Holt, Binehart and. Winston, ftic. , 
383 Madison Avenue> New York 17, New York, I, am enclosing 
material relating to. the Itopic of combating communism which^ 
may be of help to you. 



k 



_KMUU'S. 

j?F-8r^ too* 

UQMWfEet 







Enclosures (5) 

NOTEr S$eg^. A. Jones to Dejjoach memo, dated 2-4-63~ captionted 



Sincerely yours, 
^ jhtfygst Hoover . 

^ J, \&/i IIJSiiH.,83 

s*2*»? . '. -frit -Wj/ 

tai • w* -. 

BEC.D HV '■•■tH 




w 



finery. , Berikelm^$g|^*. " 
* ^^Tjts ' m ' vw *- JLilSt of 

JVA:maaj(6) ' ^ 



enclosures on second page> 






\ t 



f'\ M 



O 



Letter to Mr. R. D. Druliner, Sr. 
List of enclosures (5) 

"What You Can Do to Fight Communism and Preserve America." 

"Young "People Can Help Defeat Communism. " 

"Communis,m and* The Knowledge to Combat It!" 

"Statement on Communism, * x by J. Edgar Hoover, National Broadcasting 

Company, July 15, 1962 
"Shall It Be Law or Tyranny?" 



"■A 



V. 






R. D. ORLRINER 
*ROSS 0. DRULINER, JR. 

vovtirrkTtanttir 



7/ 



o 



LAW OFFICES OF 







DRU LINERS "DRULINER. 

BENKELMAN, NEBRASKA 






Mr. Tolson. 
Mr. Belmont, 
Mr. ^fohJ^ 
Mr. Caspe; 




January 30, 1963. 



I Mr. Callahan™ 
I Mr. Conrad,-*-^ 
Mr.O^L^^l 



Hon* J. Edgar Hoover, 
Washington, D. C. 



Dear Friend: 



o 



Mr.J^Arans. 
Mr. Gale.. 

Mr. Rosen. 

Mr. Sullivan. 

Mr. Tqyei; 

Mr. Trotter^ 
Tele. Room^ 
MSss Holmes.. 
Miss Gandy_ 



Recently I received your book "Masters of\Deceit l f on talking 
books for the blind. It is practical and informative, and very in- 
structive, so I listened to it the second time through. Then the ^ 
thought came to me to do something about it. I thought of a booklet 
or manueL.fpr Christian workers giving in condensed form the teachings' 
of Jesus and the Apostle Paul in say 25, 000 ♦words and another chapter 
on how to combat Communism, also condensed in say 25,000 or 30,000 
words, to which would be added a plan of action. I am enclosing 
copy of suggested booklet. The booklet would be non- sectarian, 
emphasising the power of prayer and the spiritual life, of the 
workers is very essential. 

The sponsors for this project will be the local churches 
of each City or Town. The plan not to be started until one or morj 
competent leaders for each church is ready to work. Each group of 
four should purchase a Holy Bible with concordance and three or 
more books on Communism, one of which should be "Masters of Deceit 

This plan would work the best in a City where a revival has 
just been conducted, for instance where Billy Graham has organized 
a good corps of workers. g^-jg REe .. 6 6 ^. /4< /^/^^. 

If you know of any plan similar to the one I have outlined 
I' would do nothing further with my plan. If you think it has-merifc 
I would be pleased to have you suggest one or more per sons, whb^wojjdsL r 
be competent to write up the chapter on Communism. 

bates § f9S3.. 

The writer is a veteran of the Spanish-American War; a 
graduate of Nebraska College of law and will be ninety "yesars'tof &§&** 
February 6th 1963. Over ten years ago I developed a blood clot in 
each eye, destroying the central vision so that I pannot read. I 
have some marginal vision and walk two miles every day and have good 
health. I am a member of the Methodist Church and for thirty years 
was superintendent of the Methodist Church School. Politically I 
am alfcepuj&icanl i ^AW.Pr , • _ 

m^V ^ f " r. d. Druliner, Sr. 



MT' 




/■ ENCBdSURB 







o 

The name, n Four Friends," selected for this plan o£ Christian Service 
was suggested by the Apostle, St. John,, as, he records the words of Jesus, 
"Greater love yas no man than this, that a man lay down his life for; his 
friends/ 11 "Ye are my friends if ye do whatsoever I command you. No longer 
do I call you servants, for the servant knoweth not what his Lord doeth : , 
but I havecalled you friends for all the things that I have heard of my 
Father I have made known untd you*" •* 

The study material for the organization should be the: book of St. Mathew, 
describing the life and teachings of Jesus. The discussion of the readings 
should take place each Wednesday and Sunday evening. The Wednesday evening 
meeting shall be at the home of one of the members; the Sunday evening 
meeting shall be at the Church and the Pastor and Leaders have charge, 
and invite the public to attend. 

The Church should supervise a one-half hour of music and singing each . __ 
Sunday evening. The junior choir, /ages 10 to 18 yearsand the senior 
choir age 18 yfears and upward. 

The book of Act of the New Testament also should be studied. It 
describes how the desciples put the teachings of; Jesus into daily living. 

There are majiy books exposing Communism. Among the best are "Masters 
of Deceit^" by J. Edgar, Hoover; "I Led Three Lives" by Philbrick; and 
"Communism and Christ," by Charles K. Lowry; , ^ 

The three aforementioned 1 books on the exposition, of Communism should 
be read by all in the group and discussed also. This study would give a 
solid foundation for each member of the group on which to stand in his 
fight, against Communism^ The only way to defeat a lie is with the truth. 
Jesus said: "The truth shall make you free." 

The time alloted for all tneetings of the group .should be divided 
one-half to Bible study and one-half to the fight on Communism. This 
could be varied however, to suit the groups. * The evening meetings in the 
homes of individual members can be largely for the fight ag;ainst Communisnu 

Any person who is a, member in good standing; of any Christian 
Church, is twenty -one years of age, and\x?ho has completed the course 
of study outlined herein^ and has received a Certificate of Proficiency 
by the Pastor ma/ become a leader iri this plan with authority to organize 
and instruct a group of men and women of four or more, to follow the course 
of study outlined herein. 

It shall be the duty of the four friends as soon as they have finished 
the course of study, each for himself or herself, with the assistance of 
their leader or instructor to select four other persons or more. They 
shall proceed with the course of study in the same manner as did the 
first four friends, and when the course is completed, they shall each 
receive a Certificate of Proficiency. 

There are now sixteen new leaders whose duty it shall be to organize 
and instruct sixty-four new leaders. In like manner each of the sixty-four 
leaders will select a group of four and complete the study as the others 1 
have done. This plan of leadership training should be carried on 
indefinitely as long as the menace of Communism continues. The new 
leaders will hold their positions, indefinitely. 

If new families move into the Community, they* should be welcomed 
and invited to join the "Friends." If someone, is in trouble; if they 
need , help or employment - - help them find work. If a fellow traveler^ _ _ 
is waivering invite him to join the "Four Friends." 

J. Edgar Hoover says the Communist is to be pit tied. Many of them 
would like to withdraw. There is a way to get them out. Help them. 
Thg foregoing is one way. 

WHO WILL FINANCE THE PLAN OF THE FOUR FRIENDS? We will need help. 
It is possible our sponsor can secure help to start the meetings off; 
and then the churches may have some funds evailable for the purpose. 



* 



a 



o 



February 8, 1963 



«s* 



•<& - S*¥* 77- 2 9? i 






i - * 



23134 Myrtle Street, 
DearTbprnrMicW^n 



Dear Mrs 



It ms a pleasure to receive your letter of 
February 1st, and Ijrant to thank you for -your' thoughtfulness 
injsending\nie a copy of "The Ford ^96$ Almanac." 

dp In response to your request, if have-autographed 
your copy of "Masters of -Deceit, " and I am returning it/to you 
under separate cover. I am enclosing the 50£ which you so 
thoughtfully provided to cover -the mailing cost. 



" ' 'mo&'V m 

CCWM-FCJ 



Sincerely youri,, 
IL EdganHooveK " 



Enclosures (2) 

•1 - Mr. Suttler> Enclosure 



V? 



£5 

""Hi" 



S 

TO 



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if? 

Tolson -._-_ 

Belmont ^ ~\~_. 
u*&* - _\ ^ ; . 
Casper ^ y*_ * " ■" 
Callahan Jz --* _ . 
Conrad 
DeLoach 
Eyans * 
Cal. 
Bosen 

SuIHvan . V , 
Tavel, ,. ._ ,^ , 
Trotter t . .,,,.,. r.j 
Jele^oocft^ 



3ST0TE; See Morrell to IteTiQach memorandum dated 2/7/63 caipqiS 

Dearfcorn, Michigan. *§ 



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TRUE COPY 



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LOgah*2-3933 



By Appointment Only 



Dear Sir - 



23,i-3^4iMyrtle Street 
Dearborn, Michigan 



February 1, 1963 



I am writing to ask a favor of you - would you please 
autograph our copy, of your book "Masters of Deceit" for our small 
personal library? I have enclosed . 50£ for the return postage on 
our book. 

I have also enclosed a Ford Almanac for you — which 
I thought you might like to have. Henry Ford was 1 born here in Dearborn,, 
not too far from us. 



Thanking, you, 



Sincerely 



/s 



-bo 
b7C 






fYYvS^, Q) 





Mr- Tolson. 
Mr. Belmon 
Mr, Mohr5 
Mr. Caspc: 
Mr. Callabi? 
Mr- Co 
Mr. De 
Mr, Evan 
Mr. Gale^ 





Mr, Rosen,—- 
Mr. Sullivan. 

Mr. Tavel 

Mr. Trotter.-, 
Tele. Room.^., 
Miss Holmes.. 
MisS'Gandy— 



ft. 



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By Anointment Only 



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23134 Myrtle Street 
Dearborn, Michigan 



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' f '7 FEB 1963 






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RNME 

Memorandum 



oraOHM rout no. io 

UNITED STATES GOVERESlENT 



O 



TO 



FROM 



Mr.. DeLoach 




date: 2-4-63 



B.W« 



Jf? 



subject: JR..J^RULINER,J3R, 



BENKELMAN, NE BRASKA 



^•"'^wraw^fisiwste^^^ 



Tolson — 
Belmont - 

Mohr 

Casper — 
Callahan , 
Conrad — 
DeLoach , 
Evans , 
Gale 



■****?■*& 




By letter 1-30-63, captioned 1 individual writes the Director that 
he recently receivedHMasters of Deceit" on talking books for the blind. He 
found it most informatiVTanalTsteried to iTtwice. DrulineiLindicates- that he is 
90 years old and has only marginal vision. He states thafylistening to the Director's 
book, he thought of ah idea whereby a manual for .Christian workers would be 
prepared -which would give the teachings of Christ and the Apostle Paul, as well 
as ways to combat communism. He indicates that the booklet would be used in 
study groups sponsored by local .churches and he suggests ''Masters of Deceit," 
along with >'I Led Three Lives',' by PhUbrick arid "Communism and, Christ" by 
Charles K. Lowry as suitable materials to be read by everyone in the groups. 
He suggests that, if the Director' finds his plan has merit, he suggest someone 
to write the material on communism. 

You will recall that "Masters of Deceit?' was taped by Special 
Agent William Stapleton of the Crime Records Division, and was turned over to the 
Library* of Congress as a humanitarian service; the Library has made it available 
to organizations throughout the country representing the blind. 

""■^ 
Bufiles contain no identifiable data on.R. D. Druliner, Sr. - 

. _ Jtis.felt,that-tne-Director wilL not wish to comment on-Pruliner's 

A proposed program; however, we can advise Kim of , the Director's new;;book, 
r"A, Study of Communism" and send appropriate reprints on communism which 
I may be of "help to him. JV * . 



RECOMMENDATION: 






U<2-J 



That the attached letter be sent to R.. D. Druliner, Sr. 



.Enclosure 

JVAimas 
(4) "«* 



a_jr- 








FEB 12196 




fc?3*3 lljf3 



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oriiOKM. ?©*** wo. ?o 






STATES. GC^^^^' 

MemoraMWn 



UNITED 






TO 



FROM 



Mr. De Loach 

D. C. Morrellfrfy 



date: 



2/1/63 




Tolson _ 
Belmont , 

Mohx 

Caspet ■ 
Callahan 
Gontad 
DeLoaeh^ 
Evans . 

Gale . 

Rosen — — 
Sullivan _- 
Tavel , 
Trotter — 
Tele. Boom , 
Holmes - — 
Gandy ,.,, 



^ 



subject: 



.LL 



Di^RBORNrMIQHIGAlJ 




^ Bv letter of 2/1/63, captioned individual forwarded a paperback 

to the Director or the EBI. 



Bufiles contain no references to Mrsj__^r her l^usban^ 
— I inasmuch as this is arequest onLy tor tne gj^£»&g^ 
pendent's own copy of Masters of Deceit, " it is felt the Director 



i .» 



in the corrto^v»«v... — ; *.„ , 

would want to comply with her request. 

RECOMMENDATIONS: «r 

(1) That the Director autograph (sign his name only) Mrs, 
paperback copy of "Masters of Deceit. " 



CO 

***** 



b6 
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(2) That correspondents 50 cents be retfirneff to her. 



■Oj 



(3) That the attached letter be approved and sent. 




Enclosure ,#Lj2_~v^_^ u . 

♦//'TnrA'nrll 




/fi)'RVA:pdh j|> 

f (2) «f 









'3 I '/WW *« 



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5 4 FEB 14 1963. rt° 



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February 12>. 1963 



/# 



.Mr. 



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GUymon, Oklahoma 



<fo Bear Mr. 



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- Your' letter of Febrtiary5th has ibeeh received in 
JMr. Hdoyer^srabsehce from- Washington. - -". -" - - 



fc>" 



f, , ■*. . In response to iy6ur inquiry, Mr. Hoover's book, 
'^Masters of JCteceit, " as well "as his other book* "A Study' of 
Cdmniunism,, 11 is pubiishedlby H6it t Rinehart and Winston,. Jh£> , 
.^^Madison Avenue." ^NeW York 17, NewYork* 

4 Please beassured'.thaiyoiir 
^e. brought to Mr. Hoover 1 sf attention when he .returns, and J Mow 
he would w£hfc me to than&you Ior^yqur v kind; comlinent; 




-Jh* 



# 






Bejlbont ^ 

Caspe^r-^ 
Callahan>. 
Cowad««; 

E\rons JfW ^ 
Gole **»**— 
Bosen* t "~ 
.SuiUvyn £ 



Sincerely yours, 



Helen M^ -Gaiijcty- 
gecretaVv 




Y* 



&> 



h$h 



\"Fei this "reason an in-absence jeply Ji^d^eine'd"apprbpriate. 



b6 
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, - Holmes , 
Gaady.- 



MAlJLftOOMCS; TjELETXPE UNITE 




v t 




6 



BOX 112 610 E. FIRST ST. 

GUYMON, OKLAHOMA 
Telephone 219 and 757 




■D O 

b7C 



Guymon , Oklah oma 
February 5,1963 



Mr.J # Edgar Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation. 
Washington, D . G . 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

I hesitate to write this letter because I know you are 
a very busy man. But I have exhausted every channel and 
I cannot find what I am looking for* 

I had a copy of your booK ^ Mast ers of Deceit" and I think 
it is the most enlightening bbtfKJT^TO^SMifri^Th ever wfcfcten. 
I loaned this book to someone and have lost it and I cannot 
get another because I do not know the publisher* If you 
would be so kind as to inform me who published this book, 
i would be very grateful. 




Yours very ^nceirely , 



b6 
b7C 



Box 112, 

uuymon, ukla 



9tl-TQ 



# 



*■ 



A FEB 18 ,1963 



&Vt 



jot** 



e^ 




-^ 



y 



6 



6 



DIRECTOR, EBI 

ATTEN: CRIME RECORD^ 

SAC, SPRINGFIELD (80-390) 



2-6-63 



oh** 



"A STUDY OF CJOHlIt^NIS^ ,, 



It may bo of interest to the Bureau to know 
that information has been received from OTIS RANDOLPH, Public 
Relations Director, Moorman Manufacturing Company, 7 <$uihcy, '■-, 
I Illinois, to the effect' that all of the executive jferspnnel 
of the company have completed a; course entitled ^.Ereedqnl v. 
Communism" sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Quincy. 
The_ company is in the process of exposing all company* 
employees to this course. ' »- . % 

In addition, JJr. RANDOLPH commented oh January 29 * *Svf 
f*^ 1963, that the company had purchased 30 paper back copies of 
0> "Masters; of .D eceit" audi is liSiti$ them as textbooks supplemen 




the course M J5ree^m y ► Communism*' • 



supplementing 



t 2 - Bureau 

I ,1 - Springfield 

BDG:VLS 

(3) * 






% 



NOT RECORDED 



J* 



^(9^7 



f***g"5Bi 



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15 



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Bejaont 
HtehrC 



U & 







7? 






February^ 13, 1963 



r42a Mquntam t i5o\ueyard 
CSHand 11, ^li fornia 



I have received your letter of January 31st and 
want you to Jmpw how much I appreciate your kind comment 
cpncerhing&Masterg of Deceit. " 

With reference to Khrushchev's statement quoted 
in your communication, we can be certain that it was not made 
in a religious. sense as communism is a completely atheistic 
philosophy. Karl Marx called religion "the opium of the people' 1 ' 
and Khrushchev has stated, "We remain the atheists that we have 
always been.'* "■ .. 

-* Enclosed is some literature I hope will be of 
interest to you. Perhaps you wilt also want to read my new 
book, "A Study. of Communism, 91 which. traces the history of. 
communism since its inception and carefully contrasts it with 
our American freedoms. This book should be available at 
your local public .library. . 

"j Sincerely yours, 



he 

hlC 




$ \r i **>*•$ 




Bo&en ]__ 



Enclosures 

Know your FBr "- A'f 
The Story of the FB^g* v m 
Communism aKi^lfe 'College Student 
Time o£ Testing :.;^ ••<!?*£"»***£* 

^ Young People 'Caij = Help Defeat Communism ' 



3^ 



Sfcr^ -The Story of the FE 

Conrad „« 
Detach" 
Evans „, 
Gale^ 



OW 







^ 



*-ya NOTE: .Correspondent cannot be identified in Bufiles. 



_-; V MAIL HOOM ED TEt^TyPE'Wrr EZ1 






fft 







TRUE COPY 
Telephone OL 8-1866, - r tic 



1423 Mountain Boulevard 
Oakland ;li; California 



January 31, 1962 



Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Departement of Justice 
Washington, D.*C. 

pear Sir; a 

I ani a fourteen year, old 1 boy very much interested 
in the fight againt communism; I have, just finished your book 
Masters of Deceit .and it is by far the most authoritative book on 
communism I have ever read; " 

There, is i one .question :!•; would like 'to; ask. you. On, 
page 47 (I read the paper back edition; publishedby cardinal) in the 
chapter "Stalin— a .Fallen Idol" there is »a quotation by Nikita 
Khrushchev: ". . . God grant that every communist should fight' for 
the interest- of therworking class as Stalin^did. " If the communists 
are atheists why vetoes Mr. Khrushchev use the word "God"? % _ 

Sincerely ^yours, 





*4^' ■> 










he 

hlC 




Mr. Tolson 

Mr, Belmo 
Mr. Mohr,i 
Mr. Casper 
Mr. Callahan. 
Mr. Conr 
t Mr. D**l,/a^i fc? 
Mr. Bv 
Mr. Galc^ 
Mr. Rosen..,. 
Mr. Sullivan, 
Mr. Tavel,*_ 






t 




IWHViWll 



4F 



Mr. Trotter^- 



Tcle. Room™ 
M ? ss Holmes- 
Miss Gandy 



I- 



I . "i 



«WW«Wi*^P 



SJ. 



2-TetepSone OL 8-1866* 











b6 
b7C 



1423 Mountain Boulevard 
Oakland 11, California 



fanuigUf 3%/%%, 





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Jo7C 




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Jffife-tt 




Tolson 
Beltfoht 




^ 'J/4? ±77 * 3 



February 10, 1963 




] 



Mr J 

Route 1, Box 209 

Cfalf stoga^ tSJilarjiia__ 



m 



fJT 
O 



33 



m 

GO 



bo 
b7C 



Dear 






o 

sz. 



Your letter of February iltti has been received, 
and I appreciate your kind comment ^nd interest in my book, 
"Masters of Deceit. ". 



Although I would' like to be of service, information 
contained in the files of the FBI must be maintained as confidential 
in accordance with, regulations of the Department of Justice and is 
available for official use only. . I regret I am unable to help you 
and hope you will not infer either that we do or do not have data, in 
our files relating to the subjects about whom you asked. 



nr> 



of interest. 



Enclosed are some publications! hope you will find 




Gcrndy - - - -- 



Sincerely yours, 

Enclosures (3) °- Edgar Hoover " 

Deadly Duel 
Storming the* Skies 
Current Communist Threat 

NOTE: Correspondent is not identifiable in Bufiles. Bufiles show that 
Stanley Mosk has been reported by informants to have been a sponsor for a 
v helf|by the Joint Anti-fascist Re%>gee Committee (JAFRC) in 
%igelesDm»i()45. His name was contained in the letterhead of the 
American Committee for Spanish Freedjpm, (ACSF) in 1945. During 1945-1957 
he wa%^iJadvisor for Ameri&arii'JToiith for^lmocracy (AYD). Mosk was like- 
aWedinj^45 as the Los Angeles Chairman for the "Winter Clothing 
rive of the American Cnmmittee'fm'Vhornglav TteliPf nf Southern r?aHfnm<g " 

The sbov: 

organizations nave ueen cuea pursuant to executive uraer lufiou. In. January, 

n^QlpOgp Mosk was highly critical of the activities of the. Christian Anticommunist 

D £®riv£&Ml&. f<3PA *w»,*t Yifltrp ^ OTHER NLG v AG, 77 Civ 999 (USDC, SDNY) 

«<*V*RMW:mlh (3» W w" \ - 






Mr. 



of Stanley Mosk, is in 



Section A, Reserve, Index*, He was described as friendly to m embers of 
flie" Communist Pai^tv and follow s Party lines on major issues. 



be 

hlC 



iie made a trip to Russia and Soviet b^Loc 
countries in 1961s He was reportea\tb liave praised conditions in thQse 

COUntrieS. - . _ OTHER NLG v AG, 77 Civ 999 (USDC, SDMY) 

Allan MacGregor Cranston, possibly Identical to the Allan 
Cranston noted in the incoming, was born in California in 1914. jSinee 1947 
it has been reported heis communistically inclined .and was rejected for 
service in the Office of Strategic Service in 1942 and again. in 19.43 because 
of communistic leanings and associates.. : 

Artie Samish was indicted ty a "Federal Grand Jury: in 
San Francisco for evasion of income- taxes for the years 1946-51 inclusive. 
On lI>17-53 he was; found guilty on eight counts and sentenced to 3 years. 
He; was released from McNeil Island Federal Penitentiary 5«i2-58. 
He is reportedly' a close associate of such Well-known hobdlums as 
Frank Costello, Joe Adonis and others. 



"^ — T 



9V.^ 



A^w- 






6 



/£' 



Feo. 11, 1963 
Fed. Bureau of Investigation: 
Attn. Mr. Hoover: 

It seems to me that you are doing a ^ood 300 vrilth this Commie 

a 

situation and after reading your book "Masters of Deceit" I feel 
as though you know the answers. 



Mr. Tolsoiv 
Mr. B.elmoj 
Mr. Mobr, 
Mr; Caspar 
Mr. Callahan*-*, J/ 
I Mr./6onrad ,.™y/ 
p^^TDeLoach .VI 
/J \ M*. Evans ~ — . 

I H*. bale^ «. 

* Mr. Rosen 

t Mr. Sullivan 



i 




Mr. Tavcl„« 
Mr. Trotter. 
Tele. Room. 
f MUs Kolmca, 
Mi& Gandy~ 



\^ 



There are some people that have been in, the question box and 
I remt your opinion on them and some of the things that have been 
said and published about them. 

One of these people 6s Stanley Mosk the Attorney General of 
the State of Calif. I have read several very incriminating stories 
about bin and his activities. I am nbt a witch hunter but I am 

i 

inclined to believe these articles. Y/hat is your opinion of this 
man? 1 Does he have a past of being helpful to and o£ being very 
.close to the Communists in this country?^ Also is 




card carrying member of the Communist Barty U.S.A.? 

There is also Alan Cranston State, Controller, Artie Samish 
and the activities of others that are not beyond reproach. 

Xou eke nia£ not be able to tell me anything about these men 
out due to these things I have read I am sick if these things are 
really going* on in this good old U.S.A. Please answer tftis letter x 
as I need to know. £fc ,„_ SEC- 42 ^ ^ /jf* ?7~ £ f f ^ 



^Jog 



Sincerely yours i 




to 12 !|3okh, 
LB 1 




p FEB^5'1963 



«PTi* 







, -Tit. 1 Box 209. 

Mr , -. j Calistoga, Calif. 






**-*** X!f* 



u 




o 



6 fr,t*4i?l 

^5r* , ^- 1 

-JfrJ 



February 20, 1963 



#> 



^122Xav£naugft 
Houston, Texas 



Dear 1 Mr, 




be 

b7C 



I have received your letter of February 15th and 
want you to Know how much i appreciate your kirid comments 
concerning "Masters of Deceit. M 

With reference toKhruohchev^s statement Quoted 
in your communication, We can be certain that it wafc not made 
Jh a religious sense as communism is -a completely atheistic 
philosophy. Karl Marx called religion "the opium of the people" 
and Khrushchev has stated, "We remain the atheists that, we have 
always been." 

Enclosed is some literature I hope, will be <of 
interest to you. Perhaps you will also want to read my new 
book, "A Study of Communism, " which traces the history of 
communism since its inception and carefully contrasts it with 
pur American; freedoms. This book should be available at 
your local public library. 

Sincerely yours, 




3v/e r 



ftjjfr PWBNfc8f$i& 





Tolson^ 
Beloont 

'Moht 
Casper ^ 
Callahan 
Conrad 

'DeLoachC 
Evans 

~Gale 

i Rosen 



Know Your YBt 



L?B \% 





Time of Testing 

Young People Can Help defeat Communism -,.» , , ,_ 
NOTE: Correspondent cannot be identified in t£uf ties. 
JH:jks (3) J&r 

HAlLROOMlLJ TELETYPE, UNlfO /tit^M 




S3 

O 

o 

g 0T U) h 



liEC.D 












4 




^i—f V* 








February 15, 1963 



JU Edgar Hoover 

Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
506 Old Post Office Building 
Washingtpn 25, D. C. 

Dear Mr, Hopver: 

I am a senior in high schoot and am taking a course in American 
History* In this course, we are studying the development, growth 
and effects of Communism and how to recognize it when we see it* 
In our study, ,we use the book you wrote on Communism c Maste rs of 



Deceit . Everyone thinks it is very interesting and informative* 



In reading the section pn u Stalin - A. Fallen Idol", I note you have 
quoted a, speech that Mr. Khrushchev made at a diplomatic reception 
in Mowcow and in ±he speech are these words: "God grant that every; 
Communist should fight Jcor the interest of the working class as - 
Stalin did". This statement stunned me when I read it, because I 
knew ,that the communist people* are devout atheists. The only 
interpretation of this statement I haye reasoned is that, the God 
being talked about here is Lenin, because in subsequent pages, you 
say the people held Lenin as a God. 

/l spoke to toy teacher about thi£ matter and she couldn't give any 
I further explanation. She suggested that I write you and perhaps 
I you could help us. l£ you could, I. yould appreciate your explana- 
| tion on this subject ^go as to help clear it in our minds. 

II 

Thank you. 

Yours very truly , 






nJ 




Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. uh%T?*itz? 

Mr. Evans 

Mr. GtU^ 

Mr. Rosen — «_ 
M r . Fui/an^. 

Mr. TaveL 

Mr. T* tt rt r 

Tele, ilostti 

M*J3 Il^nes 

Miss Gandy 





(~*<lJ 



b7C 



6122 Cavanaugh 
Houston, Texas 



SS/bv 






6$ 



feBI 



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17 FEB18-1963 



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February 21, 1963 



REC3 



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Mrs 
JftgVOffice JKk 684 
Efotf Springs", Arkansas 



£>ear Mrs 




be 

hie' 



I Iwve received^ydur letter of February JL4th and 
Twant you. to know how much I appreciate your kind comments, 



. rn. 









You have ;.eyery right to be proud of winning the 
Americanism plaque three years in a row. It is encouraging 
to know of your interest in preserving our heritage of freedom. _ 

I have urged our citizens to educate themselves concerning the . *~+ 

true nature of communism in Order that they will be able to resist 
its eroding influence, and to exhibit in.ppsitive waySifoe superjbrity . : 
of ouriormof government oyer any foreign ideology. - 

Enclosed is some literature I hope will be of Interest 
to you. It contains suggestions all of us can use in fighting communism 
and protecting ourNation's future. 



to 









X^t£~&; t" 



Sincerely yours, 



i Ffcfr > i fj$ 



■r- 



c^a 



Tolson , 



Conrad ■, 

■jDeJLoacn: ^ -----^i : - 
Evaiis ^-.^ ■ -^-A 
Gste , / F - ./ " 
Rosen LJ 
Sullivan , 
Tavel -_ 
Trotter « 
T©1&. Room 



enclosures (5) 

One Nation's Response to Communism 
Communist illusion and Democratic Reality 
Communism and The Knowledge To Compay&! 
What You^an Do tp^Fight COinmuhism 
^An American's Chafie^" 



V 



rf5 



5 



I 








/' 






OTE: Cpr^esp^e^cannot be identified in Bufiles. Correspondent's 
uH*Pgf,^ V^ ~; : J comment concerning the Director retiring is purposely i 
W*y r M~~* ignored. , -. ' ' L L 



6**1 



'>*■■&. 



)v* 














Hot 
p 



Spring's j J.rk. 
Feb. 14, 1965 



J. Edgar Hoover 
Director, BBI 
Washington, D. C„ 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 



d 



Mr/Tolson 
Mr. Belmont 
Mr. Mohr 
Mr. Casper. 
Mr. Callahan. 
Mr. Coni 
Mr. DelAc 
Mr. Evans 

Mr. Gale 

Mr. Rosen. 

Mr. Sullivan. 

Mr. TaveU 

Mr. Trotter— 
Tele. Room^.. 




Miss Holmes- 
Miss Gandy_ 



I reading your book '*Ifasters ; of j fegg l* 1 * £9* * 
j made- me~had the urge 7tb SI *wririo y 6ti"^rT§ t ter i 



the second 
time made- me had the jir gertoHvrrEo~y W~§TTS t ter telling 
how I like your "book and the truth you telling, makes one 
more scare/ I just finished reading the Newsletter of Feb. 8, 
making me more afraid for our country. I am loc&l and 
Dept. Americanism chairman for Veterans of World War One* 
Auxiliary here in Ark$ns%s and I try to find and read %s 
mach as I can so I be able to t$lk.> In, 1958, 1959 and 1960 
I wonned the Americanism plaque at the state convention of 
the American legion Auxiliary for promoting more Americanism 
than any other Unit in the St%te of &rkans&s# it ts&s the 
only time iri a period of thirtyrsix ye^rs it was awarod to 
a Unitmore than twice in succession, and I retired JLt and it 
hanging in the American legion Auxiliary room in Hot Springs • 
in 1961 and 1962 I wonned th# national $.ward at tho National 
Convention of Veterans of World- War. One# Many times I s<tand 
alone, but I still go on fighting for principle I believ% % in 
c.nd I finally win in the long run. Anybody can go along with 
a mob or crowd, but I cs.n't see it, as I ha t ve 100$ fighting 
Irish blood- in /no. 




T) 



X 

c* 



This country is too wonderful to lose it; Our forefather 
fought hard for this country and the boys and women who" 
i served our Country mustj^ified in vain. There are three^men" 
I whom I admire-first my 'husband, Hoi' only admire but love; - 
•I seoond J. 3dgtir Hoover; third General Douglas &cArthur. There 
Hwere two other men but they hajee passed on Senator Joe McCarty 
who was crucifix and Senator Bob Taft. I hope "some day to 
see you and hear you talk. I wished, it was possible, to ^ve 
you here to talk on Americanism and against Communistisiff&but 
I know it would be impossible. Some years ago you was tgj Too 
in Pittsburg, Kansas $.t the Kansas Teacher College and gwos, , , 
intending to go, but something came up and I was unable*.*to '%&£■ 
I used to live in Kansas. REC- 16 cfl?fw ^^^iFFEIr 

The things that goes on here in Hot Springs are tef^ibJj^A ** 
black babies market, dope $<fcd. I know you know inore qgjout o 
Hot Spring's) thJifiOl^ojeven I live here. Since I have -become^;'/ 
Justice of the Ee&ce i r lieen hearing about different M^np^ 



Being a JP her.p -in Arkansas doing mean anything. 

know scntojbh£^g%^nA S5 oeknnot tell any officers as they may -be 

in the ring" or receiving a pay off. 



19,63 



«ay *oe r . n , 




,\ 1 would like tjo do more for Americanism, Tfnd would appreciate 




1 1 






a 



'I if you ha,vo way suggestions. 



— V* 



Q 



V* 



^>? ^v 



It worry-'me about the future oiT the FBI when you retire 
or something; a,s you b&v© kept it on the up and up; Wh$t 
would Robert Kennddy do and appgint; WHO AH3) WHAT, 

This may be useless in writing this letter ss you receive 
thousand o t f letters a day, but X wanted to write to tell 
you %re doing wonderful job in writing books; and over thing. 
I was very happy to' heir the message you sent to Pulton' Lewis 
Jr* on his 25 year s^ on the radio, if there were more folks 
like him "this nation would be "better off. 

Again I*vould appreciate &ny suggestion you may h%ve to offer. 

Jexy truly yours, 



bo ' 
b7C 



■A> 







m 



■«C.W-W^/tfV%2-7''7>^^'? ; ^tauaryl4, 1963 






Mr. 

167^JBurton,stiiefi3L 



Tolsoh.,, 
Bftlbont*, 

Mohr — „ 



cjwr , 



CatfaHqn , 
"Conrad «*, 
DeLoach , 
.Evans ^ 
,GaIe —-I 

Sullivan*. 
TaVel 



Holmes 
Gaudy 



San Diego 11. Calilprnii 



DearJMr 



received. 



Your card/of February- 5, 1963, has been 



In response to your inquiry, I would like to 
adyise< that my book, "Masters of Deceit/* was published, 
by Holt, Rinehart arid Winston, inc. ,;383 Madison Avenue^ 
New York 17, Slew York* and it sells for $5. 00 per copy* 
Other articles and, statements, regarding the menace of 
jcommunismprepared by the FJ2L are distributed bv this , 
Bureau free of charge. - , ''' 

*~- I can/|>e of no assistance to you in connection 

with material disseminated by t&e United. States Government^ 
printing Office. You, may wish -to .direct your inquiry in this 
regard to the Superintendent of Documents there . 

Sincerely yours, 



k. 



J..U 



- -, mum* - 


f£c-Ki^tr 


COMM-Fpf '/,' 



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-^VO*V *tV >**•—*** 



/John Edgar Hoover . 
-Director " v 



NOTE: Correspondents nojt identifiable fifcBufiles-. His 
lei" "'" 

' S a'booklet. .«' ■'. V - -* -<" "^ t £B U{fWTOT 





X 



■J- 



* i 



*& 






fS* *>ZL * ±Z -5 



r 







TRUE COPY 



Feb. 5, 1963 



Gentlemen: 

Would you please advise the name a, 
the publisher and distributor of the booklet entitled 
of Deceit" by the Honorable J. Edgar Hoover. 



ddress of 
asters 



I want the distribution and sale (at cost) in San Diego 
of this and other "Anti-Commy" literature distributed thru* ,the. 
( Sup't. of Documents where I am a subscriber. Thanx . 



/s/ 



h6 
hlC 



1672 Burton St, San Diego 11, Calif. 



/ 



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( TH IS SI DE OF CARP ISf 



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^/o£j77^ XW& 



February 21, 1963 



Mr J _ 

?3Qu^mm9K j*&enue_ 

Stanton, California 



b6 - 
b7C 



Dear Mr, 



~ m m " 
o CD 

.00 g -&* 

* - » - -=s 
o _ t; 



I have; received your letter Of February 13tb and I certainly 
appreciate the kind sentiments you ejqaressed relative to my efforts as - •' - 
Director of the FBI. It is my hope that our future endeavors will warrant 
your continued support and approval. I want to thank you for your interest 
in my book and for furnishing me your comments and observations.. 

While I would like to be of assistance to you, the FBI is 
strictly an investigative agency .of the Federal Government and neither 
makes evaluations nor draws conclusions as to the character or integrity 
of any organization, publication or individual. Information contained in 
our files must be maintained as confidential in accordance with regulations 
of the Department of Justice. In view of this, I am sure you Will understand 
why I cannot comment concerning the John Birch Society and trade with. Cuba. 
7 In addition, I hope you will not infer either that we do or do not have inf orma~ 
tion in our files regarding your inquiries.. _ 

It is always reassuring to hear from citizens who demon- 
strate an awareness of the evils of communism and who desire to combat 
this threat to our freedoms. 1 am enclosing some material on the general* 
topic oi~communiom. which I hope you will find to be of help in connection 
; with your desire to learn more about this menace. "• £bu may also wish to read 
my new book, "A Study of Commiihism. yT - Tins workis a comprehensive study 
* of the development and expansion of communism throughout the^wojld. It 
jy ,should^|java^I^^a6ji3jff local library. - 

***" ' ' Vf ** t'm I ":■ , *. Steoerel3r yours ' 



0*3 



poison ,_»-_.,. 
Belmont, ~-L 

Ca?per __ 
CsSfahant l~ 

ContatJ ^ M- 
DeLoqcb -— 
Evans ,_. T _ n _ m 
Gale , 



w ^^| 






ILEdgauHodw 

Jbhr\ .Edgar Hoover 
- Los Angeles - Enclosure^ £? ■- ■. ^ "*»£*■—* 



S ^A * - L °s Angeles - Enclosure^? l •% -W &&* 

l^^^Emfoo^iw^^ 68 " (5) , (See iist^of enclosures and NOTE next 




> ; 



o 



Mr. 



be 

'b7C 



Enclosures (5) 

An American 1 s Challenge 

Let'.s Fight, Communism- Sanely I 

4-1-61 LEB Ihtrpductioh 

4-17^62 filter nal Security statement ., < ' -' 

Ttie Current Cbmmunist.Thr.eat ;, 

NOTJjE:, . Correspondent; is not identifiable in Bufiles. 



»,.; 



-2- 



^ 



V " 



o 






Q 

7801 Davmor Avenue 

Stanton, California 

Febuary 13, 1963 



Dear Mr. Hover, 

I would like you to answer a few questions for me, I read your 
book "Rasters Of Deceits I found the answers to a lot of my questions in 
your book but some it did not answer • Is the John Birch Society communist? 
I hear so many pros and cons about it and half the time they are trying to 
inpeach somebody. 

1 have a lot of faith in you and think you are one man that 
America can look up to, I am one of those Americans. 

I would like to know what you think about the black market goods 
we are sending to Cub^? I. personaly think they are aiding the cause of 
cummunistiom throu^i out the world* I know my country isn't setting on 
their hands but I can v t understand their actions* 

T am an ex-Marine of world war two and have two boys and a girl. 
1 1 teach them about America and what it stands for. I last both legs fitting Srr V^\ 
for my country so I fill closer, to it than some people I hear talking about it. ' 

One thing I don't the schools teach enough about America,* I thinfc 
you will agree. I would. like to see the country free of cummunist and dope so 
the children can grow up free to go to the school they please. 

I I don't think the Negro is getting a fair shake in the south 
and it isn't good for a country that teaches freedom. I grew up in the south £gid 

k\£k. I th§rr weiftr into the Marines and wa§ 



being white I excepted it as a young** 






*asaa/ 



^ u stationed, in California and then sw the difference M treatmeirL^pf the Negro* >&' 

^cA 2 'PPT&'tS " ' * ftB m 1963 ik&r 

* "' ------ - - - ~ - - you 



^h^ff^'J^/^P If y° u *? n4 ^ ime * ould y° u Please answer my letter? 1 realize 

must get many letter but really would appreciate an< Answer. Ke ep"\tp^te^ 
/}¥WVL work and hope to hear from you soon. 



Very truly yours 




?&r& 




6 



& 



* 



-/' ; 



is z.^jov*iy-^ ~ 



n\ 



February 25, 1963 



n\ 



Mr. 



^ HOOBE355S55: *£&S&?~ - — " 
v Tuscaloosa, Alabama 



Dear .Mr* 




Your letter of February 18th has been received and 
I want you to know how much I appreciate your kind remarks con- 
cerning "Masters of Deceit. " _> 

Although I would, like to be of seryice, the agreement 
you mentioned does not come within the province of this Bureau and 
it would be most inappropriate for me to comment as you requested. 
I regret X am unable to help you but trust you will understand my u ** 
position. ~ 



;toyou. 



Enclosed is sdme literature I hope will be of interest 




MAILEQ.30 

F£E251963 

COMM-FBI 



Sincerely yours, 
3. Edsar Hoover 



K 




Oi 



#■ 




rf 



Enclosures (4) k 

~ " The Current CCommunist Threat 

-'- " Communism--The Incredible Swindle A$) 

j\ % Time of Testing \¥W±S* 

■'X&S? \£ h ¥&**& ^bple^Can Help Defeat Communism ' r 

_ 1 - Birmingham - Enclosure '•-•'■*'. x ^\0 

•Z NOTJEJJ ^Correspondent jpote in 1961 an<$ ^qu&ed aSout AmeyJ^il^Future, , 
3$gW> WHis-tcotiimunicatioiiHvas answer$cj|j^2lr61 at wJ^h.tMe he was advised 
*c me Bureau was strictly an investigative agenc^otme^e^r^iitGovernment 
^ and did not make such evaluations. ;o * tfS£* u JW^iZw&® w 



Tolson 
Befmoftt « 

Caspar JL 
Callahan .. 
Conrad .*- 
DeLoach . 
Evens 
Gale* 
Bosen 

Tovel 
Trottex 
Teie. J Kbo;ja 
- Holmes, , 



fc maiuboomQ teletype wit O 




r*. 



iW< 



-^n?—^ 



*Y 



o 







1704-5th Avenue 
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 
February 18, 1963 



J&aspcr< — - 
, Callahan- 
'Conrad— 

r — Evans, — *- 
1 Mr. Gale-— - 

Mr. Rosen 

i Mr. Sullivan- 

\ Mr. Tavci 

j Mr- Trotter— 
i Tele. Ro<> m — ■ 
['Miss Holmes- 
. Miss Gandy- 



Mr. J, Jbxigar Hoover, Director 

F.B.I. 

Justice Department 

Washington, D.C. ' 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

My American History and current affairs class in school has 
just completed a course in Communism, using your booh/p Masters 
fi£ Deceit, a s the basic text. * 

One of the main points of our study was the spread of written 
propaganda through out the free world, by the C. P. U.S. A. I 
have just recently entered a subscription to the magazine 

USSR , published 'by the Soviet, embassy in this country in 
agreement that the u.S. embassy in Russia will oublish the 
American magazine, "Amerika. I would like to know, as would 
my classmates, your openion of this agreement. Do you think 
that I have done the right thing, or rather was it a sound 
decision to place my subscription, to this communist puplica- 
ti,on ? Do you think that in Russia our American M aSazine is 
allowed to publish as freely as do the Soviets in our country? *fo 
±f they are do you think that the Russian people actually W 



you 
have access to our publication? 




*> 



1 realize that the F.B.I, is purely an investigative organ of' 
our government, andas such_ would not have an openion toward 
this magazine, but 1 would like to have your own personal open- 
ion on this subject. — ' " - ; .— — 

Thank you very much, Mr. Hoover,, and allow me to say that I 
feel that your book is indeed an important weapon in the rfight 
against communism and It would be very wise f ov* all '^eedkm 
loving Americans to be armed with it. *S l \i '* J _ 



R1nrsf=?rft1v 




he 

hlC 



*-8'S&> 



12 FEB ^1963 





«. '>*.<* 



oi'r 



OMIONAL FORM NO. 10 
5010-104 



5' 



UNITED STATES G07J"CNMENT 

MemoranWum 



fo : DIRECTOR, FBI 







date: 2/25/63 



FROM 



subject: 



SACjffiALTIMORE (94-382) (P) 



O 



HOWARD EJ^ROW 
Assis tant' Superintendent . ~ , 

SWe^f~DjTawar^~ 3fo/4fl..EVU 
DepSrtmentf of Public Instruction 
Research (Crime Records)' 



^ Re B^l 



ltimore airtel to Bureau 12/21/62. 



, . Inquiry at Dr. R0W"S office, State Department of Public 
Instructions, Dover* Del., revealed that Dr. ROW'S manuscript 
concerning study of Communism is ready for the printer. Dr. ROW'S 
secretary advised that a copy of the first edition received has 
been reserved for the Bureau and will be made available to the 
Baltimore Office as soon as it is received in Dr. ROW'S Office. 

A copy of the publication will be furnished to the 
Bureau when received. 



^ 



(3/-Bureau 
1 -Baltimore 
TLLtbjt 



1/ KMMWWWW Mff*********** MMMMMtp 

6 FEB h( 1963 } 






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Toj $AC # Oklahoma City 
Promt* Director, J?BI 



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GUYMON, OKL£SQM& 

HlimdHtCORRESPONI)ENdE AND *QtmS) 
BODED $-8-63 



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Enclosed are two copies o£ a self -explanatory letter. IfQiS 
Captioned iridi^jtol alcaig witii two copies of his enclosure* 



Contact JM*[ 



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ac 




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O 






fS~* *pt »«-■* — *" *K* 



and thank him for his interest in my pook, 

advise Aim that I am unable to grant him perrnlssi oa tei&ujtiffiffg B jages 

from this tjook due to the many requests of this;natu^| >&af 4t*jg§J|ji»- 

For ybtir inform ation and assistance, refer to. Bureau' tett er 
to von dated 6-20-42 captioned i 



»mgwi? ' "*-^ - 






Submit results of your contact vrfti 
tiriopr above caption, no later than 3-8-03. 



to reach Bureau, 



Callahan , 
Jonwd _ 
>$Loach l , 
Vans. ^ 
old -■_" 
■osen _=, 
luUlvtm « 

otte* 



Bncldeures(4) 



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irGF:blc 16) Ir^' 



e M6rrdLl^i§b%5(JSS diemo da#fT2 r 2fc63, captioned 
Reques ^o,<agagtet> Baft ts of "-Masters bf r t)eceit>' 





return to :mm0%m¥w'-> iU±^ 



MAIL BOOM G_r TELETYPE UfHT O 



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BOX 112 610 E. FIRST ST. 

GUYMON, OKLAHOMA 
Telephone 219 and 757 




Mfc Tolso! 




sper* — . 
Mr.lCMJahan- 

M/^DeLoachd 
•. Evans,- — 
Jr. Gale~~^- 
Mr. Rosens- 
Mr. SttUivan- 




KNQLOSUPxE 



Guymon , Oklahoma 
February 13,1963 

Mr. J.Edgar Hoover, 

Office of the Director, 

United States Department of Justice, 

Washington, D,.C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover: - 

It is with a great deal of reluctance that I write you again, 
after receiveing such a nice acknowledgment of my letter of 
February 5 from your Secretary Helen W. Gandy, because I know 
you are such a very busy man. But, as you state in the last 
paragraph of the photo copy attached, "Never has there been a 
time when we (Americans) have so much need for one another". 
My reason for writing this letter is brief; I found a 500 pocket 
book of your book "Masters of Deceit" ( I had written ~ previously 
to find the name of the Publishers) and I had previously had a 
copy of this book and loaned it out and coihuchd not get ano^herl 
But I found this one and it had stuck in my mind from my first 
reading of this wonderfully true book the cold facts of what Would 
happen to us all under Communism. I photo copied these pages in 
.the crude fashion of which I have sent you -a copy. What I want to 
I ask you is this; would you object, if I made ^so^^mo^e^cp.pies^lxke*- 
this to send to friends-or -anyone- -I-would" cafe "to, ~to show wfaht 
would happen to us under Communism? I do not wish to do this 
without your permission. I plan to order as many of the 500 
pocket books as my limited budget allows to give to friends and 
acquaintances. But we must enlighten the people of America to 
this Communist menance. 

I will await your earliest convenient reply. 
ATTACHED 

Slncftrfilv. r~\ 




8 



v<*A * 



ir*^ 



^StlpsS^oftUBj perhaps the Only man inV&sfef?gtqn-ln whom I have 
comjhlete x fa$th/ij|d J confidence in this fight^ajg$nst Communism 



b^/04277 



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OF DECEIT 



/ 



L EDGAR HOOVER 

' Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 

JLJnder communism, a tiny minority, perhaps ten to twenty 
menTwould rule the United States. An open dictatorship called 
the "dictatorship of the proletariat" would bo established. (£or 
a aefloition of "dictatorship of the proletariat/' see the Glos- 
sary, page 323.) Communists, in all their teachings, make this 
point clear. The capital city, as one communist leader pointed 
out, would be moved from Washington, D.C., to a large in- 
dustrial center, probably Chicago. National as well^as state 
and local governments would be eliminated. "Soviets" (mean- 
ing councils) would be formed throughout the nation. These 
would consist of local Communist Party henchmen who would 
depose and probably liquidate your mayor, chief of .police, 
clergymen, and leading citizens. 

The Constitution, and all our laws, would be abolished. If 
you owned productive property you would be arrested as an 
"exploiter," hauled before a revolutionary court, and sentenced^ 
to a concentration camp— that is f if you convinced the "judge" 
you were worth saving at all. All property used in production 
would be confiscated, thus leading ultimately to total com- 
munization, meaning'State ownership. This confiscation would 
include your home, business, bank deposits, and related 
personal possessions. These would "belong to everybody." 
You have no "right" to own them under the communist 
scheme. 

The revolution would affect every man, woman, and child 
uv America. Communists do not propose to remodel our gov- 
ernment or retain any part of it. They would tear it to the 
ground; destroy all opposition, and than create t. wm feme** 
mcnt, an American provxaee m the SorUst wtsarSd ssspfe*. 3fceir 
recipe for action? The 1W17 Soviet re^utta^***^^ 
;mode!^e«»d^ 
the claim: 

The principles upon.trhleh a Soviet America would be or- 
ganized would be the tamo, in ©very respect, a* tho»o which 
gaided the Soviet Union, 

William Z. Foster, long-time head of the communist move- 
ment in our country, has boasted that the communist revolu- 
tion, after the aotual seizure of power, would "develop even 
more swiftly" than the Russian. 

All industry would be nationalized and farms takeo away 
from their owners. A small businessman is just as guilty as a 
large businessman; both must be liquidated. Rents, profits, 
and insurance would be abolished. Countless occupations, 
tanned by the co mmunis ts as "useless and parasitic/* would 



v 



be ended. Here is a part of their list: wholesalers, jobbers, real / 
estate men and stockbrokers, advertising specaatists,, traveling I 
salesmen, lawyers, "whole rafts of ^veratnent bureaucrats,} 
police, clericals, and sundry capitalist quacks, fakers, 
grafters." The communists have a special disdain for 1* 
?erhaps it is because there will be no need for lawyers wl 
there are no rights to defend. At any rate, Foster has 
The pest of lawyers will be abolished." 

Action would be drastic, immediate, and without a] 
An armed "Red Guard" would enforce the orders of Pi 
henchrnenV&otels, country clubs, and swfoming pools wuld| 
be use3 for'f!* jmeSt d$ '"workers/* meaning, inmost cases, 
Party bosses. Th#*wkingman in the mines, factories, and 
mills would be told to work certain hours for certain wages. 
Labor unions, as we know them, would be obliterated. All 
such organizations would be owned and operated by the com- 
munist government, and no laborer would be permitted 
organize a union or to strike against his "government." 

The press would be muzzled, free speech forbidden, and 




in- 
to M 



•<! 



/complete conformity demanded. If yoju expressed an opinion 
contrary to the Party line, you* should haveikribwn better. and 
your "disappearance" would serve as a lesson for others. Fear 
becomes an enforcement technique. Movies, radio, and tele- 
vision would be taken over by the government as agencies 
for government propaganda. Churches would probably not be * 
closed immediately, but they would be heavily taxed, their If 
property seized by the state, and religious schools liquidated. ^ 
Clergymen would be required to accept the Party^ line,/*God $ 
does not exist. Why worship Kim?" say the communists. Chil- £ 

$ dren would be placed in nurseries and special indoctrination , n 
schools. Women, boast the communist, would be relieved , of H 
housework. How? Huge factory and apartment-house kitchens ^ 
would be set up, so that women would.be 1 "free" to work, in V^ 
factories and mines along with the men.' ' jjf 

This picture of a communist America is not overdrawn. > 
•Here are the words of William Z. Fosters >£ $& 

€ ■- ? 
Under the dictatorship all the capitalist parties— Republican, Jfr 
Democratic, Progressive, Socialist, eta.— will'* be liquidate^ '%/ 
the Communist party functioning alone as the Parry o£ the, \ 
toiling masses. Likewise, will be dissolved all other organiza- 
tions that are political props of the" bourgeois rule, inducing 
chambers of commerce, employers' associations, rotary* ciubs,^ 
American Legion, Y.M.C.A. and such fraternal orders as;the " 
Masons, Odd Fellows, Elks, Knights of Columbus, etix 



Under this schedule many Americans are eligible for Uqui- 'I&. 
fdation not once but several times, depending on tneir present .<gf 
freely chosen affiliations and social interests. %^ „ } **W$ 

Communism is many things: an economic systeffl>->arrJhi- j&, 
losophy, a political creed, a psychological conditioning, an M 
educational indoctrination, a directed way ofllife. Communists jjjj 
"want to'conUoreverything: where you live, where you work, 2d 
what you are paid, what you think, what streetcars you ride $? 
(or whether you walk), how your children are educated, £# 
what you may not and must read and write. The most minute Jjre 
details, even the time your alarm clock goes off inthe morning i 

or the amount of cream in your coffee; are subjects for state^'U^ 
supervision. They want to make a "communist man," a me%! \% 
chanical puppet, whom they can train to do as the Party do-, >*J 
sires. This is the ultimate, and tragic, aim of communism. 

These statements are confirmed, day after day, by docu- 
mented reports from areas where communists haye already 
taken over: Hungary, East Germany, Bulgaria, Poland, Rou- 
mania, Czechoslovakia, Red China, and other areas' x .* 

When you read such reports, do not think of them as some- 
thing happening in a far-off land.™ Remember, always, that "it 
could happen here" and that there are thousands of people 
in this country now working in secret to make it happen here. 

But also, thank God, there are millions of Americans who 
oppose them. If we open our eyes, inform ourselves, and work 
together, we can keep our country free. 



\ But most of all, I have* been guided by ffie tK^nSfST 
lions of loyal Americans everywhere and in all walks ofllife. 
Never has there been a Hm* when we havA so muc h ne ed for 
pllfi anfttha And we must never forget th at if our government 
is to remain free it needs the help. of every patriotic man. 
woman, ana cnild. " 



^•Y 



Mrt>-*-*M/u> 



Washington, D. C. 
December, 1957 



O'TIONAI fO«M NO, 10 ^^\ 

UNITED STATES GOVE^ \ENT 

Memorax^utn 







TO 



Mr. DeLoach 



date: 2-26-63 



tf from : D. C. Morrell^Vl 



f 



subject: 



REQUEST TO REPRINT PARTS 
OF^MASTERS OF DECEIT" 




Tolson . 
Belmont . 

Mf ; 

ytfasper 

XCallahan 

/ Conrad ^ 

A DeLoach* 

Evans _ 

Gale _ 

Rosen mm 

Sullivan , 

Tavel _ 




Trotter . 

Tele. Room ■ 
Holmes «_ 
'Gandy _^, 



To 6 
hlC 



i~ v * ~ m *r *>^ J Vw****<rme»*rH*r 



By letter dated 2-18-63, captioned individual forwarded a photocop^off 
Director's statements contained in pages 6, 7, 8, 9 and last page of foreword of the 
pocket book edition of "Masters of Deceit." He requests permission to have more 
copies made to enable him to send to friends or anyone he would care to, to show 
"what would happen to us under communism." He points out that he plans to order as 
many of the pocket book editions of "Masters of Deceit" as his limited budget allows. 
He advises that the Director is the only man in Washington in whom he has complete 
faith and confidence in this fight against communism. 




By letter dated 2-12-63, over-Miss Gaudy's signature, 
furnished the address of Holt, Rinehart anaWinston, Inc. 

OBSERVATION: 

Although correspondent appears to be sincere in 'his desire-to fight 
communism and while we would normally grant such a request to individuals having a 
good reputation, it is felt that in the present case it would not be in the best interests 
of the Bureau to grant| [permission to reprint sections of "Masters of -Deceit. " 



It is also felt that his request should not be acknowledged by a letter ovei>the Director' s 
signature or over Miss Gandy' s signature since we wrote to him just recently. 



I JCF:blc (2). * 8T ..roT 

^3 I|/BHb3 



^ 



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j REC- 45 





gf FEB 28 J963 




COSB® 



sf 77 ^ 











Mnrrell in TteT.naHi msn)n 

Re: 



2-26-63 



RECOMMENDATIONS: 



(1) That request by 
of Deceit" not be granted. 



be 

b7C 



to reprint sections of "Masters 



(2) That attached airte^ instructing; Oklahoma City to contact 
acknowledging receipt of his letter and advising Kim that the Director is unable to 
grant permission to reprint sections of "Masters of, Deceit" due to ( many requests 1 of 
this nature he receives, be, forwarded. 



%j^ 



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V 






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MAR 28 1963 

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CHANGED TO 



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October 24, 1902 




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Mrs. 



mr *¥n 833j|oJathjGran(LAKenuo 

J U A3 Los An^l^3^#-~Caliiotnla.,\ 



JDear Mra[ 



You* note of October 15th has boon 
received, and I want to thank you for bringing your 
enclosures to my attention* 

if j#a&lgoudi1o£ yoU^^vasdrmV,tftm-w, 
yo^e&joyeoI'lMastersuffifi DAc^l^an^iQiatiyouiwerje" i*- 
-ip x Qfeiri^^jiiH?ar!iaritp reading my new book. 

I am enclosing some literature which I 
trust will be of intefcestvto ybuv - 

Sincerely yours, v 



.♦.^^WluiS 








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Bebaoni— 
Moht\*i- 
Caspar — 
Cauwiari ^ 
Conxad — 
DeLoach «. 
s EVans,^_ 
Gala E; 
Rosen 
SulUvan t 4 
Tuvei - 
Trotter 
Tele- Room 
Holme; 
Gandyi 
/ 



Enclosures (3) 

Diff ctbr^s. speech 10.-9 -62> "An, American 1 s. Challenge 

7~15-62\NBC "Statement on Communism" 

A View of Reality 

NOTE: Buf iles contain no derogatory information concerning correspondent. 

Our lagt out^tpto^tp^lr was dated .12-28-36* It is noted that that out* 

going ma&e no specific references to the material she enclosed which 













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TELETYPE UNIX' 



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TRUE COPY 



Oct 15-1962 



Dear Mr Hoover! 

These' clippings was in our local papers. I am so glad you spoke 
at Veterans meeting at Los Vegas We are fortunate to have a fine 
—.man like you<at the head of our F. B. I. I have read your book 
\_ J "Masters, of Deceit" . I am going to read your latest book this, week: 
v I know 1 will enjoy the latest one. I did the other. Thanks for your 
comments on my last clippings to you. 

God Bless you always. 

Sincerely 



/s/ Mr* 
833 



So Grand ,ave. 
Los Angeles. 
422-A Cal'ifi 



bo 
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Address per envelope: 



jfr Los Angel es. IT 
t> 422-A, Calif. 




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'art It 



."& ' to MAR X MS 



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•Mr, Tolson , i 
for. BeliifoptrtA^ 
Mr. Mohr.J*! 
Mr. Casper.; 
Mr. Callahan 

Mr. C$H>fcfc 
Mr. DorflachJ 
Mr. Efbfls„ 
Mr. Qale__ 
Mr. Rosen..— 
Mr. Sullivan. 

Mr. Tavel 

Mr. Trotter- 
Tele. Room_ 
MJF/LJtokftej 











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, T »,hA*A 1« Angeles Hefald-Examiner /^ v thursdav; Oct.il 1 : 1 9M 







&■ 



* ByDAVID SENTNER 

. LAS VEGAS, Nev.,V6ct. ll^Natiorial commander 
vCharles.L. i Bacph today formally awarded the;William 
^Randqlph^^ the Ameri- 
can Lfjjon convenficm^ttere to*? — — L1 — ^ — — - 

the department* "of* Perinsyl* 
/vania. "' " ;".\*^ ,* "' \ 

• ;}lri> presenting', the" trophy 

'Officially to \ v f enrisyiyania 

-Department, Cphimahde? 

^George Bruno from the con- 
vention /platform, fCommand- 
er Bacon referred to\its r^'vi- 

j^tal significance " V * 
| ;; V" W»?S* 16TH : TIME' , '; 
? * ,& ajso pald^tribuSe io^the 
|PerinsyiyanIa^ Department of 
phe^American p Legion, having 

* won "the honor ' v forTthe/*six- 
!] tleenth' time sincere trophy 
J ^S;fiist«'dciiated>In 1938 by 
.^ttie late 'f^pus}pu6lisfier.: , 

| ^wluisurnt ^Randolph \*Hearst) 
/Jr.v ,>'edit6r : iri^hi*et =i: ;of * .the 
|^eafst?'newspapers,; sent con- 
^gratulatibns' -to, 'Commander 
fBriino ^'f or :hfsV department's 



(/outstanding contribution to 
Americanism." 

vin these crucial days of 
,the ,eold war, being an 
American must be more 
than an accepted habit," 
<Hearst messaged. "Your 
department, has distin- 
guished itself by positive 
action." 

"Hearst particularly compli- 
mented the winning; , Legion 
Department forthe following: 
\i Creating "Bells Across the 
^Nation" on Patriots' /Day, 
' Continuous \ educational 
t campaign against Commu* t 
nist propaganda. 
JThe Hearst ^Americanism 
Trophy consists of a gold per- 
petual clock mounted' on a 
marble base with Legion 
syiabbla^i^' 



c^. 




__ '' Vi J . ^-United; frets lnlernMIonakT*U"phtfq> \ 

Comttr^^arie^tL fi aeon; left; preseriis pnxe^to^George/F^ 







R[E#;©:Rf E1R 




I ST.. Edgar jHoover ;remihds*meof <a high abbot 

, l fa a/moiiastery *of "gunmen/ He cworksVin ;dignity 

^^si^nce, ; and yet, ,bn ^he*occasiohVw^eri ,he '.isl 

I, s recognized;in public; ^Hoover is°Mendly ;and warm}! 

5 .Then, back;to;th'eVmoriastery arid the work of eiiardi 

' ing'themtiohfroriii^^ 



saboteurs the spies, the^jbig-mfer-, 
state; criminals, and thfe; xosaM^oi- 
brass knuckles. . ; % ;: ;>V-'^ 
He lias been^he Jbosisof ihe : Fed- ! 
eral Bureau of Investigation forml^ 
fmost 40 years. In that .time, he : has ' 
; become asi expert : on communilin, 
.. , ; inits *mostblatant> and r mbst subtle* 

.forms. At* the -'age -df 67;*the bachelor "fchieftam'of 
xneru-men.i^ finding ^me to write bdoH n ^f^ 
., , .This*is-goodi because what he wnteis iinountsi 
' *° ^ sharing of his knowledge with all of Vs/ Twentf 
years after his first book, "Persons ia™**™" 




■? a ^;'!?tosta» ; pf Deceit;" the story » of- communism 1 
:in,..tonerica.-'"- , ■'>' "j ' ' "* ' "' s"* ••. /^-.-t^"": 




•who would like to know, the history of communism; 

*P'*k ^fflr'ushchev, in adflitioniJtheloB 
?£ WX. ^e7Ketfs are doing iri^th^UriifediStatesl 
the book, is/nourishing-readirie., V * V'vV *"<*"*;;;' ' 




knqw- 

people- ^ _____ 

f." JYMenithe,Russiaris~70M^ 
..ffift?Jtea«tqns, 135,000 ,machihe,guris, one billib j^a'oi? j 
lars worth of beavy;machine^,a0OTmercharitiKipsM 

Sf On 'mnff.nirnraft ~ ».___'_? 'onnn -.-.:._.-..i , -_ '.i_.^__:__ *_•;£•-;». J 



< ...,;Trucks?.40q;O0O. of_^^^ 
. e »g?, n , e .S5,and,lQp;000 'railroad ,wheels;an^jixiei5<3M 
yes; : jeeps. ^FBtyil^tt^dsVbf^iaiSeiaiaa^vlfM 
wkepted •ruffians;;500;000f,tons of :'fallsiand* ; 600;60O 1 
■W&Pf- ^, emi( %l -Broductsj, incjwhng rauW Tmed$ 
• cffi? -Jo fkeep^RUssiaris ;alive. V 4S^J^- r si''^ W$ 

_*_fc£^..&^ 

;telephonesyand .150. million; wards':dfWc'6t't6riTand 
woolens, 17jmilli6ft .«_$_££ .; ** " "' *"fi "7 ~-7 . T"! 
\>.. ^J^ffi^jri-^w^EBffl^t^&^/jiras orie-of 







imely Wa u tion by J . fcdgar W oover * 



| * J.\Edgar^H6oyer, the ioterndsV aur 

* ,thbrity ; ^n^^mmUnist hunting, floes ' 
4 no tvbeligye^he pursuit j6f, subyej&iyes; is 
J a suitably itask for ^ ; privateVciti2eris,^lrir 
& Ws^riyalyable ; ;nevy ^x>pk ? /",A:gitudy : of 

* Gpr^unism^;fe ;has sbmet ;c&tipns 
; -thslt ^[-meaning ''/but^ll-|L^s^ pa^Erjr; 

qts pughteto ^^ead;\vith ( ckre. Hejfeiare 

* -* '^Jn^eaifrig with 'commuh&m} ci'tK 
;z0ris ^shbuia/ref raihvf roiri /making; ^pri- 




~ ^garaing; ilcqmm^ tbt H fuf. J a 

^ nished ^the Jp^^^e ^checkii^^ . ' 

data;|Kpul3i : be aef tftq drained ahyesti^ , 

V^^f -- -fe?lWI^ ^SM* r fe^ may neven 
-Vjeopajft^ ... » ' 



innocent as#jdqitify;our e%mie% , 

V jhe responsibnityior euriailing;^f)^l ; '! 
\6%i}ainb is pne^for^le^als * 

, ;1#> ^^tUu^^rauffionties- t aHiHg : ;|yith 
4he, \steadfast ^co-operation ;b£ ^yery 
loS^h citizen,.^- ; ' ^ ;, / V; r 

'^Reckless Charges against a^diyidUT ; 
f?Js$|m(i^ 
lure , of cpmmunism^and :the exten^f 



v*j,«jw*i5i wwuiutjf ;am\sug<-' xuuciiyauor'-j 

H To,o^ 

"in&scr^ : 

views /are ^unpopular -or; j^efely^iffer ; 



.1 rom-thpse p^h| jnajqrit^' 
uficatidmoficpmmuriisfhr 



diyid^ig: ; 





^s*qr4ra$^^ 
f .^ipn ^h^;ma^: fcofrig to ^Kmr&itm-,. 

' found^racMfe^^^ 

**mdrS jfari^inflnrifliYalV na'ft Aff^Af-^A^lA 



^ ;^fe^- is^^irgfn^4to^ ^saidgrj; 
^h^|u^c^|Bu| ?hei| % ,o%LfUr||iei\ 
Hoqvenieounsshr vV ^ ; ^ ' 








'ii "st'* 4 *-*'-v < i v .*y*f v st^*^^i^« < 4 




y / 



^ v'* / L 




In this columning busi- 
ness, you get to know 
many public personalities. 
Some are .always under- 
standing of their need to 
use their influence and po- 
sitions for the greatest 
common welfare. I have 
found my gdod friend J. 
Edgar Hoover a man of all 
these qualities. In addi- 
tion, in his field, he is the 
greatest scientist of all So 
I asked the director of the 
Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation to take the measure 
of danger of the Commu- 
nist movement in the 
United States. Here is his 
reply. -.Victor Riesel 

Leading members of the * 
Communist hierarchy 
have never minimized the 
significance they attach 
to the Communist nucleus 
in this country. Shortly 
before his death in Mos- 
cow last year, William Z. 
Poster, then chairman 
emeritus of the Commu- 
nist Party, U.S.A., said: 

"The CPUSA todav is 
potentially, if not actually, 
stronger than it ever was 
in history, because, great 
Socialist countries of the 
world are marching for- 
ward to greater and great- 
er victories and the Unit- ] 
ed States is bound to re- i 
flecY'this^wona-wiae ad- 
vance of socialism." 



BY JOHN EDGAR HOOVER 



port. Communist fronts. 
Through these tactics, ) 
Communist strength can 
be greatly enhanced. In 
addition, ideological culti- 
vation in Marxism-Lenin- 
ism makes members po- 
tential recruits for Soviet 
espionage. 

The party is always 
staunchly loyal to Soviet 
Russia, a fact which 'is re- 
fleeted in its shifting 
line. In September, 1961, 
the Worker in an editorial 



Not long ago, Benjamm 
J. Davis, national secretary 
of the Communist Party, 
U.S.A., in the course of a 
radio appearance made a 
statement to the effect 
that "... the Communist 
Party in America is poten- 
tially the largest of all po- 
litical parties . . " 

At the Soviet Commu- 
nist Party congress last 
fall, Nikita Khrushchev 
gave his own assessment 
of his organization's 
branch 'office in the. Unit- 
ed States. Admitting that 
party membership was not 
numerically great, he stat- 
„ ed: "One can say, using 
the words of the folk prov- 
erb: 'It's a small .unit of 
..weight, but it's valuable/' " 
""""Why is it valuable?' 



r 




Hoover. 



Domestic Communists, 
] like other Communist con- 
1 spirators, ate absolute re- 
4 alists. They kftow they can 
never hope to gain power 
through the "elective proc- 
ess. They concentrate, 
therefore, on efforts to "(I) 
agitate and propagandize, 
(2) infiltrate legitimate, 
non -Commun ist ^gajato- 
tioriS, ' (d) 1 create and sup- 



dafflfmsjgg a ^ permanen t 
ban on nuclear* explosions. 
.This paper hit the 'street 
just hours before the. So- 
viets announced tHe re- 
sumption of nuclear tests. 
One week later the Work- 
er carried four articles 
justifying the Soviet Un- 
ion's action. 

A primary concern of 
domestic Communists to- 
day is the infiltration of 
non-Communist 'ranks. 
"With infinite subtlety and' 
patience, they hope to in- 
fluence American opinion 
to fit a collectivist mold. 
The process of opinion 
subversion is developed 
with such diabolical skill 
that even today a surpris- 
ing number of victims are 
drawn into the active pro- 
motion of causes which 
advance Communist' aims 
and ideas. 



Such persons often re 
main totally ignorant "" 
the fact that they are 
themselves subject to , 
Communist manipulation. 

The Communist ^move- 
ment is currently* Sojfcen-, 
trating great: effort *n the 
youth field: *Part? propa- 
gandists, skilled' in pro- 
moting the Communist 
line, are ^triving*t£%in 
access' to campuses*across 
the country and in|so do- 
i ng hop_e. to gain an aura 
oV respectability.- 



^" ; 



In their efforts to broad- | 
en opportunities to exploit * 



college-age y o u t h, , they 
recently announced the 
creation of a lecture bu- , 
reau.:,Plans;for the crea-, 
tioh of' Marxist discus-," 
sion groups for- teen-age 
youngsters are Being pro- 
moted and party members 
have "papered" gathering 
p 1 a c e s of young people 
with, thousands pf copies 
of their unlabeled propa- * 
ga nda shee ts 



'The "subversive, js - f ulljf | 
aware of the idealism*:o£ ' 
youth. H^knowsihe value : 
of exploiting jippealing^if 
controversial subjects; „in\ 
such a fray/j&at^he .al- 
ways gives ii\e[ impression 
of being Von tHe -si5e lot 
the angels.^lt is Kis v osten- 
sible support of Jdeal- V 
istic causes whicH, so ,pf- f 
ten entraps -the) unsophjsv 
ticated ^otithV arid^u t n s 
him into a wiUihg;puppet 
manipulated by* Commu-, 
nist masters. * 

What, is ihe ^measure of 
danger we face ; 4 from, the* 
■ Communist, Movement? : 
Entirely* apart;from;£he v 
deadly cl a h-g e'r of espiof 
nage activities operating, 
under the cover of* every; 
Russian-run establishment, 
in the United, States, ;w^ 
must recognize .the fact , 
that a powerful" forefgn; 
government. Has, 1 at this 
moment, ah advance d«F * 
tachment within our'bor-. * 
ders. *'*.*■, 

This group has no cloak v 
of legitimacy: Some c<£ , 
horts from* ;thi$; ^detach- , 
ment currently/are^striyr : 
ing to infiltrate vital; seg^. ; 
.ments of our society.fThis, ; 
detachment stands behind^ 
the efforts ' of T other\.conf: 
-spirators. in4he ( ifeatt|inRtai 
to clamp the iron control, 
of r commuhis^rbn ;ourfsjs-: 
ter ren«hhcs^ ! 




But < even: {more,; deadl^; •* 
than these Jsfthe;Co)nmu),4 
nist capacity; ^to pervert; ; 
our thinking -and ;j destroy v ; v 
the s pi r 1 t u,a I -supports ,/ - \ 
which form the^ioundai; £ 
tibn of ;pur freedom^ ^/^ | : 
/• Will jure, ^s^c^^Sto -J: 
opinion ' subversioh?;^Cah ,; 
we be changed frbm;f orth^,„| 
right, self-reliaht,.ielftre- ;•; 
spectihg American citizens £ 
into irresolute, ^halfhear^Vf 
ed, irresponsible \$&$fc ? 
lings willing, to ■comp^ C 
mise away the" freedoms; \ 
for which so* many-lba^ * 
fough^<died^ : ^r^:i 
lie s', the m easur e ,0 jou r,*; ' 
danger. :; ' r ^v^T^'^i' 



v w 



Q 



*4- 







* l.:^ AJ*- " -JW - » -^ tf ' t!iv- w;i^ * "' i -— Mi * ' ■ ; -». ■. .. >■ 



*¥*r* — s*-r*- 



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BROADCASTER ^ 



The Voice of Teen World International 



Volume 2 Number 8 



OCTOBER 1962 



TEEN WORLD TO INFORM 

by Dr. Roy McKeown, President 

It's time America knows the facts . • . and Teen World is dedicated to gjyjng 
you this information. As a teen service organization, we will be informing, challenging 
and inspiring teenagers and adults around the world with the responsibility that is ours. 

Many teenagers have asked the question: "What can I do to stop the indecency 
that there is on radio, television etc.?" In answer to these many questions, we would 
like to suggest the following "Teenagers* Decency Campaign." 

(continued page 8) 




ALSO IN THIS ISSUE: 

. YOUTH GUIDANCE — Page 2 

. INTRODUCING NEW TEEN WORLD SPORTS EDITOR 

• TEEN LEADERSHIP — Page 4 
. SENATOR FRANK CARLSON SPEAKS — Page 5 

• AROUND THE TEEN WORLD — Page 6 



Page 3 



YOUTH GUIDANCE: GANGS - UNDER-PRIVILEGED 





-—■J 07 




Under the direction of Chaplain Paul Arthur, the Youth 
Guidance Department has grown to be one of the highlights 
in Teen World. Working with gang members and teenagers 
who are in trouble with the law is one of the very important 
phases of this ministry. Cities all across the United States are 
reporting the need of some program to work in the field of 
Underprivileged Teenagers. 



A model club house has been 
initiated in Los Angeles, lo- 
cated in a gang-infested area, 
in which Mayor Yorty has 
stated there are over 50,000 
misguided teenagers. From 
month to month reports will 
be coming your way on the 
progress of the Youth Guid- 
ance Department. 




JLA." 





Assisting in Teen World's Youth Guidance Depart- 
ment, George "Stub" McLaird, newest member of 
the staff, is now making his headquarters in Los 
Angeles. Having had experience in working with 
teenagers in trouble with the law and gang members 
in Chicago, "Stub" returns to his hometown to help 
continue developing Teen World's Youth Guidance 
program. We welcome him! 








SINGING SPRINGS 

all vcar family rcsort 

CHRISTIAN PICNIC CENTER 

23350 Angeles Forest Highway 

Singing Springs, Palmdale, Calif. 

Mountain Wonderland midway between 

La Canada and Palmdalo 



ROCKYIEW MILK FARMS 
Downey, California 

Compliments of 
J. J. McCANDLESS 

Phone SP 3-4771 



Page 2 




Watson Spoehtra 



INTRODUCING NEW TEEN WORLD SPORTS EDITOR 

Watson Spoehtra is a well known Detroit sports writer, 
having written for the Detroit News since 1945, and before 
that, for the Detroit Free Press. He is the Michigan sports 
editor for the Associated Press, covering the Detroit Tigers 
in the American League and the Detroit Lions in the National 
Football League. He has covered half a dozen Rose Bowl 
games as well as the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, 
Australia. He is the official scorer for the American League 
in Detroit and the Detroit correspondent for Sporting News, 
a national baseball weekly. 

Mr. Spoehtra became a Christian in, 1958, and is a 
member of the First Presbyterian Church \ of Birmingham, 
Michigan. He is active in the Felloivship of Christian Athletes 
and other organizations that permit believers of Jesus Christ to have, fellowship while 
competing in, organized sports. We welcome Mr. Spoehtra to the Teen? World staff and 
also as a member of the Board of Governors of Teen World. Following is his first 
article for Teen World. 

Big league baseball arrested new attention in 1962 with the exciting play of Felipe 
Alou, outfielder for the San Francisco Giants. In one sequence, ~Alqu connected for 
nine straight hits to inspire the Giants *in~their season-long challenge to the Los Angeles 
Djodgcrs. He batted over .300. 

"Whether I hit .300 or .220, I do the best I can for the glory of God," Felipe says. 

The night before he played his first big league game, Alou knelt alone in his hotel 
room and gave his life to God, A Christian friend had sent an encouraging cablegram 
from his native Dominican Republic. - Reading the message, Felipe sank to his knees 
and asked God to take over his life. 

"Alou's simple trust in God is stimulating to many Christians in baseball," declares 
Jerry Kindall, second baseman of the Cleveland Indians. 

Felipe speaks to many church groups, telling what God means to him. 

"The biggest day of my life was when I became a Christian," he* says, shrugging 
off the personal honors bestowed in baseball. 

LENIN SAID: If we can destroy the patriotic pricle of one generation 'of your people, 
we can conquer that nation. 




RUDY 
ATWOOD 

Piano 

With 

Ralph Carmichael 

String Quartet 

Come* Thou Fount • Yield jNot To 
Temptation • Je%\)%, I Come * Lite A 
River Glorious • He the Pearly Gates 
^WiH Open •God LeadsrU* Along • 
O Je$us, J Have Promised • 5 others. 
Hi-Fi 1205_$3.98 Stereo 201„„$4.98 
Write for complete illustrated catalog 
At your Christian record deafer or from 

CHRISTIAN FAITH RECORDINGS 
P- O. Drawer T Northridge, Calif. 



"For a Complete 
Christian Education 




JOHN BROWN 
UNIVERSITY 



) 



Siloam Springs, Ark. 

Fully Accredited 

Affiliated with Radio Station 

KGER Long Beach 



Page 3 



TEEN LEADERSHIP by Jack Hamilton. First Vice President 

A new feature of Teen World has just been launched. We 
call it, "Teen Leadership." After two years of careful study and 
application, a program has evolved that will help the modern teen 
to understand his place in today's world and his relationship to 
Christ. 

The first six-week course will begin this month. It is church- 
centered, working through the youth departments. Interest from 
churches has been excellent. With the motivation, "Christian 
Maturity," the course delves into teenagers understanding them- 
selves and relating spiritual truths to all areas of their lives. 

Today's world calls for strong Christian leaders. Teen World is devoted to 
meeting the challenge of this call. 

But thanks be to God f which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. 

I Corinthians 15:57 




\ 



RADIO PROGRAM 
"CUP OF COLD WATER" 

KGER — "90 k.c. 
6:00 a.m., Monday through Friday 

ii : 45*a,m„ Monday through Saturday 
5:30 p.m., Sunday 

KBBI F.M. — 107.5 mg. 
6:15 p.m., Monday through Saturday 

C. Walberg, Pastor 

FR 2-9523 FR 2-7012 

Redondo Beach Congregational Church 

Emerald and Broadway Streets 



NOW 

Is the Time to Plan for college 

entrance for Second Semester 

Write or Call for an appointment 

for Financial or Academical 

Advisement 

LOS ANGELES PACIFIC COLLEGE 

625 Coleman Avenue 

Los Angeles 42. California 

Phone CL 6-2246 

Pago 4 



General Life Insurance Agent 
(Salesmen Wanted) 

HOWARD M* JACOBS 

REALTOR 

16806 So. Western Avenue 
Gardena, California 

Phone DAvis 3-2306 




ONE IMPORT... 

is worth a thousand 

PLEASURES! 



• Triumph TR3 & TR4 • MGA • Renault 

• Caravelle • Peugeot * Sunbeam Alphine 

• Austin Healey • Healey Sprite • Hillman 
•Morris 1000 •Morris 850 • Austin Healey 

• Volvo PI 800 • Jaguar XKE • Damiler 




245 W. Foothill Blvd., Monrovia EL 8-2559 



UNITED STATES SENATOR FRANK CARLSON SPEAKS 




U.S. Senator Frank Carlson 

Chairman of tfio'BoorcT 

of Governors 



We are pleased to introduce to the; many friends of 
Teen World the Honorable Frank Carlson, Senator from 
Kansas, who has served as Chairman of the Board of 
Governors of Teen World since its inception. 

The distinguished Senator Carlson recently said: 
"Teen World's fighting spirit is dedicated to the cause of 
the American way of life under God and our constitutional 
system of government, I personally know and support 
the work of my friend, Roy McKeown, and am pleased 
to be Chairman of the Board of Governors of Teen World 
whose headquarters are located in Hollywood, California." 



J. EDGAR HOOVER SAYS: If we could 
reach one generation of young people 
between the ages of 12-16 for the 
church, we could defeats juvenile de- 
linquency in that' generation. 






FRED BOCK 

ORGAN IST\ 

Greater LA, Youth for Christ 

NOW ACCEPJiNG^STUDENTS 

.Beginners* and Advanced in Organ and Piano 

Accompanying and Arranging 

Call HO 7-8738 



IT IS IMPORTANT, MOST IMPORTANT 

— TODAY — 

What one does with his money, even 
the Scriptures tell us that saving money 
is not enough. Saved money should be 
put to work and should be wisely and 
intellegently invested. 

For Free Information Call 
CHARLES E. MARLAND 

Managed Investment Programs 
Investment Securities — Mutual Funds 

ST 1-3620 — TR 3-5943 
14401 Sylvan, Van Nuys 



CHARLES E. CARPENTER 
Building Corporotion 

Own your own Apartments 

1123 N. Brand Ave., Glendale, Calif. 

Phone CI 3-3126 



HARRY L. BAILEY CO. 

Plumbing and Heating 

418 N. Hoover St* Los' Angeles 

655 Burchett Ave., Glendale 

In our 38th Year 

NO 2-2104 DU 7-2195 ' CI 2-5969 



Closed Sundays 



EX 3-0225 



E D'S 
CARS AND TRUCKS 



Ed Heinmiller, Owner 

3030 Santa Monica Boulevard 

Santa Monica 



ALLEN GWYNN CHEVROLET 

Los Feliz and Brand Blvd. 
Glendale 

Chevrolet — Corvair 

and~the~AILNew~Chevy-IU - 

Phone CH 5-6821, CI 4-8411 
QUALITY USED CARS 
Atl. Mr. Gwynn Bacon 



Page 5 




AROUND THE TEEN WORLD 

by Ken Phillips, Executive Vice President 

We trust that this column each month will be informative 
and a means to challenge you with the activities of Teen World 
on behalf of teens everywhere. 

Every 17 minutes a teenager drops out of school in the U.S. 

Only 68 per cent of those who enter first grade graduate 
from high school. 

—Teenage girls in 1961 spent:^$20^millionon Iipstick;^$837 
million on back-to-school clothes; $9 million on home permanents. 

Teenagers in 1961 spent: $7) million "pop" records; $1% billion entertainment. 

Teenagers drank 3% billion quarts of milk last year. They own 10 million record 
players, and \ x k million of them own automobiles. 

On the subject of marriage: One-third of all girls 18-19 years of age are married. 
There are 600,000 teenage marriages a year. 

Some of the above statistics help answer the question: "Why Teen World?" By 
1970, one out of every two people in the world will be 15 years of age or younger. 

Each month we will endeavor to inform you of the whereabouts of some of the 
men of Teen x w'orId. Every day of the week there is a staff member of Teen World 
speaking somewhere. 

Bill Carle, Basso and Ambassador-at-Large for Teen World, has the following schedule: 

Oct. 6-7 — Sacramento and Turlock, California 
Oct. 13 — Santa Barbara Youth for Christ 
Oct. 14 a.m. — Pasaden3, California Free Methodist Church 
Oct. 14 p.m. — Santa Monica, California Nazarene Church 
Oct. 19 — San Bernardino, California C.B^M.C. 
Oct. 20-21 — Indianapolis, Indiana Youth for Christ 
Oct. 22-28 — First Church of the Nazarene, Nashville, Tennessee 
Oct. 29 - Nov. 4 — St. Louis, Missouri Youth for Christ 
John Webb, Basso and Field Representative, has the following schedule: 
Oct. 6-7 — Sacramento and Turlock, California 
Oct. 8-14 — Panorama City, California First Baptist Church 
Oct. 15-21 — San Jose, California First Baptist Church 
Oct. 24 - Nov. 7 — Audio Bible Society, East Coast United States 

Dr. Herb Tyler, Overseas Vice President, has the following schedule: 

Oct. 7-14 — Oakland, California Youth for Christ 

Oct. 20-21 — Barstow, California Youth for Christ 

Nov. 2* — Redding, California Youth for Christ 

Nov. 4 — Hinson Memorial Baptist Church, Portland, Oregon 

Nov. 5-11 — Battleground, Washington 

Nov. 12-18 — Calvary Baptist Church, Toppenish, Washington 
Each of these men and others are available for your church. Contact us for further 
details. Pray for them in their various meetings. 



TEEN WORLD BROADCASTER — OCTOBER 1962 

Monthly Publication of Toon World International 

Dr. Roy McKeown— Editor in Chief Ken Phillips— Managing Editor 

Sheldon Clements — Advertising Manager 
Feature Editors— Jack Hamilton, Fred Sanborn, Paul Arthur, Watson Spoelstra, Herb Tyler 
Contributing Editors— Gene Sweeney, Bill Stewart, Ken Hopper* Sonny Salsbury, 
George McLaird 
Offices: 1415 Cahuenga Boulevard, Hollywood 28, California. HO 6-7181 



Pago 6 



i 




TEEN WORLD OVERSEAS 



One of the basic purposes of Teen World is to assist 
existing agencies in various countries of the world in their 
work with teenagers. In charge of investigating the needs 
and reporting on all agencies in foreign lands is Dr. Herb 
Tyler, Overseas Vice President of Teen World. 

In its first year, Teen World sent monies in excess of 
$4,200 to the following countries that have existing agencies 
working with teenagers: Germany, France, India, Brazil, 
Guatemala, Philippines, Australia, Peru and Finland. Each 
month Dr. Tyler will be reporting in the "Broadcaster" on 
teenage activity in various countries of the world. 




Dr. Herb Tyler 



3 



1 



>;' 



TEEN WORLD SINGERS TOUR 

"Inspiration for Century 21*' was the theme successfully 
carried out by the Teen World Singers and Orchestra on their 
recent 15-day tour to the Seattle World's Fair and the 
Pacific Northwest. Traveling by chartered ^bus, and using 
a van for equipment, the group of 36 sang t and played 21 
concerts and were received by many overflow' crowds. The 
two outdoor concerts ar the World's Fair were enthusiasti- 
cally acclaimed by the press, television and fair officials. 

One *of the highlights of the tour was the appearance at San Quentin Penitentiary, 
Before the largest crowd ever in the new chapel, Roy McKeown and the Teen World 
Singers gave a challenging program of inspiration through the spoken word and music. 




Fred Sanborn 






4 



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Anderson Fence Co. 



WIRE FE NCING 
COMMERCIAL 
RCSIOCNTiAL 
INOUSTRIAL 




OAVJO A ANDERSON 



**fc«> <«Cn$haw «HVO 
UOS ANGELES 43 



designed 
for baby 

with mother in mind 




PRODUCTS 




Quae <tf 



1NGLEWOOD JERSEY FARMS 
Spring 2-3267 and 371-5544 
SHERMAN THOMAS, Owner 



Compliments 
of 

GUY MARTIN 
OLDSMOBILE 

18425 Vanowen Street 
Reseda ,DI 4-7111 

Specializing in Clean 
Used Cars , 



Pago 7 



TEENAGE DECENCY — {continued from page 1) 

So many times teenagers and adults state that there 
is no use, or they don't know what they can do about it. 
There is something YOU can do! We are suggesting eight 
types of indecency you may wish to take action on — and 
where to write: 

1. Objectionable TV and Radio program: Federal Communication* 
Commission, Washington 25, D.C, and National Association of Broad* 
casters, 1771 N Street N.W., Washington, D,C Also the stations 

—-responsible -and the -sponsor*- of -the- shows.- _ — _ 

2, Objectionable commercials: The same a* above but also: The 
ANA*AAAA Committee £or Improvement of Advertising Content, 
420 Lexington Avenue/ New York 17, New York, 




—l 



Dr. Roy McKeown 



3. Indecent movies: Mr. Geoffrey Shurfock* 
Motion Picture Association of America 
8480 Beverly Blvd., Hollywood 48, Calif. 
Also the company who - produced It, and the 
theater* showing it. 

4. Indecent movie adss Movie company, theater. 
newspaper and Mr. Gordon White, 

Motion Picture Association of America 
28 West 44 Street, He* York City, N.Y. 

5. Newsstands featuring indecent publications: 
Objections may be properly voiced to pro* 
prietor, police chief and mayor. 



6\ General public indecency: Bombard senators 
and congressmen and state legislator* with sup* 
port for legislation to clean up filth. 

7. Indecent record covers and greeting cards: 
Protests may be sent to addresses printed on 
back of record covers and cards. 

8, Indecent newspaper and magazine ads: 

It is suggested that objectionable ads be cut out 
and returned to newspaper or magazine with 
statement that you do not wish such ads In your 
home. —St, Joseph Magazine 



i 



Teen World depends on the gifts of people such as you. Would you not consider a 
regular monthly gift Today to Teen World. Even a gift of $2.00 a month is needed. 
Use the coupon below for your convenience. 



Name 



Address - City. 

Please send me "Teen World" each month 

I would like to pledge each month $ 

I will pray for Teen World 

Send to: Teen World, 1415 Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 



Page 8 



i 





GREATER LOS ANGELES YOUTH FOR CHRIST 

SATURDAY NIGHT RALLY SCHEDULE 

7:00 p.m. Every Saturday Night 7:00 p.m. 

Sat., Oct. 6, 7:00 p.m. -BILTMORE THEATRE, on 5th between Grand & Olive 

GIANT BACK-TO-SCHOOL RALLY — Teens in production 

LOUIS ZAMPERINI — Olympic Track Star — Spent 47 days on a raft 

JOHN GUSTAFSON — Tenor Soloist and Recording Artist 

NEW TEEN CHOIR — The new look in teenagers, with Gene Sweeney 

TEEN WORLD SINGERS — Fred and Jan Sanborn — Fred Bock 

Surprises — Slits — Music — Testimonies — For teenagers and adults 

Sat., Oct. 1 3, 7:00 p.m. -BILTMORE THEATRE, on 5th between Grand & Olive 

WILLA MAE DORSEY — One off America's Great Negro Singers 

An Unusual Voice — A Thrilling Testimony 

CHUNG HO LEE — Hear amazing story of Korean juvenile delinquent 
WES STALLINGS — One of America's greatest ventriloquists 

JERRY HOPKINS — Special guest from John Brown University 
SALUTE TO WESTERN AREA YFC CLUB TALENT 
TEEN WORLD SINGERS — MUSIC IN STEREO 

Sat., Oct. 20, 7:00 p.m.-BILTMORE THEATRE, on 5th between Grand & Olive 

DR. LOUIS TALBOT — Chancellor of the Bible Institute of Los Angeles 

Hear his amazing presentation, "If I Were a Teenager Again" 
GARY WILBURN — See magic at its best — Rabbits — Straight Jackets — Surprises 
DENNIS PLIES — Marimbist Supreme 

GUNNAR KARLSON — Head of Sweden's largest Servicemen's Center 
TEEN WORLD SINGERS — MUSIC THE YFC WAY 

Sat., Oct. 27, 7:00 p.m.-ANGELUS TEMPLE AUD., 1 100 Glendale Blvd., LA 

ANNUAL CHURCH NIGHT 

Prizes to the pastor of the church with the greatest total attendance; also to the pastor of 
church with greaest percentage of church membership in attendance. Prizes include: « suit, 
sportcoat, books and surprises. 

Every church in delegation wins something. 

ALBIE PEARSON — Special guest, Star of the Los Angeles Angels 

The littlest man in baseball 

HELSINKI COMMUNIST YOUTH FESTIVAL 

Fifteen minute film. See and hear Interviews of Russian, French and American Youth delegates. 
Hear chanting of 35,000 Communists and Sympathizers. 
See delegates in parade from 142 different nations. 
TEEN WORLD SINGERS — MUSIC AT ITS BEST — BRASS 

Sat., Nov. 3, 7:00 p.m.-ANGELUS TEMPLE AUD., 1100 Glendale Blvd., LA 

GIANT AREA NIGHT 

Signs — Banners — Surprises — Every high school a delegation 

"BEYOND THE SKIES" — Filmed at the Seattle World's Fair 
A never-to-be-forgotten dramatic story 

QUIZ TIME WITH BILL STEWART — THE NEW LOOK 

TEEN WORLD SINGERS — TEEN TALENT — MUSIC IN STEREO 



YFC OFFICE: 1415 CAHUENGA BLVD., HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIF., HOLLYWOOD 6-7181 

DR. ROY'McKEOWN, Executive Director 



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Mr. | 

1354,ElwPQ!^r 
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Pear Mr. 



Your letter of February 25th hasJbeen received, 
and it is a pleasure to learn of your regard for ^Masters of 
Deceit. " Thank "you also for your jdnd comment = s ~^~" 



be 

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Pursuant to your request, I am enclosing 
some^ material Lhope you find of interest. 

You may also want to consider "A Study of 
Communism" "which I have written and which traces the origin 
and development of communism throughout the world. A copy 
should be available in your local library. 






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Sincerely 'yours j 

iL Edgar Hoover 



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Contcd ...„, 
veLoacp «. 
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T*le 
Holmes 1 
Candy 



Enclosures (5) 

Deadly Duel . - ' 

Wh^ Eeds Make Friends with Businessmen. 
Communist Illusion and Democratic Reality 
Cerent Communist Threat 
E^pse of Soviet JEspionage 



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1354 Elwood 
Pomona, Calif 
Feb 25; 1963 



J. Edgar Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
United States Department of Justice 
Washington 2.5, p. C... 

Dear Sir:, 

I.haye just read your book, Masters of- Deceit 
which I obtained through our company library, (General 
Dynamics/Pomona). I have read it, enjoyed it and wish to 
learn more about the- communist menace, f have joined an 
anti-communist t study»club »-to 4earn more also". 

Can you please send me addional information 
>on the menace of Communism which I.might study and.pass 
on to friends. 

Let nie say in addition, that many people I have 
niet and spoken to about bur present national situation express 
my- sentiments- when Jsay that- I:appreciate.-yery- much the. . 
dedicated fight the FBI is carrying on against the enemies of 
our republic'. . . 



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Sincerely,, 




13 &4 JEiwooa 
Pomona, Calif. 



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Mr. E ^ 
Mr. Gale-,. 






Mr. Kosen.,.. 

Mr. Sullivan ^ 

Mr. Tavel.^. 
Mr. Trotter- 
Tele. Room-- 
Miss Holmes. 
Miss Gaudy- 











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ornoMAi form no. 10 



date: 3_6-63 



UNITED STATES GOVERf^J^T 

Memorandum 

to :• Mr. DeLoach 
from : D. C. Morrell&$*f 



subject: MR. JAMES N.^MSENLAU 
^JW&EjaOMMANDJSR: 

FJ:USTEI«KURD.TU£OSgLN.UMBER*l-l'20,-INC. 
AMERICANJLEGION, 

LINDENHURST, NEW YORK 








Tolson. «. 
Belmont .- 

Mohr 

Casper - 



/Callahan _ jf 
Conrad <^ 
DeLoach*^ _,, „, ljr 
Evans - -» 

Gale ,,_ _,_ 1__ 



Rosen — 
Sullivan , 
Tavel _ 



Tyotter _ 
Tele. Roora . 
Holmes ^u— 
Gandy _ 



By letter to the Director dated March 2nd Mr. Eisenlau advised 
that he had initiated a plan to provide copies of "Masters of De ceit" for use of 
the senior class of Lindenhurst High School in a course on the study of communism. 
The plan was enthusiastically adopted by the school authorities and Eisenlau' s 
Post provided 350 copies of the book to the senior class. Eisenlau is the 
Americanism officer of his" Post. Enclosed in his letter was newspaper clipping 
regarding the gift of the books to Lindenhurst High School; which quotes a state- 
ment of Eisenlau's which is very laudatory to the Director. 



INFORMATION. IN BUFILES: 

James N. Eisenlau is not identifiable in Bufiles on the basis „ 
existing information. Telephone call to New York Office 3-6-63 disclosed no 
derogatory information or other circumstances precluding gift of autographed 
copy of "Masters of Deceit" being forwarded to him. 

RECOMMENDATION: 



m 



In view of Eisenlau* s outstanding support in initiating ai&i 
implementing the plan to provide copies of "Masters of Deceit" to his local 
high school, that he be sent, under separate cover, an autographed copy of* 
the book, and that the attached letter be sent to him. /^ ^/^a^^l y3-*z.£ $9% 



Enclosure J , 

JETrpjt 
(2) 

a o ttm i'l 1963 








B MAR T, 1963 



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March 6, 1963 



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2904 



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imnols^^"" 



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Your letter of March 1* 1963, has been received ~ 

so 
o 
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X 



and your kind remark concerning my efforts as Director of 
the FBI is appreciated. 



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It is encouraging to know that you found my book, 
of value and I am enclosing some material 



"Masters of Deceit, " 
on the topic of communism Whic hi trust will be of further interest 
to you. You may also wish to read mynew book, "A Study of 
Communism, n which deals with the expansion and development 
of communism throughput the world. It should be available at 
your local public library; , 

..Sincerely yours, 

0. Edgar Hoo»> 



Enclosures (5) 
IJommunist Party, USA 



juiAo g iggoCommunist Illusion and Democratic Reality 



a American! s Challenge 
t ■fflSumnr-Phnll It.Be;L%wiqxu£&Vny? 




The 



Tolson .. 
Belmont „ 
Moht^ 
Casper, « 
Callahan 
Conrad ,» 
P«Loach 
Evans*. 
Galo ^_ 
Rosen #T 

Tayep* 
Troil _ 
Tele.'Boowi" 
Holraes 
Gandty. . 




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NOTE: Bufilg^oxmtam no record' identifiable with correspondent*., 



MAIL ROOM 



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TRUE COPY 



Dear Mr Hoover: 



2904 Eshcol Ave 
Zion, Illinois 
3/1/63. 



Thank you for the work you are doing in 
fighting Communism. I have read your book, "Masters 
of Deceit. " May you continue t6 expose their evil deeds. 



Sincerely, 



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Mr. Tolson__ 
Mr. Belmont. 
Mr. MohrJ"" 
Mr. Casper.__ 
Mr. Callahan 
Mr. Con 
Mr. De! 
Mr. Eva 
Mr. Gal 

Mr. Rosen-„ 

Mr. Sullivan 

Mr. Tavel m 

Mr. Trotter 

Tele, Room 

Miss. Holmes 

Miss Gandy, 


















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<'A3i to MAR Jrtt63 



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FD-36|Rev t 12-13-56) 



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FBI, 
Date: 3/5/63 



Transmit the following in 
AIRTEL 



(type in plain text or code) 



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AIRMAIL 



(Priority or Method of UailiHg) 





— i... 



TO: 

FROM: 

SUBJECT: 




IRECTOR FBI 
C OKLAHOMA CITY (94-263) RUC 
CHANGED U^ 



Mr. Tr .v 1 ~ 
Tele. Koo»._ 

m> j: * -s 



aka 




GU YMON. O KLAHOMA^ " - 

RESEARCH (CORRESPONDENCE AND TOURS) 

BUDED 3/8/63 \ 

V 

Reurairtel 2/27/63. 



Titlp marTrpd changed to reflect complet e name of 
J Title formerly carried as l I 



Oklahoma , [ 
610 E. 1st 



GUYMON, OKLAHOMA RESEARCH (CORRESPONDENCE AND TOURS)." 
Mr. I 1 Guvmon r 



lat 

Street f Guymon. interviewed by sa WIL LIAM E. GRU BER. 

his 



3/4/63, at which time SA GRUBER Repressed to Mr 

interest i n the Director's book t T "Masters of Deceit. " Hr7 

I was advised that the Director was unable to grant him 
permission to photocopy pages from this book due to the many 
requests of this nature that the Director has received.. 

Mr. | was very complimentary to SA GRUBER 

concerning the Director and work of the Bureau. 



<?: 



Bureau 
Oklahoma City 

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March 13, 1963 



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^emjca^ngMBeaK 
torU^burg, Westyirgmia 



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Dear Mr, 



Your letter of J&archjBth, with enclosures, 
has been received* 

* t am glad that: you found my bobkj ^"Masters 
o$ Deceit, " of merit. It was kind, of you to give me your 
views on the subject you mentioned and I appreciate your 
thoughtfulness in writings 



of interest. 



Enclosed is some material I hope you find 

Sincerely yours, 

ff-tdgar Hoover 





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Callahan , 

; Conrad _ 
r DeLoach , 

I Evens ^^ 

, Gal© — < 

Rosen, JL 

, Sullivan « 

liTovel^-. 

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iHolmes , 
IGandy 



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Enclosures (5) 

'Know your FBI 

Deadly Duel 

An American's Challenge, 10-9-62 

Why Reds Make Friends with Businessmen 

Expose of Soviet Espionage 



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NOTE' We have haclprior correspondence with Mr. ( i last 

outgoing 11-7-58. His paragraphs regarding poison are rambling 
and rather obscure. A check of telephone directory failed to disclose 
address of correspondent. 



-2- 




Mr, TkuAn . \ 

Mr. 'B^Wftnf/fi^ j 

Mr. MohfiaJ^l, 
Mr/ HngpoAj o 
Mr. Callahan— 



h.*L 




Mr. Gale 



Mr. Rosen 

Mr. Sullivan. 
Mr. Tavcl 



Mr. Trotter— 

Tele. Room 

Miss Holmes- 
Miss Gandy_ 



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ENVIRONMCNTAt STUDIES 

4>CN Q I N « C R I n a COUNSEL 

HOMC-INOUBTftlAL- COMMUNITY 

OROANOLCPTIC MCA8UREMCNT 
QP TOTAL ACTUAL AIR'OORNC 
TOXICITY (AT LOW LCVGLft) 



CHEMICAL .ENGINEER 
MARTINS8URG, W. VA. 



he 

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g fiarch 1963 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Justice 
Washington, D. 0. 

Dear Mr # Hoover: 



o 



I finished reading your book, "Masters of De ceit. " a short while 
ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. I feeTlhaTyou and 'ffiTTepartment are 
to he congratulated for this fine presentation. What little contact 
and what thoughts I have had about Communism match your views auite 
fully. 

When I read your chapter on LIES IN OHE PARSKT, I was impressed 
by how much the changes in our culture in the last decade or two have 
been in the direction of matching life in the communist movement. It looks 
to me as if they are in to us right far. 



"progress" 




I also enjoyed very much your comments that the theme of ^-^ 
was part of the communist line. I have been protesting as vigorously as 
I know how, the way in which science and technology are being changed for 
the worse, and it being called progress. I also felt that your comments 
about communist fund raising activities might well expain some of the 
absurd and high-pressure charitable activities that go on. 

Kecently a friend of mine in the chemical warfare service explained 
to me that v» could now kill people with a few milligrams of material (thousandths 
of a gram). He said what they were trying to do was get so that they could 
kill them. with micrograms (millionths of a gram). It seems .to me that this, 
would add new and incredibly difficult dimensions to your problems of protecting 
our leaders. A sufficient amount to render one of our real champions ineffective, 
or completly out of action could be sent in a letter. Or the janitor or 
maid could put it on the floor of the room and the fumes coming off could do 
so. One recent death of Hugh C-aitskell in England had overtones that made 
me, as a gas toxicologist, feel quite uncomfortable. I was able to uncover 
and get corrected, one very grave environmental problem in the 3fetional 
Library of Medicine, where they were using lindane vaporizer* and had 
recommended them all otfer the world to libraries- but I have not yet been able 




lV of ™ e pesticide control act, particularly from the long-te^.wakrisbiawi 
£§► standpoint. 2his had had the effect of opening a ^dora'stox of^elTful 
£» things, which anv r-hild nar>. jtfytf a^ the corner drugstore or £afid»store. __. ,, 

■n'&lassgpij^itiiaJksafety in the air could be, *? h 



as 



things, which any child can 

Oheir biggest error has beeh^in* as s^jgjttoaia safety in the air could be 
arrived at from animal feeding experiments*. tPor substances having &\low 
water solubility and «&d a ^signiftcantpipor pressure, this is nW Srue, 
%s so well known from mercmy-.pbispBing. Because of its low water solubility" 
and consequent low alimentary absorptioirfithfe same pound of mercury that most 
people could swallow with little harm, would" caus.e mercury poisoning if spille 
on the floor of the room where they work 

IS 





<0 



o 



Some of the people who recognize the present hazard from the gradual 
increase of toxic "burden from multiple sources, are pressing for the 
re-organization of the Public Health Service to give a comprehensive," 
environmental approach to public health. I think this is of utmost 
importance, and that the staff of such a new department should be of 
hi^iest competence and tight security screening* 

My reasons for taking this stand is that subtle methods of weakening 
a prospective victim are the methods of choice of our present oponents. 
If a man or a nation does not even know how they lost their vitality^ 
they are in a veiy poor position to recover it. She evidence seems 
quite clear (exhibit 1 and 2) that they are already using narcotics and 
alcohol in a kind of do-it-yourself, slow or chronic warfare against some 
countries. I would be surprised if they would stop with two items, when 
so many others are available to exploit. 

I want to thank you again for your effort in writing your fine 
book. It has been of much help and comfort to me in these trying times. 




Sincerely yours, 



i 

a 



End. Anslinger eshibit with note 
Mendes-France letters 
Poach brochure 
Pottenger cases 
Petty cases and references 
Public Health Bsport 

Paraformaldehyde labels, note, and letter 
Civil Defense and Chemical warfare letters and mission 
Exterminator exhibit 



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EXHIBIT NO. jQ 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OFAGRiatJ^fURE 
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE***^* 

SERVICE AN DTIEGULATORY .ANNOUNCEMENTS NOTrar'f 



« I - . - 



> > * 4 o 



INTERPRETATIONS OF THE 

REGULATIONS FOR THE ENFORCEMENT 

OF THE FEDERAL INSECTICIDE, 

FUNGICIDE, AND RODENTICIDE ACT 




Issued August 1948 
ZtelMved with Amendments October 1958 



2 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

INTERPRETATION AS TO APPLICABILITY OF ACT AND REGULATIONS 
TO OPERATIONS OF PEST CONTROL OPERATORS 

. INTERPRETATION NO. 1 

The question has arisen as to whether the requirements of the Fed- 
era, xnsceueiue, runmcme, and liodenticide Act and the regulations 
promu gated thereunder are applicable to the situation in which a com- 
mercial pest control operator, as a part of his service operation, carries 
his own economic poisons from one State to another for application 
by him m his work, the material remaining in his sole and actual pos- 
session until applied. l 

&e^l^^ t0 C ° ntr01 PeStS and *® a Part ° f his sorvice work ^PPlies 

SffiSP™'^ e ?r^ - G are familiar ^ Sterf 

such substances and the risks involve d. It would not a nn^r fW ilk 
-iSS, 1 ?^? °f *.9 Q MmerciaLpj st control operator. outlined above .fall 
S.T? ^ «qnt °r intent oftK e registration anfrlabeling p^S^ T 
lOllh eact or the regulations. ' — ^-^ — - ■ 






There is little or no control over the activities of exterminators. If a 
foreign power or the criminal element wishes to use this avenue for 
waging chemical warfare against our population they are relatively 
free to do so. The pest control monthly service which sprays insecti- 
cide in the home, apartment or public building at regular intervals 
provides, a made-to-order way for gradually weakening a population, or 
for selectively destroying the effectiveness of particular leaders. It 
might seem logical to include the activities of pest control operators 
under the Pesticide Act, but the record of the Department of Agrigulture 
has been so lax in terms of the long-term, air-borne exposure to the 
fumes arising from volatile insecticides applied' inside buildings, that 
probably this would not make the situation much better. It might make 
it worse by adding legal sanction and governmental prestige to danger- 
ous practices. 

In all fairness at should "be noted that exterminators have done an 
excellent job of rodent control, using reasonably safe .methods for 
the most part. However, in insect control they have in general 
followed unsafe recommendations promulgated by the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture since World War II. ^lthou^i the newer, more volatile 
insecticides may be superior for agricultural purposes by leaving 

&&&&& fega^h^u^i^iiiffiidf n gr *"* wel1 

(over) 



Apparently the Department,, of Agriculture 
entomologists and toxicologists are not sufficiently 
sophisticated gas engineers and gas toxicologists to 
recognize even the serious health threat from continuous 
fumigation of living and working quarters, Sheir skill 
at killing insects is not denied, hut their understanding 
of the rules of protection of human health from chemiical 
vapors leaves much to he desired. j 



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DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE 

OFFICE OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

WASHINGTON 25. D. C. 



OCT i 8 19S2 



Dear Mr.[ 



bo 
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This refers to your letter of October 15, 1962, concerning the 
basic responsibilities of the Office of Civil Defense. 

Under the provisions of Executive Order 10952, dated July 20, 
196l, the Secretary of Defense is assigned responsibility for Federal 
programs for the protection of the Nation's civilian population against 
the dangers of nuclear attack. The responsibilities, in general, 
include the development and execution of a fallout shelter program; 
a chemical, biological and radiological warfare defense program; a 
warning and communications system; and a program to assist the State 
and local governments in such postattack community services as health 
and sanitation, maintenance of law and order, fire fighting, debris 
clearance, traffic control and the provision of adequate water 
supplies . 

The Office of Civil Defense is not assigned responsibility for 
the public health aspects associated with the peacetime uses of 
insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, alcohol and narcotics. For 
infonnation concerning assignment of responsibility for controls in 
these areas it is suggested that you correspond with the following: 



6* TU^& tf 
US* 



U. S. Public Health Service 
Washington 25, D. C. 



Food and Drug Administration 
Washington 25, D. C. 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington 25, D. C. 



Jd6 
b7C 



Sincerely, 

G. D. Rich 
Staff Director 

Monitoring and Reporting Systems 
Division 



Mr. 

Chemical Engineer 

Martinsburg, west Virginia 



•A 



United States Army Munitions Command 
CHEMICAL , BIOLOGICAL - RADIOLOGICAL AGENCY 

Army Chemical Center, Maryland 



IN REPLY REFER TO. 



SMUCB-EX 27 September 1962 



Mr, 

Chemical Engineer 

Martinsburg, West Virginia 



he 
hie 



Dear 



Reference is made to your letter of 11 September 1962, relative 
to the jurisdiction of the Chemical Warfare Service. 

The recent reorganization of the Department of the Army has 
resulted* in the establishment of the U. S. Army Chemical-Biological - 
Radiological Agency, which encompasses many of the missions previously 
assigned to the former Chemical Corps, (Shortly after World War II, 
the Chemical Warfare Service becaue the U. S. Army Chemical Corps.) 

The mission of the U. S. Army Chemical-Biological-Radiological 
Agency is attached. You will note that the responsibility for Civil 
Defense and the labeling of chemical containers* is not included in the 
mission statement, , since these functi ons are the responsibilities of 
. other federal agencies, r*fi- t*vjl'0>rtOtf$ MAV A£T ymt& 

1 Incl yEU6E^^CRQl^N7*J; 

CBR Agency Mission Lt/ y CoJtoel, CmlC 

Statement Executive Officer 






■*■■/ 



USA CBR AGENCY 



U. S. ARMY CBR AGENCY 
MISSION 



m o*o K Res P on ? ibIe for chemical, biological, and radiological 
materiel and related tools, test, handling, and ancillary 
equipment including: 7 

a. Research,- design, and development; tests and evalu- 
ations which are an integral part of the design engineering and 
systems demonstration stages of development on proposed equipment 
systems, and supplies under Army development di?ec?ion. eqUlpment > 

b. Product, production, and maintenance engineering, 
plannin °* Procurement ' Production, and industrial mobilization 

d. Cataloging and standardization. 

e. Wholesale inventory management and supply control. 

lo „ l\ Sucn s ? ock control, storage, distribution, surveil- 
lance, and depot maintenance as may be assigned. 

, Bu . a g : J*™ f^Pment training, design of pertinent training 
devices and technical assistance to users. . g 

2. Direct and control assigned installations and activities. 

-TVc Von't ptor&ST &/&1 7*67/1 ow*\ 



I 



Two out of three of my friends exposed to this substance in their homes 

in* Florida for about a year, died from cancer within less than a year 

following their exposure* Die sites of the eaneer in lung, liver and 

kidney were significant for air-horne, toxic materials of this type. 

One was an older woman, hut the other was a young engineer, only 27 years 

old* who had never smoked, and yet died of lung and kidney cancer* 

• 
In my work I have had experiences in which toxic exposure produced a strong 

impulse to suicide. When I read of the New York Central railroad financier, 

Hofcert Young, committing suicide in Horida a few years ago, I wondered if 

he might not have had an encounter with this or some similar material* 



Exhibit No. 



7 



4" 



WARNING 
LABELS 

* 

A Guide for the 

Preparation of Warning Labels 

for Hazardous Chemicals 

MANUAL L-l 

Fourth Revision — 1956 




PRiCE ONE DOLLAR 
Published b/ 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS' ASSOCIATION, INC. 

1625 EYE STREET. NORTHWEST, WASHINGTON 6, 0. C. 



-J 







PARAFORMALDEHYDE 

WARNING! CAUSES IRRITATION OF SKIN, EYES, NOSE 
AND THROAT 

Avoid prolonged or repeated contact. 

Avoid breathing dust or prolonged breathing of vapor. 

Use with adequate ventilation. 

*$* POISON £+ 

First Aid-Antidote 
Call a physician immediately. 
!f swallowed: Give a tablespoonfu! of salt in a glass of warm water 
and repeat until vomit fluid is clear. Give milk, or white of egg 
beaten with water. 

MCA Chemical Safety Data Sheet available 



'ZO Z \LM JL3N 
S13S013 'SWOOK 'SSDVdS 30HV1 

hoj svo-ia nis 3oavi ssn 



SJLD3JNISIQ 



saivoiwnd 



suoao Aisnw on 

Q10N ON 

S3SVDMOOS "SM3>lDOn 
SM3NIVJLNOO ONIHXOnD 
"S3SVOJL!nS 'SU3MVMQ 

3AllN3A3Md 
M301II/U 

tfOINOP 



USE DI-GAS JUNIOR IN Alt 
SMALL CLOSED PLACES 
HOMES, BOATS, CLUBS 

Dresser Drawers, Suitcases. Clothtag 

Containers. Letter Files, Bookcases. 

Photo Equipment or 

Musical Instrument Cases, 

Hat and Shoe Boxes 

Also in 

Golf Bags. Duffle Bags. Foot Lockers. 

Gym Lockers. Auto Trunks. Boat 

Compartments, Sail Hampers. Foul 

Weather Gear Lockers and in 

ALL DAMP PLACES 

PtOTECTS 
CLOTH, LEATHBR, WOOD, JPAPKR 

EFFECTIVE IF USED IN RATIO OF 4 OZ. 
IN 500 CU. FT. CLOSED SPACE 

Active Ingredients: 

Paraformaldehyde 95<£ 

inert & Ferfuire 5% 

Keeps Indefinitely In Sealed 
Cellophane .Envelop* 

To put Into use, remove cellophane, 
but leave label attached to cloth bag. 

CHESTER CHEMICAL CORP. 

2732 . 6TH AVE. SO. 
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA 



The housewife gets a high- 
pressure sales promotion urging 
her to use this dangerous material 
liberally in her home. She Is 
given no warning as to the danger 
from the fumes. The man who 
knows what he is handling is 
given a strong warning of the 

air-borne hazard. 



Dl-GAS 



nwwK« 



PHONE 7-3423 



J 



ff 



"1 
J 



n 



j 



D 



2732 SIXTH AVENUE SOUTH * ST. PETERSBURG 12. FLA. 



^ April 1958 



Martinsburg, w.va. 



Dear 



We have just received o letter written on 
one of your letterheads but without the benefit of a 
signature. 

We surest that you contact the U.S.Dept of Agriculture 
Pesticide Registration Branch, R.O .White, in charge, with any 
claims you may have concerning the labeling of DI-GAS. 

All of our products are registered with them and all 
labels and literature have been approved by them* 



be 

hlC 



very truly yours 




C.C.Irving 
I/a President 

-w H6M , c»MTAkfcT*b t«6r t>m> Ok. AUt.iwu.bA 







if 



Volume 74 Number 5 

MAY 1050 

Published since 1878 



RESIDUAL FUMIGANTS 



Their Potential in Malaria Eradication 



WILLIS MATHISi B.S., RICHARD W. FAY, Ph.D., 
H. F. SCHOOF, Ph.D., and K. D. QUARTERMAN, M.P.H. 



R 



KSIDPAL fumigants oiler a new tech- 
nique of vector control which is 
potentially capable of revolutionizing the 
insect icidal approach to malaria eradication. 
Current malaria eradication programs de- 
pend primarily on interrupt ing the. transmis-. 
sion of I he disease through the use of residual 
insecticides, chietly DDT and dieldrin. AK 
though considerable success has been achieved 
with this method during the past< decade, simi- 
lar accomplishment in some areas is being ham-, 
pored by (a) development of vector popnlat ions 
resistant to these insect icides, (h) variation in 
the efficacy of residues caused by the type of 
snrface to which they are applied, ,(c) destruc- 
tion or removal of the insect icidal deposits by 
replastering, washing, or other modifications 
of (lie treated surfaces, and (4) variation in 
the behavior of the mosquitoes. Consequently, 
a method which would reduce or eliminate the 
influence of any of these factors would hasten 
the achievement of the ultimate goal of global 
malaria eradication. 

The authors are with the Technical Development 
Laboratories of the Communicable Disease Center* 
Public, Health Service, in Savannah. Ga. Mr, 
Mai his is a medical entomologist. Dr. Fay is assistant 
chief, and Dr. Schoof is chic) of the Biology Section. 
Mr. Quarterman is chief of the laboratories. ( Man- 
u-eripi received for publication March 23. I9S9*> 



That certain toxicants, such as lindane, 
DDYR Diazinon; and malathion, possess fumi- 
gant properties is an established, fact. More- 
over, in recent studies' of the effectiveness 
against Auophelex qmulriinacylatvx of mala- 
thion deposits on walls, it was noted that; 75 
to 100 percent of the, mosquitoes remaining in 
(he entrance cages attached to the outside of 
the animal-baited huts were, killed (/). 

The death of these mosquitoes was presumed 
to result from malathion vapor being carried 
to the entrance cages from the interior of the 
huts by air currents. The magnitude of the 
fumigant action of organophosphorous com- 
pounds against mosquitoes was first detected 
accidentally through (he unexpected mortality 
of mosquitoes in use as "check" insects; in labo- 
ratory imt$. Apparently, they were killed by 
fumes from an unopened bag of fly bait con-, 
(aining malathion and DDYI\ To confirm 
(his premise, two cages* of .1. quad rhnucul aim 
were placed' I. f> and :>.r> feet above floor level in 
a* small room (5 by !) by 10 feet) at, sites ap- 
proximately 7 to 10 feet from the same un- 
opened bag of bait located at floor level in an 
adjoining room (10 by M by 10, feed). The 
rooms were unoccupied and closed to (he ex- 
terior, ami (he connecting door remained open. 
All .specimens died within ±i> hours. The fact 
that (lie unopened hag contained a plastic liner 
emphasized f be mobility of the vapor. 



Vol. 74. No. 5, May 1959 



379 



To evaluate (his fumigant action under less 
favorable conditions, (he tests described below 
were conducted in an unoccupied two-room 
house and in (wo small huts. 

House Test 

Kadi room was 13 by 12 by 8 feet. One con- 
tained an exterior door and a window, and (ho 
other, (wo windows. All these and an interior 
door between (he rooms were fully open. Cages 
of both susceptible Aedcs aegypti (400 adulTs) 
and Almca domcxtka (200 adults) were placed 
in live positions in the (wo rooms as follows: 
room I-A, sheltered corner; room Mi, in opcii 
window,; room I-C, above interconnect in-door; 
room 1M), exposed corner; and room 1I-E, 
sheltered corner. 

Four 5-pound bags of fly bait composed of 2.0 
percent malathion and 0.5 percent DDVP were 
placed in room I on the floor, 5 (o 8 feefc from 
cage sites A, B, and C, and 13 and 17 feet* re- 
spectively, from sites D and E. The bait con- 
tainers were double-paper bags lined with 
plastic. One was opened, and the others re- 
mained sealed. All specimens were exposed 
for 1 hour, during which time a gentle breeze 
(estimated 10 m.p.h.) passed through both 
rooms. After 2*t hours, mortality for female 
houseflics was 21 (o 24 percent at cage sites A, 
l\ and C, and 2 and Q percent at sites D and K. 
For female mosquitoes, I he values were 95 (o 
H» percent al sites A, B, and C, and 64 and 52 
percent, at sites D and K. 

Hut Tests 

V AXi .U |„,|, (« l>y 8 by 8 feet,) had 2 windows 
(3 by 3 feet) on opposite- sides, both of which 
lvinaiiunl open during (he entire experiment. 
In hut. I ? a single 5-pound open bag of bait 
containing 2 percent, malathion and 0.5 percent 
DDVP was placed in the center of (he floor; 
in hut II, (hive open 5-pound bags of (he same 
bait were located one each at the apexes of ;» 
triangle (2 ft.) near (he center of (he floor. 
One hundred female A. qwtdrimaenhttitx were 
released, in each hut* at :*> p.m. 1 week after the 
baits were installed, ami at weekly intervals 
during (he next 3 weeks. The morning follow-, 
ing each release, all specimens, both living and 



dead, were collected and held for 24- and 18- 
hour mortality dctorminat ions. KcsuItS showed 
100 percent mortality for each of (he four 
weekly tests in each hu(. The tests were dis- 
continued after (he fourth week. 

During (ho fourth week, caged specimens (25 
females per cage) wen* exposed for the same 
time interval at, floor level, and at 2, 4, and G 
feet above (he floor. In hut I, all specimens at 
floor level and at 2 feet were dead within 48 
hours. At the 4- and 0-foot levels, 44 and 88 
percent* respectively were killed. In hut II, 
mortality was' 100 percent for all .positions. 
However, mortality at floor level in an un- 
treated check hut was also relatively high (24 
percent). 

Subsequent tests were made to determine 
whether malathion or DDVP, or the combina- 
tion of the toxicants, was responsible for the 
residual toxicity. Separate formulations of 2 
percent malathion plus 0.5 percent DDVP, of 
0;5 percent DDVP, and of 2.0 percent mala- 
thion were prepared in a granular inorganic 
material (A). A 5-pound lot of each formula- 
tion was bagged in a paper container, and the 
bag was left open and placed in the center of 
the hut floor. Both "free-flying" and caged 
A. quudrhnacuhttux were introduced into each 
hut at 3 p.m., 3 hours after the bait was in- 
stalled. 

The following morning all mosquitoes, 
whether "free-flying" or 'caged, were dead. 
Willi the combination of malathion and DDVP 
and with DDVP alone, all the specimens were 
knocked down 3.5 hours after exposure began., 
'With malathion alone, only a few specimens 
were down after 4.5 hours of exposure. 

Test*? o» the residual potency of these formu- 
lations were precluded because of the onset of 
cold weather. 

Discussion 

The potential of residual fumiganfs for con- 
trolling house-frequenting adult mosquitoes, 
although obviously successful in producing a 
high mortality for A weeks, has not been ex- 
plored fully in these preliminary <es(s. Further 
studies under laboratory and field conditions are 
now in progress to determine which toxicant or 
combination of toxicants is most effective, the 



380 



Public Health Reports 






V 






fcftW 



V 



duratioil 6f s residual action under various en- 
vironmental Conditions, efficient methods of 
formulation in sixfall, Jjghtweight units, and 



would bo eliminated. Although mosquitoes 
appear more susceptible to f umigant action than 
houscflies, the technique may bo effective also 



^w.*i..<%w.* ..* ~.» ? *<^ir>r\!sill — — — - • 

tho to pological hazaixls^ TTltoT^i^^^y^f^X against other types of house-frequenting insect 
^ttfxicologlcaT hazards to the occupants of \vectors and pests. 



f treated dwellings represents a principal qucs- 
/ tion concerning the practical use of the fumi- 
l gants. This aspect will require extensive study 
\ before the technique can be put into general 
\practi£e- ■— .. «— — -~ 

If tho use of residual fumigants proves 
feasible, it is readily foreseeable that this 
technique could result in important monetary 
savings by simplifying malaria eradication 
operations. .Manpower requirements would be 
reduced drastically; the need for spraying 
equipment, with its attendant burdens of main- 
tenance, as well as problems currently en- 
countered with wcttable-powder formulations, 
would be minimized ; and other difficulties asso- 
ciated with residual spraying, such as the 
sorption of residues »by. certain mud surfaces, 
objections to tho unsightliness of residues on 
some walls, and the modifications of treated sur- 
faces by replastering, washing, and the like, 



Because of tho many potential advantages 
which tho residual fumigant technique may 
offer in malaria eradication and in tho control 
of other mosquito-borne diseases, it is hoped 
that the encouraging results of these prelimi- 
nary tests will stimulate other workers to 
investigate tho many questions which must, be 
answered before tho technique may be adopted 
for general use. 

REFERENCE 

(1) Matins, W v and Si-hoof, II. " : Organophosphorus 
compounds as residual treatments for adult 
mosquito control. Am. J. Trop. Med. 8:1-4, 
January 1950. 



EQUIPMENT REFERENCE 

(A) Perlite, Tennessee Products and Chemicals Corp., 
Nashville, <Tenn. 



,1 



z>/VhX6wfffto<js R^Coaam3*Nl b&ert&N>$> @£fM6- MAQS 
Yes, You Can Control ROACHES and WATER BUGS 

. . . but they have a "built-in" resistance to some 
poisons. This may be why you find them hard 
to control. Thorough treatment is very im- 
portant ... A dab of poison here and a squirt, 
there is not enough! 



"How Do We Get Roaches and JX^ater Bugs?" You Ask 



They come in grocery bags and boxes 



They come in from 




the outside -, \jMt They are there when you move in 



They'll be back 





so watch out 



Poisons To Buy 



New Approved Poisons 

for "Resistant" Roaches ^^ Mi > »»U#?fe 

.5% Diazmon ivAAL^twiu^ 



Other Poisons 
You Can Use 



2% MalathionV££ /^^.ggS ^^ 

Read Cautions on Containers 



2% Chlordane ^«L^ 



.to 6 

"b7C 



.5% Dieldrin 






How To Apply 

West Virginia Agricultural Extension Service experts say the steps 
to contror roaches and water bugs are: 

# 4. Brush or spray poison inside cabi- 
nets. Be sure to get poison into 
cracks, corners, crevices, the bottom 
sides of drawers and top and bot- 
tom of base boards 



c 1. Remove all foods, dishes, pots; pans 
and other stuff from your kitchen 
cabinets 

• 2. Clean shelves in cabinets, bedroom 
closets and bathrooms 



• 3. Wash all these places with soap and 
water 




BERKELEY COUNTY 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

MARTINSBURG. WEST VIRGINIA 

Don't Stop Now . . . 

Do All These Things, Too 



Don't wipe poison off. 
It will continue to kill 
for 2 to 3 weeks 






Poison again in about 
4 weeks 



Tell your neighbor 
what to use ! 





If you live in an 
apartment, encourage 
everybody .else to do 
the same thing 



David O. Quion 

Extension Plant Pathologist 

And Entomologist 



Cooperative Extension Work In Agriculture and 
Home Economics, College of Agriculture, Forestry, 
and Home Economics, West Virginia University, and 
the United States Department of Agriculture, Co- 
operating. J. O. Knapp, Director, Morgantown, W. 
Va. Published in Furtherance of Acts of Congress 
of May 8 and June 30, 1914. 



m WMBiWf) 




] ^o*tt (m& new - 



A^" • X S«*« 



V 



sife tow ww*'' 

/ OR BO&t 






^,. w . s.^j^v 



',«-„ 



EXHIBIT NO. 



4 



M. D. 



P. O. BOX 368 

609 NORTH CANYON BOULEVARD 

MONROVIA, CALIFORNIA 



June 22, 1960 



(Transcribed 7-5-60) 



he 
hie 



Mr. 



Chemical Engineer 
Martinsburg, W. Virginia 



Dear Mr, 



I have been very much interested in the problem of insecticides, 
particularly the use of chlordane in buildings, and have treated several 
patients Who have had serious complications resulting from such poisoning. 
In fact, the highest titer that I have found in bodily fat came from a woman 
exposed to chlordane following termite proofing of her house. She had about 700 
p. p.m. chlordane following acute exposure. Her chief symptomatology was 
headache, vertigo, nausea, followed by a pneumonitis and a prolonged period 
of extreme exhaustion and mild disturbace in equilibrium lasting for a period 
of 3 - 4 years. She has gradually recovered. 

I have not published these reports as I should. Other cases that 
I have dealt with included a woman who ran an antique shop who continuously 
sprayed her premises with all of the recommended pesticides including DDT, 
chlordane, and others. She had a very strange type of asthma but da not re- 
spond to any of the normal treatment. Atropine was the mainstay in her treatment. 
She decided to pass on her good fortune to others and got out of the antique 
business. Her recovery, likewise, was slow, but not as slow as the previous 
patient nor was her titer as high. 

A woman working in a florist shop had been exposed to all kinds of cut 
flowers which, as you know, are sprayed with many pesticides including the organic 
phosphates as well. She had not only a peculiar pulmonary" problem but was extremely 
nervous and exhausted. She has not had time to recover. Nearly all of the 
patients I have treated and proved by fat biopsy have been more nervous and • 
irritable (unreasonable) than the average individual. Most have been diagnosed 
as malingerers, psychopaths, neurotics, and considered to be mentally ill. 

be 

b7C 

(The remainder of this letter deals with another matter and I do not have Dr. 

[ permission for its release - These case histories have now been published 
xn "Proceedings - The National Conference on Water Pollution," December 12-14 I960 
Washington, D. C, Pages 243 and 244 - The assistance of the U. S. Public Health ' 
Service in having these case histories published is gratefully acknowledged) 



f 



V 



EXHIBIT NO. 



^ 



"H 



CASE HISTORIES FROM WORK CARRIED ON AT THE LOUISIANA 
STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 1955 TO 1958 UNDER 
U.S. ARMY CHEMICAL CORPS CONTRACT NO. DA18-1 08-CML- 5473 
EXTRACT FROM APPENDIX 5 OF THE REPORT 



CASE 56-12 36 w/m 

NINETY-NINE PER CENT PURE MALATHION WAS STORED. IN AN AMPOULE IN THE 
LABORATORY OFFICE WHERE THE SUBJECT SPENT 6-10 HOURS EVERY DAY. ALSO* 
PRESENT *N PAPER SACKS, WERE SAMPLES OF l PER CENT MALATHION CON- 
TAINING FLY-FLAKES. APPROXIMATELY TWO MONTHS PASSED WITHOUT INSPECTION 
THE AMPOULE OR SACKS OF FLY-FLAKES. DURING THE SECOND MONTH, THE 
TtflS ' 5 ..SUBJECT FELT TIRED, WEAK, AND HAD A GENERAL SENSE OF DEPRESSION. GOOD 
/Zj^oR HUMOR WAS LOST, SLEEP WAS FITFUL. AFTER SEVERAL WEEKS OF THESE 
' -,f pS SYMPTOMS, IT WAS DISCOVERED THAT THE AMPOULE OF 99 PER CENT MALATHION 
■S-VvAS LEAKING AND NEARLY 10 CC HAD BEEN' LOST. ALSO, THE SUN HAD SHIFTED 



OF 



r& 



^tf()H'fi f ' tg S O^THAT THE M ALATHION CON TAJN I NG. FLY-FLAKES WERE NOW EXPOSED TO THE HOT 
E 



'"Ylr.pH'P'^S O THAT THE. M ALATHION CONTAJN 

pl ^i^P^nWmou^m. A^ciJwrRortSia 

P« l5W ' K|t>T EXPOSURE, SAMPLE 1). SAMPLE 
DO^V.aJsFPGSURE AND SYMPTOMS (5-14-56) 



iN^I 



■&P- 



lOLl NESTEP^rE~TTv"EC ) WAS AVAILABLE(TAKEN BEFORE 
2 WAS TAKEN AFJER SEVERAL. WEEKS OF EX- 
OSURE AND SYMPTOMS (5-14-56). SAMPLES 3 AND 4 WERE TAKEN 5-21-56 
ML« 9-17-56, ONE WEEK AND FOUR MONTHS AFTER EXPOSURE WAS TERMINATED. 
EltS CASE IS SIMILAR TO THAT Of THE CHEMl*ST( CASE 56-10) 

WORKED IN SAME OFHCE,.HAD SIMILAR SYMPTOMS. 



WHOLE BLOOD CHE 2.6, 2.5, 2.87 (SAMPLE 1, U, 1B) 



WHOLE BLOOD CHE 2.08 
WHOLE BLOOD CHE 2.06 
WHOLE BLOOD CHE 2.5 



(SAMPLE 2) 
(SAMPLE 3) 
(SAMPLE 4) 



CASE 56-10 



29 W/F 



SEE REPORT OF (CASE 56-12). THE CASE IS SIMILAR IN ALL 

DETAUS EXCEPT SYMPTOMATOLOGY. THJS SUBJECT DID HAVE WIDE SWINGS IN 
PERSONALITY, NASAL DISCHARGE, SHORTNESS OF BREATH, IN -ADD} HON TO 
SIMILAR SYMPTOMS TO CASE 56-12). CONTROL BLOOD (SAMPLE M 10-18-55. 
AFTER EXPOSURE SUSPECTED, SAMPLE 2, 5-14-56. FOLLOW-UP SAMPLE 3, 
8-3-56, AND SAMPLE 4, 10-17-56 



WHOLE BLOOD CHE 2.40 

WHOLE BLOOD CHE 1 .78 

WHOLE BLOOD CHE 2.58 

RBC CHE. 2.53 

WHOLE BLOOD CHE 2.48 



(SAMPLE .1) 

(SAMPLE 2) 

(SAMPLE 3) 
(SAMPLE 3) 

(SAMPLE 4) 



A PROGRESS REPORT CONTAINING THESE CASE HISTORIES IS AVAILABLE FROM 
THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, PHOTODUPLI CAT ION SERVICE, UNDER THEIR 
^v^fX NUMBER PB -130729 - PRICE#6.30 PHOTOPRINT, $ 3.00 MICROFILM 



^^h&i^^Z^^ok 0$e in the- HDfAS BY rue MXtivpA&Tvfrgfi, fi$Jb RY, CovtRhltyZpT A^rA/ft/f-S CfiJilJ'Wr 



t(«RAfrrn l jy l «,^\HOW HELPFUL tT WOULD BE IF THESE STUDIES COULD BE CHECKED IN OTHER 

p %'&**% c * In — - - ^ — *"" 






LIST OF D.R. CHARLES S. PETTY ARTICLES DEALING PARTICULARLY WITH 
ORGANOPHOSPHOR08 POISONINGS 

1. JOURNAL OF THE LOU I SANA STATE MEDICAL SOCIETY, VOL. 109, NO. 2 
FEBRUARY 1957 PAGES 53 THRU 59 "POISONING APT TO BE ENCOUNTERED 
IN GENERAL PRACTICE," MUELLING, R. J. JR., HALEY, M. , PETTY, C. S., 
CHETTA, N. J. 

2. J. LOUISIANA M. SOC. 109(5) MAY 1957, PAGES 158 THRU 164, PETTY, C. S. 
"ORGANIC PHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE POISONING; AN AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONAL 

HAZARD." 

3. W. ENGLAND J. M. 256 (23) 6 OUNE 57, PETTY, C.S., DIBENEDETTO, R. L. , 
"GOITER OF THE NEWBORN; REPORT OF AN UNUSUAL CASE." 

^^Ld^Sjl AM. J. MED. 24(3) MAR 58 PAGES 467 THRU 470, PETTY, C. .S. 
|HH^^*- — "ORGANIC PHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE POISONING" 

5. AM J. CLIN. PATH 29(4) APR 1958, PAGES 385 THRU 390, MUELLING, R. J.,JRj 
CHETTA, N. J., PETTY, C. S. , "ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROPHOTOMETRY AND ITS 
APPLICATION IN TOXICOLOGY." 

6. ITEM 5 ALSO APPEARS IN "TECHNICAL BULLETIN OF THE REGISTRY OF MEDICAL ' 

TECHNOLOGISTS, 28(3) iMAR 1958 PAGES 49 THRU 54 

* — - 

7. A.M. A. ARCHIVES OF PATHOLOGY, 66(4) OCT 58 PAGES 458 THRU 463, PETTY, C.SJ 
"HISTOCHEMICAL PROOF OF ORGAN j C PHOSPHATE POISONING." 

8. AM. J. VETERINARY RESEARCH 19 (73) OCT 58 PAGES 836 THRU 839, PETTY, C.S.,| 

LOVELL, M.P., "IOHOLIHESTERASE ACTIVITY "OF BOVINE BLOOD." 

9. J. HISTOCHEM. CYTOCHCM. 6 (5) SEPT 58 PAGES 377 THRU 379, MOORE, E. J., 
PETTY, C. S., "'A NOTE ON CHOLI NESTERASE ACTIVITY IN POST MORTEM TISSUES." 

10. AM. J. Pbb HEALTH 49 (1) JAN 59 PACES 62 THRU 69, PETTY, C. S. HEDMEB.A. 
REINHART, W. H., MOORE, E. J., DUNN, L. E. , "ORGANIC PHOSPHATE 
INSECTICIDE - A SURVEY OF THE CHOL I NESTERASE ACTIVITY IN EXPOSED 
AGRICULTURAL WORKERS IN LA. 



EXHIBIT NO. 2, 



The Martirisburg Journal 



PAGES 



EDITORIAL PAGE 

THURS., MARCH 8, 1962 



W.Va. 



As Others See It 



WINE-SODDEN NATIONS 

Martinsburg Mar. 3 
To the Editor of The Journal: 

The following correspondence 
may be of interest to you or your 
readers in view of the controvert 
sy now raging in this state over 
the "Liquor-by-the-Drink" issue. 
(Signed) 

Frank Silver 

End. 

Copy of letter to Pierre Medes 

France. Translation of the reply 

by his secretary. 

Hon. Pierre Mendes-France. 

Louviers (Eure), 

France. 



Sir: 

For a number of years now I 
have been troubled by what ap- 
pears to be the destruction of the 
science of chronic poisoning in 
this country in both the profes- 
sional and public mind, since 
World War II. The consequences 
have been the unleashing on the 
public of an increasing toxic bur- 
den from many sources. I have 
seen very little evidence that this 
was caused by anything but mis* 
guided commercial exuberance, 
but the effort seems to be so re- r 
lentless and so monolithic that I 
have begun to wonder if there 
might be some foreign direction 
involved. 

I would greatly appreciate it 
if you could comment on the ex- 
actitude of the following para- 
graph taken from "The Cup of 
Fury", by Upton Sinclair Chan- 
nel Press. Inc., Great Neck, N.Y., 

l"T ^ j . i m *in I hi i n i , _ >i i iii rH i M iii «»iiiii 

•*In France, it was the Commu- 
nists who were most vociferous 
in their campaign of hate, ridi- 
cule and contempt when Pierre 
Mendes-France began his historic 
attempt to curb alcoholism in his 
country. Again they acted in the 
knowledge that a wine-sodden 
nation, sick in mind and body, is 
easy prey." 




Respectfully yours, ^ 

i «, ,, _Erancis_5iiveri £ 

Monsieur ^Francis Silver \ ' ^j? 
Chemical Engineer \. * 

Martinsburg. W. Va. 

I have received your letter of 
the 7th of February while Mr. 
Pierre Mendes France was away. 
But I can, to save time, reply at 
present to the question that you 
asked him. 

It is correct that in 1954 and 55 
when Mr. Mendes France was 
t at the head of the government, 
the measures which St took to re- 
duce alcoholism were critizied in 
various parts, and among others, 
as you have mentioned, by the 
Communist Party. The latter de- 
veloped on this point a rather sur- 
prising demagogic propaganda. 

Please believe, dear sir, in my 
best and most devoted sentiments. 
The secretary. 




"In fact widespread drug addiction 
has Wen used as a powerful military 
weapon. Before Japan invaded China 
in the 1930's it flooded the intended 
victims with free or low cost narcotic 
drugs with the intention of reducing 
the willingness or capacity for 
resistance. Today Red China is guilty 
of similar strategy ty pouring narcotics 
into countries the Red Chinese hope to 
weaken.*' 

PIWENTIOK M) CONTROL .OP NARCOTIC 
ADDICTION ~ U. S. Treasury Department 
page 12 



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EXHIBIT 
NO. .£. 



THE MURDERERS 

The Story of the Narcotics Gangs 

by HARRY J. ANSLINGER 
and WILL OURSLER 



Reprinted with the kind permission of the Authors and Publisher 

FARRAR, STRAUS AND CUDAHY 
19 Union Square West, New York 3, N. Y. 

Copyright © 1961 by Harry J. Anslinger and Will Oursler 

IN ,\\Y C^'N FiELte, I P«jt THAT 
Ttr& fr£<JiJLT- ON T^sr SltEHCts 

Op. MftOhl\t PAGE 300 

P Oj $QMI Af{~ fe fi^/Vft/ fir&QOT #£/££, 



THOUSAND 
ADDICTS 



HISTORY OF NARCOTIC ADDICTION 
IN THE UNITED STATES 



300 

200 

160 

160 

140 

120 

(00 

80 

60 

40 

20 




1 OUt Of 400 




p— i ■ 

^i Horrison Act [ 










i 






- persons addicted 
















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! 
























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. 60,000 addicts 
| 1936 
M 1 In 3000 " 
A addicted 


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Act * 




1 In 3,500 T 
addicted | 




















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1900 1905 



1910 



1915 



1920 1925 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 



1955 



I960 



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W 



to 



PAGE 229 



20. Chinese Red Lullaby 



PAGE 226 



China's narcotic record is an ancient one." going back many 
centuries. In the past she was the victim, first of the European 
nations, more recently of imperial Japan, Now Red China has 
become the dope-vending dragon of the East. But to under- 
stand the present, we must explore the past. 

PAGE 228" 

Red China presents a double-pronged problem. As a part of 
the United Nations Narcotic Commissions, we are concerned 
with what this nation, that we do not even recognize, is trying 
to do to her neighbors, particularly japan, with the weapon of 
dope. And I am also concerned with the reports of my opera- 
tives regarding Red China's long range dope-and-dialectic as- 
sault on America and its leaders. 

The standard policy employed in Red China is to suppress 
addiction among the Chinese while encouraging the cultiva- 
tion, manufacture, export, distribution and sale of opium, 
morphine and heroin to other countries and other peoples. 



Our report cited instance after instance— in the most precise 
detail with names, dates, amounts of seizures, arrests, and con- 
fessions, all pointing directly to the Red Chinese smugglers 
and their political agents. "Of a seizure totalling 3,413 grams 
of heroin in japan," our report states, "all information ob- 
tained from extensive investigations show the heroin in Japan 
originated from Communist Ghina.-Some amounts arrive-f rom, 
Horai, China, between Tsingtao and Tientsin. The Com- 
munists use crews of merchant ships, crews and passengers of 
aircraft, as carriers, as well as their own Communist couriers 
and agents to smuggle narcotics. . . ." 

"Large, quantities of heroin," the report continues, "have 
reached the United States from Communist China. Emissaries 
have been sent to the United States to arrange for the details of 
the smuggling transactions. One of the principals in a case in 
which 300 ounces of heroin were smuggled in from Com- 
munist China is now serving a ten-year imprisonment. . . ." 

I continued to present these carefully documented reports 
to the United Nations in session after session. When cornered 
with facts the Russians could not refute— the confessions of 
pushers and smugglers working directly for Chinese Red 
authorities-the Russian delegate with a sweep of his hand 
would dismiss the whole matter with, "How can they defend 
themselves since they are not here?" 



t>2~ tyz 77 



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ts$ry Arthur3/%iplon, Sr. 
|5u^kegoni jaiichigan 
Doairto. Siptbn:. 



March 13, 


1063 










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1 have. read your column in the "Muskegon filkg 
♦News* 1 for ^Earch 5th and I wantto express my thanks for your 

comments. . - . , 

It was, kind of youto;recommen& I'MaSters of 
Deceit" to your readers and I appreciate your Support. You 
may also be interested* in reading my new book^ M A Study of 
Communism, » whfchjtraces the origm and development of 
communism throughout the world. It should be available at 
your local library. x 



n 



»-''*"<"- "'""y-^^ 



mu&m 
WARM 1963 



Enclosed is some material I hope you fcnd 01 
interest. RS& «> , , - *> "^ a ~>~ 



*$' 



*« 18 




Sincerely. yours, 




**,© 






Tolsoa, ^ 
Belmont , 
Mohr ™— 
•Caspet' « 
XiaUatfan.. 
Conrad,, ^ 
DeLoachl 



a — ^~I \ 

a ci>; ;/>i I- ^^ 



An Americanos ^Mlenge, 10-9-62 

Why Reds Make Friends with Businessmen 

Deadly- Duel 

The Qurrent Communist Threat vrc 



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Evans £• 
'CTaley~ 
Ho sen 
ouUivan^tlL, 
TavelV^^ 
txotter ^ 
Tfte. Roo^ 
Holmes-, 
Gandy^ 




Detroit* 
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TELETYPE UNIT 



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Mr. Arthur J. Siplon, Sr. 



NOTE: Arthur J. Siplon, Sr. , is a retired Captain of the Muskegon, 
Michigan Police Department. We have had considerable cordial 
correspondence with him in the past oh official matters, and he met 
the Director on July 7, 1955. Last outgoing to him was a letter 
thankmg him for remarks in his column in the "Muskegon Elks News" 
and was dated, August 31 ? 1960. Address per last outgoing. 



-" 2 - 



Routing Slip 
FD-4 IRev. 1 

To '*■* 








Date 



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-t^uxreowr ^ /> FILE # 

] SAC Title 

]asac 

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] Agent 



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]steno 
] Clerk 




ACTION DESIRED 



Acknowledge 

Assign Reassign 

Bring file 
Call me 
Correct 

Deadline , 

Deadline passed 

Delinquent 

Discontinue 

Expedite 

File 

For information 

Initial & return 

Leads need attention 

Return with explanation 



c 



Open Case 
Prepare lead cards 
Prepare tickler 
Recharge serials 
Return assignment card 
Return file 
Return serials 
Search and return 
See me 
Send Serials r.. 



to 



1 I Submit new charge-out 

] Submit report by 

Type 



CD 

or notation as to action taken* 








See reverse side 




Office 






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FD-350 (4-3-62) 



(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 




AROUND THE CLUB 

AND OTHER PLACES 
BY ARTHUR J. SIPLON 



Valorous Americans 

Under the forceful leadership of 
Vincent H? Grocott, the American- 
ism committee of the Grand Lodge 
is moving f forward with A renewed 
vigor. Although Brother Grocott 
lives in California his influence s-s 
felt in every subordinate; lodge. It ; 
is his aim to create, * as^ National 
Chairman of this important com- 
mittee, a new birth of patriotism, ; 
and awaken a greater appreciation, 
for all the freedoms, and privileges 
we enjoy as Americans. 

Last fall he sent out a full pro- 1 
gram of activities designed to stim- 
ulate a better and fuller under- 
standing of our blessings enjoyed i 
as a free nation. This included six 
events, to cover from November to 
next June, they were, "Know Your 
America Week", "Bill of Rights 
Day", "Freedom of Speech Week", 
"Washington and Lincoln Birthday 
Observances", "Memorial Day", a 
"Flag Day" in June. 

In advancing this program 
quote him in part, "It is very nece 
sary that we who believe in Amer- 
ica and all she represents, should 
* Talk and Live Patriotism on a full 
time basis. We must awaken those 
around us to the dangers from 
within, and without, that are very 
real . ._.., dangers that Jf ignored by 
a lethargic and apathetic citizenry 
could result in the loss of our most 
priceless heritage. OUR FREE- 
DOM. We cannot afford to over- 
look the fact that If We Don't 
Stand For America We Won't Be 
Able to Stand at All." 

His presentation is ended by this 
quote from a great American pa- j 
ttriot, J. Edgar Hoover, "There is 
no place in America for part-time 1 
patriots. If our nation is to live, if 
we are to continue to enjoy the 
fruits of liberty, we can do no less 
than follow the example of the men 
who won that freedom for us, Free- 
dom, while a heritage, must be re-, 
won for each generation." 

If a doubt exists in the mmd of 
anyone of/ the dangers to which 
| Chairman Grocitt alludes they need 
only read the book written by Mf 
i I Hoover, under the title of, "Masted 
' of Deceit." This book is the resu|t 
t of forty years of study, by a ma 
I whose life has been*' dedicated t 
the preservation .and* betterment of 
the Ameri can uuy* 6ffKie. 



i 



Mr- ToJson, 
Mr. tfeimon. 
Mr. Mohr„^ 
Mr. Casper^.. 
Mr, Callahan. 
Mr. Conrad,., 
Mr. DeLoach. 
Mr. Fvans, „„ 
Mr. 0-Ue^l 

I Mr. Rosen ,...._ 

J Mr. Sullivan". 

j Mr. TaveU„.. 

J Mr. Trotter.^ 
Tele. Room,,, 
Miss Holmes, 
Miss* Gandy. 




(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.). 



U Muskegon Elks Heirs 
Muskegon, Michigan 








3 r 







Date: March $, 1963 
Edition: Mo&thly 

Author: Arthur J. Siplon 
Editor: Arthur J» Siplon 


- 


Title: 




Character: 




or 




Classification: 




Submitting Office: DfctrO&t 







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i?$ 






!.«• • i j ""- mosc elective and * iff *, „„ 1 7i * v * "• »u«v gives mean- 

efficient departments in the entire* F P r the nation it was a mo^It s to - th ^ w ojr ds .> thpt truth .is 
expansive governmental bureauac- ° rtUnat ? a PP°»ntment; becaus^ «„ ^^ than fiction • There is » * 
racy. For many years there was no ? a ? ,n ^eral service has *se?-vert ™ n £ erous amount of information , 
central clearing house in this nV a l lon 8> ' °T wi ^~ greater briflfiHf °" fi - ,e onman y ™™V subjects that 
tlon 7 h i, re ,aw enforcement officers^ .i CC0 4SK !feh ment than the leadev can ,n 4 S0me wa ^ have «» eff ^ct on 
could file mf«v«, »«•:«„ ... .""-"ifof the PRi "" wie leader a court case or tria 1 . The skilled 



This remarkable person has ere- f? a11 departments 'regardless of th» in * ^ "" T , ^" 
ated the greatest investigative or- s,ze " In Ma y 1924 Vwnt Lii " 6 of the .wonders of the FBI is 
ganjzation in the world. Inown as Was pointed to ta'ke ovex" tl-« rt th f - Use °l sc entific methods in the , 
the Federal Bureau of' InvesUra!, 81 ' " 810 ' 1 ^ in the federal ™^ '? lv,ng , of . cr ^ me , and the aD P r "ohen- 
"ion of the Department of Just ce.|S ent and his nam I wis J*ffi^2L? °5 ?«»«»»»«•. Here fiction is 
l i- s - one ?* the m °st effective and W^? ver - , gai ? ut >node<l for it trulv gives meai 

efficient departments in the entire* F P r the nation it was a m n ^ s to - th e w ojds, "th?t truth . 
expansive governmental bureau^ fortUnate ?™")»'~'-' *- ost stranger than fiction" Th^ ;<, 

racy. For many years there was no ? an in ** 
central clearing house in this rfa-f lon 8> ' °l 
tion where law enforcement officers^ 000 ^ 1 
could file information on known 5 * the PBI - 
criminals or obtain facts about 
them. The Chiefs of Police Assoc . 
• ation about thr i! - ./""ocj- 

world war took _ 

kind of centrarbu^eau ln^ " "-"" 

■ri 1 "ty- Experience disclosed thft^ »«HyMual from anotC Vaf l S T .i he *&&» that Mr - Hoover has 
it should be a bureau of easy acc^s made .^ eff ? ctive when methods ^1 r ?" dered th s nation places every" 

y access ^classification were developed ^Un^'^V" love - s his countr y- 5n «« i 
Jeer- Mr. Hoover's m H,Z5i. £&.debt. No man is more devoted, or, 
Became the depository for milhW nas s - trive ^ hard , er to uncover our 
of copies .of fingerprtats S'S ' > ''"' ,c ' ~"~ ' ' 



cu naiucx iu uncover om 
enemies, both here and abroad 
Chairman Crocott is launched on a 
)st commendable project in bring 
z the facts to every, Elk. Botl 
porous Americans in everv sense 
F the word. 



f„ ~r V ' J » c 6^»uace reason fV>v ;f 
£na? &ff ^ "leans of pe* 
Quired hS fl ficatl0 , n which « re-1 
oUiTr^K? mihtary and «^| 

»J '*»»«" methods of i$SS 

?„» «™J ce Aca <Jemy has received 
the finest and most thorough course 

Ssaaapaaww 



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Mr. 

10d Ruckle la Canibre 
Brussels l^IEcIo^um 



Bear Mr, 



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Your letter of ^February 8, 1GC3, has been received, 
and I appreciate your interest in writing me. " 

For your information, my boo&, "Masters of Deceit, n 
has been translated into the Spanish, Italian and Chinese languages. 
I am enclosing copies of reviews regarding my book which may be 
of help to you* Yon may also like to know that thaye recently written 
another book entitled *VV Study of Communism** which la a compre- 
henslye study of the development and expansion of communism 
throughout the world. 



MAfLtU 20 | 

MAR H 1963! 



Sincerely yours, 

jLr£ctgai;i-toover 






Mohr , 

Cosper , 



Enclosures (2) 

1 - jParis - Enclosure '* 

ei^Uj Liaison (Route through for review) 

sk 



l* F or & 




bo 
b7C 



NOTE: | is not identifiable in Bufiles. He^jcates that he is 

interes£e# jln obtaining the FBI review\of JtyLastpx i*M Deceit. ft It is not 

rring to;?'~ Hence, a copy^of the reyi< 



Calfahan _„ 
Conrad . ,L 



^ cJJe&Casi'to justfwhat he is referring to/ Hence, a copy ,01 the review 

*j«£^which appealed in the FBI Law Enforcement Bull'ejip.. Maxch, 1958, is 

t^t enclosed, along with a review "by James L^'OflB^WineSsDigest. Commandant 



*nqt.,used in tittle since he does not indicate the agency with which he is connected. 




boomCjI TeLeryPsouttO 








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SUMMARY FROM FRENCH 



Typewritten letter and envelope addressed to Mr, J* E. 
Hoover, Director of the. FBI, Washington, D. C. , ^bears the 
return address of: 



(Commandant ) 
IQ&Jtae de, la" Cambre , 
Bruxelie s * 15 , Belgium * 



be 

b7C 



Bruxelles, February 8, 1963 



As- an officer, Commandant [ 
i psychological warfare, T 



gave a lecture in 
Antwerp on psychological warfare, ine lecxure, interested a 
reserve officer, who is an official of the Judicial Police, 
This official called the writer's attention to Mr. Hoover's 
"Masters of Deceit" and told him that he would, derive profit 
from the review published, by the^ FBI. 



The writer would like to know into what languages 



\0 

rMasters.-of„,Dec.e±tJ!i has- been translated and if he could 
jr e ceive the FBI review provided" it is not confidential, 

' He has not writ't-en in English which be cannot 
write correc.tly enough. 

Looking forward to a favorable reply, 

Very sincerely, 



REC- .64 
a. - H6 (signed) 



2L* 





Y- 




Commandant 







t 



he 

b7C 



03 



J: - 



■iAl 



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SUMMARY FROM FRENCH 



Typewritten letter and envelope addressed to Wj, J* Et- 
Hoover, Director of the FBI, Washington* D. C«, bears the 
return address of: 



(Commandant) 
100 Kue de la. Cambre 
Bruxelles 15 j Belgium 



* ♦ 



Bruxelles:, February 8, 1963 



.Save a lecture in 

•i l ne iccxure interested a 



As, an officer* Commandant 
Antwerp on. psychological warfare • 

reserve officer, who is an official of the- Judicial Police,, 
This official called the writer's attention to Mr. Hoover* s 
blasters of Deceit tt and told him that he would derive, profit 
from the, review, published- by the FBI* 



The writer would like to know .into what languages 
Piasters, of Deceit" has* been translated and if he could, 
receive the FBI review "provided it is not confidential # 

He. has not written M English which he cannot 
write correctly enough* 

Looking forward to a favorable roply^ 

Very sincerely,. 



bo 
b7C 



STTMMAT?T7.ttn KV» 



pLbg 

JIarch 11, 1963 v ' , 



(signed) 



LOJiuiiaiiuaiu 






bo 
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106, Rue de la Cambre, 
BRUXBLLES 15 
BELGIQUB 



k .b6 

b7C 

Bruxelles, 8 fevrier 19^3 > 



Monsieur le 3)irecteur, 



V 



J'ai eu, a titre d 1 off icier, I 1 occasion de donner une 
conference a Anvers sur la, guerre psycho logique . Elle a eu 
1'avantage d'interesser un merabre de la police judiciaire - 
,off icier de reserve - qui ta'a signale l*interet que j'aurais a 
lire votre ouvrage : "Masters of Deceit" et a pouvoir avoir 
connaissance de la revue editee par les soins du P J L 

Je prends la Irberte de vous demander dans quell es 
langues votre ouvrage aurait ete traduit et si vous ne pourriez 
me rendre destinataire de votre revue, pour autant que celle-ci 
n'ait pas de caractere conf identiel . 

Vous voudrez m'excuser de ne pas vous ecrire dans votre 
langue que je comprends relativement bien mais que je n^cris 
pas avec la .correction souhaitee* 

J'ose esperer que vous voudrez Men reserver une suite 
favorable a ma demande et vous prie d'agreer, Monsieur* le 
Directeur mes salutations tres distinguees. 




b6 
b7C 



Monsieur J. Edg. HOOVER, 
Directeur FBI 
WASHINGTON 3). C* 
U. S. A. 



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March 18, 1963 



Afl*3fc.//C/ ^ 



jsuueagevvpnue 
~East Grange," New Jersey j><^. 



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Dear 



Bff ,^.^.^ 



. I have received your letter of March, 7th and want/you to 
know how much I appreciate .your comment about "Masters of EJeceit." 



o 



I was interested in your observations concerning the _ 
communist dialectical method. Of course, the communists use their-p, Y 
false reasoning theories to achieve whatever result they desire but |? 
would never accept the fact that their own doctrines* and system of DD o 



h-i 



reasoning could be used against them* . «— ? o 

In connection with your inquiry about the calendar, the o 
Western world has used the Gregorian Calendar for many years but it 
did not replace the Julian Calendar in Bussia until 1918. You may 
want to check some reference Books concerning these calendars and - 
the differences in them. - 



to 






X) 



Ills a pleasure to send you some literature about the 
FBI as well as material relating to communism/ We certainly hope 
ftR \ 6)9631 that when you come to Washington you will stop at FBI Headquarters 
and visit our facilities. Tours are offered daily between the hpurs of 
.9:15 a*m. and 4:15 p.m., excluding Saturdays, Sundays and, holidays." 
pur tours last approximately one hour and there is no chax*ge.< 

it ,s «;j lu nn Sincerely yours, 



tMitsni 



<JOMM£E« 



ir"» 



><\ 



i 



? SJ t«,e3 



l ^ # 



Tolsori,, 
Belmont;,*. 

Casper^J 
jCallanan - 
Contact .^^ 
DeLoacH •« 

Evans _ 
Gale v — _ 
Rosen ^—» 
Sullivan _. 
Tavel iJl 
Trotter «— . 



Enclosures (5JSj£» ; 



0. Edgar Hoover 



% 




w%jy 



Pf3 



Tale. Room . 
Holmes __ 
Goody _ 



Note and^ Enclosures on Next Page 
JH:kcf|,4$) ^ 

MAIL ROOM (— 3 TELEXY?EUNItEZ1 




t*EC£!AE0-O$!CiO 





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Enclosures (5) 
Knowr Your FBI 
The FBI Laboratory 

^mgerprint Idenlif icatiOn - . 

^at You Can Do; To Fight Communism. V •--'-' 

/ - Young JPeqple CaAHeipDef^a^Communism' -'-_•",,-' 

NOTE": Correspondent, cantiot feidentified.inBufiles. Page 32 of "Masters 
of ■ Deceit" indicates that the. Russian ^Revolution occurred dnNoyember 7> 
1917 but is referred'to.'as the "October Revolution" since Russia followed 
the. Easterh'Calena^r'tdtheHtimfe.of the, Revolution. World Almanac 
indicates that Jlhssia adopted- "the Gregorian Calendar in 19i8 and thatijt 
. replaced the Julian Calendar in, the "Western- world in the }fcth Century^ 
- except? for England' whic,h adopted.it in the 18th Century. In the 1900s* 
there was a 13-tfay difference "between the Gregorian and Julian Calendars.; 



-2 - 



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6 



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235 Rutledge Avenue 
East Orange, N.3. 
March 7, 1963 



»-.-?-*iS*f^«*-Ss **^« 



«t 



Dean Fir. Hoov/ee, 

I am 11 years did. I have been reading your book 
"Plaster s of Deceit" . I am on page 77 and I am completely 
"urappBU-up in lt.'u'ne thing puzzles me so far; the thesis- 
antithesis-synthesis dialectic. ; 

If the Czar is thesis, the proletariat is antithesis 
and the Communists arid Bolsheviks synthesis and Marx 
saiux*kHX*xxxHx2ajcsxxxxxxxxxxx said that the process goes 
on and on hasn't it occured to the Communists that they 
are now the thesis ,we are the antithesis and that (all this 
being in accordance with the Marxist kkn dialectic) the 
best of both classes will form a synthesis? If the Russians 
used a different calendar than the Western one in 1917 
which one did they use?what was the difference? 

I know tnat you must have more important things 
to do than to attend to this letter so I will not take 
any more of your precious time* but I would* appreciate an 
to my question. 

Sirtcereiv. 



Mr. Tolsoiu 
Mr, Belmont 
Mr. MoT*r_ 
Mr. Casper.. 



Mr. Caliban 

Mr. ({cy/Ni. ~s 

Mr, Pfffilh_Z- 




Mr. Evan! 

Mr. Gals,-.. 

Mr. Rosesu™ 
Mr. Sullivan.. 
Mr. Tavel 



Mr. Trotter— 

Tele. Room 

Miss Hohnes. 
Miss Gandy._ 



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P.S. I am coming to Washington this Easter; please send me 
some information about the F.B.I. 



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Mr. 
7581 




March 19, 1963 



Alexander Koad 



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StephenviUe, Texas 



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Dear Mr 



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'Tolson * 

- JBeJmoht , 
"Vo&V^ 



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. Your letter of March 8,, 1963, has been received.* , 
'm& &assBafagmx&BBd mm It is encouraging to hear from citizens who 
are anxious to learn more ahout how we canfight the communist . 
conspiracy. - . "* - *> 

I was pleased to learn you found my book, ''Masters. 
of Deceit," to b # e of interest, and I have no objection to your using 
;it in the manner you outlined. "However; if you plan to reproduce 
or publish a substantial portion of thisbopk, you should obtainthe 
permission of its publi&heif, ffolt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., 
383 MadisofcAvenUe, New York 17, New York. 

In view of your interest, I am enclosing material; • - 
some of which contains suggestions all of us can use in the struggle 
against communism. In addition, you may also want to consider my 
new book, "A.Study of Communism." A copyinay be available through 
your local public library. ._'".* 

*-. Sincerely yours, ." k - : 

& Edgac Hoover 
mi} 

Enclosures (5) Young People Can, Help Defeat^dommunism 
Shall It Be Law or Tyranny? £»5 \$." ^ w< 




Why Iftafcj jtopfi 



With Businessmen \ 



The Current Cfoinr&Sritet Threat* The^pmmumst Party Line 
NOTE: ^o record of ccjrrespondent^m'Bufiles. 





M A£C BPOM C3 TELETYPE UNIT CI 



iv*\ 




/ 



2fHM« 



v§8lf»Alexander 
4-** 1 Sftephenville, 



8, 1963 




Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 
< .1 ector, Federal Bureau Investigation 
Washington, D. C*. 
Dear Mr. Hoovers 



£6&d<>*per 

Mr. Callahan 

li :*-. «;^ 

* T.tr. Taval 



i| Mr. TfOi^r. 
| Tele. Eccm. 



Hiss E >kne3 — 

Miss Gandy 



The writer is trying to arouse interest in our local 
citizens, to the rapidly growing Communist menace. 

After some investigation, it appears, that no j^tte*^ 
material is available than your bookU%AS;r, £RS O g ^gg ffi^ 
Please. .advise if, and how, perraissiUTjFmay oe obtained 
f .*o use "MABfekS (Jptf^EBBf for study, and posslb^ylsome^ 
Xf/nited articles in loc'sTl county papers. ~e^-* C M 



I 



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Thanking.yoJ- i$ advance, for this in for mat ion- and 



thanking 'OUS » GOD' -that,, -we have some meh^of your type,, who 
are making every effort to preserve our AMERICAN WAY OF 
LIFE. p ' ' 



Yours Sincerely, 



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Tolson ... £& 
BelmontiagJ 
Mohr-JBgljl, 



Mr. Tolson 

Mr, 

Mr 

Mr. Casftcr, 

Mr. Callahan y 

Mr. Cccnvad JL 

Mr. DfcchV^. 
Mr. E^jans._ 

Mr, Gale 

Mr. Rosen 

Mr. Sullivan* 

Mr. Tavcl. 

Mr. Trottcr._ 

Tclo. Room«_ 

Miss Holmes. 

Miss Gandy_ 





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63~/*Sl77-& 5 



839 MAR 20 1963 



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March 6, 1963 




Mr. l 

2704 Easfcjort King, Avenue^ 

Ocala, Florida 



Dear Mr 



Thank 
your jdrid remarks regarding 



you for your letter of March 2nd and 
igarding my bookr" Masters of Deceit.! 1 ; 




The thought prompting you to send me the two 
'•.communistic gavels" is very much appreciated. The sym^ 
bolism you related pertaining to the parasitic and* destructive 
nature of communism is inostM¥W¥tfM&// appropriate. 

i believe %^$i$$^)0?0^ m M 
0/M&ffllffl literature dealing with the evil of communism 
and its menace to the democratic way of life we hold so dear. 



MAILED i 

MAR 6 1963} 

comm-f^,-- * 



Sincerely yours,, 
J. Edgar Hooveic 



1 1 - • "W * 




Tolsotv^s™. 

Bolcwnt -^ 

Cosher «* 
CaUohon « 
Conrad ^* 
peLoach ^ 
Evans, .-_ j; 
Safe «««* 
Rosen ->^- 
SuHivah «£. 
Tavol = 



Enclosures (4) 

The Deadly Duel 
t 10-9-62 Speech, "An American's Challenge- 

jr ° If" ^hj^^jlake "Friends with Businessmen 
~r The Communist Party Line 

"5eC<0 l ?$^ E: ^S u ^ es ^ c 011 ^ 11 no references to correspondent. 




b6 
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#s I 



Trotter ^^^ 
Teio. Boom 
Hofotes^ 
Gdni/i 




&VA:gcb (3) , I J 

mailboomCU teletype umtC3 





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^uCPV^EO 'C»UE0a'- 



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Ocala, Florida. 
March 3,1963. 



Mr. J.Edgar Hoover, 

Director Federal Bureau of Investigation, 

Washington, D.O. 



Dear Mr. Hoover; 



V- 



I am sending to you, by parcel post, a 
carton containing two "communistic gavels 11 . The handles of 
these gavels are solid oak representing solid citizens of 
the oak family. The hammer is mistletoe, a parasite, which 
represents communism.* Misltetoe drains the life sap. (or 
blood) from the oak and gradually destroys the tree pust 
as communism gradually kills the freedom of a nation . 

Your book, MASTERS of DECEIT should be compulsory read- 
ing for all school pupils and all service men. 




Mr. Gale 



Mr. Rosen,,,.... 
Mr. Sullivan.. 
Mr. Tavel.,*«. 



Mr, Trotter^.. 

Tele. Room™. 
[\fe tfAtofes...,, 




Respectfu lly. 








8704 E.,Pt. King Svemie 
Ocala, Florida. 



£ 



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MMHM HHMrt ^mhmm 

9 MAR .801963' 



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MAR 4,1'963! - 1 




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Mr- ^olj^lL 



Mr. Caster- 
Mr* Cowai* 

Mr. K rvrt tt£- 
Mr. SV»iv$uj. 
Mr. ?..*Y*l^ 

Mr. f ^ ttefc. 



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March 21, 1903 



Miss 

J74lWest/I07tK Street 
Chicago 557 fliinbls* 



Pear Miss 



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YoUr letter of Maych 13th has been received, and 
I to/ant to thank you for your thoughtful remark about my book* 
"Masters c£TbeceiV f 

Although I would like to be of service, information * 
in the files of the FBI must be maintained as confidential pursuant 
to regulations of the Department of Justice and is available for 
official use only* Please do not infer either thai: We dp or do not 
have information in our files concerning thesubjects of your inquiry* 



or> 



!*fS»" 






lam returning your enclosure as you requested*,, .+. 

Sincerely yours, 

JBj.fi^t Hoover 









U * 



H-*S 

O 

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■cry 



Enfclosure 

Correspondent's, Enclosure * 

ecsiNOTE: Prior limited but cordial correspondence with a person believed 
^to be identical with the correspondent. X.ast bumping was 9-4-52. 

^ The publication, "The Coming Red Dictatorship, "' has cOMe 

vto the attention of the Bureau on numerous prior occasions. "Common Sense" 

^ee next: page »*" ii 1^'^^ *&■* 



*RMW:nlb' 

CO 



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Miss GandyU 



uw^,- 'i Wi 



Mail Room 



Teletype Unit 




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is a notorious. anti-Semitic hate sheet published by the Christian 
Educational Association of Union, New Jersey. This association has in 
the past been; the sutfj ect of a Racial Matter s, investigation for the 
.purpose of, determining whether the organization advocated, condoned, 
or incitejdio violence for 1 the purpose of deriving others their , , 

Constitutional' rights., ■ ' , ,. [ 



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6 







TRUE COPY 



3742 W. 107th St. 
Chicago 55, ni. 
13 March, 1963 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Justice Department 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover, 

r I am a High School World History teacher. Recently, 

• one of my students gave me the paper here enclosed. I had never 
1 actually readanything like this before and was really quite shocked 
by what is printed therein. This is the kind of publication Nazi Germany 
might have released. I am sending it along and wonder if you could 
possibly identify it with a particular group? I would like to have the 
paper if possible as an example or study in yellow journalism— but if 
you want to keep it -r do so. 

There was another paper called "Common Sense" printed 
by the Christian Educational Assoc, of 530 Chestnut St. , Union, New^ersey. 
It was equally vile & vicious concerning the U. N. Is there any information 
available on the groups who mail this awful material? 

Thank you for your kindness. I know you are so terribly busy, 
but it upset me to see this kind of literature in the hands of youngsters. 

O 
Might I add that Masters of Deceit is really a textbook on 
Communism and quite a masterful study. 



Sincerely, 




■X* 



/s/ 



„/oy*il 



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Mr. Tolsjn 
MpxBcI 

m| 

MlF^Mispcr. 

Mr. Callahan ,. 

Mr. Con^pd.,-.^/ 

Mr. Dciwyh .k.. 

Mr. EvSnO_ 
Mr. ^* n ^ 

Mr. Rosen 

I Mr. Sullivan 
Mr. Tavcl. 



Mr. /Trotter. 
Tele* Room- 



MW 



Mise Holmes*. 
Miss 'Gundy— 



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March -2$ 1963 






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^ Tofson «. 
Belmont - 

'. Mohr— _ 

Casket *~ 
jCaUahah-, 
Cohrads 



- DeLoach *i«-LL* 
Evansf , . ........ 

Gate 



Rosen 



Sullivan ^ 

Tavel 

Trotter _ 

Tele,JRgM 

UolmesMj 

Gana/JS 



Rex££end[ 



€6,coa, glorid a 
Dear Mr, 



Your letter oi March 18th ha#beeh received 
and I appreciate your kind sentiments. Thank ypii also for 
your interest; in my book, ^Masters o£ Deceit."^ 

Pursuant to you£request> I am enclosing 
some material I hoge you*f ind of asfeistatfce, Quantities of 
these publications are available within certiiiii budgetary 
imitations. 

You may also fe^tt^ 
new book, "A jStudy of Communism, >' which traces the 
origin and development of communism throughout the 
world. It should be available at your local library^ 












jSincerfely yours, 

If. £dgaf Hoqver -. 





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Reverenc 



Enclosures 

•Bulwarks of .Liberty 

An American's Gnallengej,, lCh9-62 

Why Beds Malse fiends i&m Businessmen 

Deadly Duel 

Communist . ; ElnM6n;;an'd Democratic keaHty 



be 

b7C 




"Communist Tdrgetr^Ybuth. " 



-2 - 




SI~ CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
saw 



*^" , '*-*\jr» 



1403 DDS3N BLVD. 
COCOA, FLORIDA 



9 



THE PORTAL TO OUTER SPACE 



MINISTER 



be 

b7C 



RESIDENCE 1205 MONTCLAIR RD, 



18 March 1963 



Mr* <!• Edgar Hoover 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D. C. 







Mr. foolson. t^jj- 

Mr., 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. Callahan.. 

Mr. Cbpyad,. — „ 
^j$ Mr. DeS&^Wr 

Mr, Evami 
*M Mr. Gale^ 
OsMr.* Rpseru 



Dear Sir: 

Mr. Sullivan 

I was so, happy to hear that you will continue as head £ $*£; ^J^ 
of the Bureau for I appreciate your work and copy .numerous of ^ 
your statements in my church papers. I have been urging people - 
to read^Masters of Deceit 1 ^ which I feel everyone should read. 



Are there any recent publications from your office 
which I could have? I would also like to knew about getting 
quantities of your messages for circulation. Please send 

samples. 

With all good wishes 



*»Mr. Trotter^ 
Tele. Room., 



2Miss Holmes J 

Miss Gandy^ 




1205 Montciair Kd 
Cocoa, Florida 




REC- 57*. 




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re 



ST-120 



M./sfrfir*** 



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<7MAR-£G-1963=> 




im^^jJffi ' 












March 21, 1963;/ ^^ 



Mis j 

Little River Bank andTrust.Cjpmpany 

Corner N6rmeast.2ndJ&cnue and SOttPTerrace 

Miami ^8, Florida 



*-71 

3ar Miss 


F -1 " 8 1 



,-.>* £<'/ 



*f A 





Your letter of March 14th and the enclosed 
copies of your magazine have been received. 

I have no objection to the use of excerpts from 
my book, "Masters of Deceit, » in your editorials and I 
appreciate the splendid support you have afforded in the fight 
against cpmmunismi it was thoughtful of you to give me your 
Views on the potential yalue of industrial publications in this^ 
struggle, and Ialso want to thank you fdr your com^mentar^ 
remark concerning my -writhigs. 



*i« 



o 

.O *" rrv 






" ^ -^ lam enclosing some material Itrust gjoa willT^ ,. - 

find, of interest. You may also wish to. read my book;. 1 "A Study' ' ** 
of Communism, Jt which traces the origin and development of~2 
coujinunism throughout the world. It should be available at sour 
local library: - — ** 

. Sincerely yours, 
tX. EcJgarr Hoover" 



=>•> 

f**^ 



O' 




Ehciosmp $y 

See enclosures and l^OTE next pa 
WtM) 



ifvca' 

[el 

JtteV 

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IL^OOmO *ELBTY££0NItE3_ 









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Miss 



JEhciosures 

Know you> FBI 

M A^erita^. Challenge, l6-9.-;62f 

Why Bteds .Make Friends, with Businessmen 

CbmmmUst Illusion and Democratic' Reality 

Bulwarks of liberty. " '" ./ = 



be 



NQTE:. Bufiles-coritaih. no. record iSentifiable with Missl 
.or MBank ^ptes, '•• £he ©uyeauhas enjoyed cordial rela tions 
with CongressmamFascell whom the correspondent mentioned 



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Little River Bank and Trust Comi JKS-Sai 



CORNER N. C. fiNO-AVCNOC ANO SOTm TCRRACC 

Miami 38, Florida 



i 



1 Mailing list 
| Gkemgo Noted 



Belmont—**. 




Membe 

FEDERAL RESERVE 



March ik 1963 




Mr. Trotter.. 
,*Tde. Roonu. 
Miss H^mes- 
&JfcH§MGandy_ 



/ ^ 




Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 

Director 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington 5, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

Sometime ago ,1 had the ej^ghtening exper- 
ience of reading your informative booR~* Tfesters of Deceit"., 
It made such a lasting impression on me that I decided to 
share ray findings with" others • 

As Editor of our magazine" B ank Notes, I re- 
ceived the wholehearted approval and permission of our Pres- 
ident, James G. Garner, to use the bac*c cover xor Editorials 
slated to waken people out of their lethargy* A ^ . 

I <Q£ 1/ r rtt A* J &t j3j^/ C frtfo T^'SK -V 

Enclosed are copies of our magazine with back ^f~ "" 
cover Editorials re Cfcmmunism,. and exeeppts from your book. 
I trust I have not been presumptious in using you as a source 
of material and information, without first asking your per- 
mission ♦ However, I honestly felt you would noi have any 
objections and shall... if you do hot mind. . .continue to quote 

EX-I17 &l & 2 -st** 7 ?- 29CS 

Although our magazine has a small circulation z&:S 
of about 650, it is distributed to personnel, stockholders, -*s* 
directors and a special 'request 1 list. The consistent re- Jr 
minder of the threat of Communism has I believe, influenced 
folks to the very real danger, and is responsible in part ^for 
the display of interest in your book. After reading it,*- com- 
ments were to the effect that they "didn't realize ho\? im- 
portant it was to know" * ..and that it was "mo st informati ve. .^ 
wonderful!!" '- * ~* 



»*/rt'^2*'/ pL/h 



zsz 
1*0 



There are about 

T * 



10^000 Industri; 



throughout our country that are read £*ith jiauc} 
interest, than the daily newspaper. Editors aa 



jasa 



locations 
ersona 



are/&qac[ua|ly a- 

^.___^. „ __ „_. „„.. _„__,_ : ._ publications are 

li important "weapon" in the fight againsl^Cdmmunism. What 
r5T impact it would be if ALL such publications; were to con- 



interest 
HjG^eningito the fact that their individual, publications are 



GtOSOPS 



£$$& 



anti-Coinmunist articles. These %6u0%be read 



■*^a* 



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Li frtD* River 



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Bank and Trust CXsaipany 

•Is* ' 



- 2 - 



not only by personnel, but would be taken into the homes and 
literally reach hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people • 

I do not mean to imply that our magazine is the 
only one in the area that is doing this sort of thing • It is 
not* There are others with much higher circulation figures 
than ours, that prints such articles . 

In relationship to the rest of the country, I 
do not know how South Florida publications stand in the anti- 
Communist effort. But I do know***that in spite of the know- 
ledge that missiles can be guided at will -- our geographical 
proximity has a psychological effect on the general thinking* 
Editors in this area are aware of this* 



In closing, I would like to add that Congress- 
man Dante B* Fascell, has been a great help inudirecting my- 
self, and others, to proper reading sources and has on oc- 
casion forwarded pertinent literature* He kno^sl appreciate 
his efforts* 

.And it is because I deeply appreciate your book 
that guides me constantly and literally was the impetus for 
these editorials, that I send copies of bur magazine to you* 

When a person writes with obvious knowledge, 
authority, sincerity and dedication — as, you have — and 
stirs people to doing something about — he should know it* 



of interest. 



I trust you will find the editorials to be 
Thank you for taking the time to read this* 



b6 
b7C 



Vaw a^^pIv, 



Editor 
Bank Notes 



ft*-j-**Wi!"\Z ^ _-«. **-** 




[' .■;:,.- 




&b ^% 




Matok f963 







- f A; ^ 






T 



LITTLE RIVER BANK and TRUST* COMPANY 



8017 NORTHEAST 2nd AVENUE 



MIAMI, FLORIDA 



— s- ■■ - — — ' ■■■■■ — ug. -" — ■.. ..■■ H i ■ x.JX~» ,Br fB7i r '--jii iiir J 



BANK... 
N 




Vol. 6 



No. 2 



. . . Dedicated to Progress . , . Through 
Mutual Understanding and Apprecia- 
tion for each other. 



ADVISORY BOARD , 

DANIEL C NORTHROP 
Vice President 

EDWIN M. GRAHAM 
Vice President 

* * * * 

EDITOR 

LYNN D. BROWNE 

• • ♦ * 

STAFF 

Virginia Asbury 
Lorraine Aufford 
Judith Kaufmann 

Mae Teubner 
Dorothy Wallace 



i 



snea 




1 1 C L i E i 




.> * 



Member South Florida Industrial Editors Association 

Southern Council Editors Association 

International Council of Industrial Editors 



Contents 



About the Cover ... 



Feature Story 



Have You Heard ... 



Man Behind the Title 



4-5 



Profit Sharing »_*_„ . 6-7 

The WelcomeMat; ._,. , 8 

Officer Promotions . ™ - 9 

Happy Birthday .«.„„. ■*—*.-* 11 

New Machines in Block w 11 

Personally Speaking ^ Back Cover 

About the Cover. . . 

Smiling Mary Foresteire on our 
cover, is a mother of five, and 
grandmother of seventeen. She 
works because there isn't enough 
to do at home. Read her story on 
page 3. 



Mary Foresteire Delights in 
Check Imprinting "Print Shop" 



In the Spring of 1961, Personal Check- 
ing Account customers were given Per- 
sonalized Checks. Outdoor advertising 
boards, staffers, radio commercials, and 
newspaper ads, told our customers of 
this new service designed for their con- 
venience. 

Because of the increased volume of 
work the service added to Check Im- 
printing, Mary Foresteire was trans- 
ferred at that, time from the Bookkeep- 
ing Department, to Check Imprinting. 
The department had previously made 
personalised checks for just our Special 
Checking Account customers. 

Check Imprinting which consists of 
Mary, and Johnie Carney is under the 
direction of John A. Wilshear, Jr., Sec- 
retary and' Treasurer and supervised by 
James V, Fagan, Assistant Secretary. 

Although the routine of the depart- 
ment, which is in, essence a small" print- 
shop, is simple — it is an exacting task 
that demands accuracy, precision, and 
an aptitude for detail. Basically, our 
customers names are printed on their 
personal checks, bound into folders, and 
mailed to them. This service is given to 
all our Special Checking Account, and 
Personal Checking Account customers 
without charge. 

As explained by Mary, after Address- 
ograph-Mail Department makes an ad- 
dressograph plate of the New Accounts, 
the Signature Sheets from which the in- 
formation, is taken are then forwarded 
.to her for Check Imprinting plates. 

Type is set by hand for the operation 
which although simple is interesting and 
one that - she thoroughly -enjoys: ^The 
plate is a composite material that is 
flexible and* durable. It measures about 
f ive-and-one-half inches in length and 
one-and-one-quarter inches 'in depth. In 
this area, are spaces for double or single 
signatures depending, on whether the ac- 
count may be signed by either person on 
a joint account, or by one person on a 
single account/ There is also a bottom 
line space which will be shortly used 
for code numbers. These will act in a 



dual capacity as a security measure, and 
as an added identification of the account. 

The type holder is attached to the 
edge of the plate and is used to lift the 
type out of the typesetter. When Mary 
has set a line of type she, slides it along 
the typeholder and onto the plate, where 
she locks it into postion with a rubber 
.wedge. The completed plate is then lock- 
ed on the machine which, operates like 
a rotary press, and the first impression 
is made on a brown envelope in which 
the plate is eventually stored, dated, 
marked to indicate it is a New Account, 
and filed alphabetically for future use. 
The first impression made on the envel- 
ope is also used as a proof of the signa- 
tures, for accuracy. In the case of a re-: 
order, this too is noted in code on the 
envelope and refiled for future use.. 

A Personalized Checkbook contains 
twenty checks, four deposit slips, and a 
reorder blank. These are run through 
the machine separately, with the result 
that the customer's name is imprinted 
on each individual form and check. They, 
are stapled into a binder together with 
a fly leaf on which is an advertising 
message reminding our customers of 
services in both our Commercial and 
Trust Departments. The checks are then 
inserted into a dark blue folder designed 
for the further convenience of our cus- 
tomers. 

As an initial start a New Account re- 
ceives one book of checks. The customer 
may however, reorder as many check- 
books as he wishes. As a reminder, the 
reorder tlank is inserted after the fif- 
teenth'checkrsohe canindicate the num- 
ber of checkbooks he wants and mail the 
information-to*us.*When Check Imprint- 
ing 4 completes the order, the checks are 
mailed to /the customer or held at the 
bank, according it<v instructions on the 
reorder* blank. $* * 

Some months the volume of check- 
books made : is heavier than at other 
times, but between New Accounts and 
(Continued on, Page 9) 



have you heard .. 

. . . That the reactivation of our Blood 
Bank has brought a very fine response. 
Individual pledges were recently passed 
around and signed with the result that 
the majority of co-workers are willing 
to donate ._. . Valentine's Day brought 
remembrances and gifts to many people 
throughout our bank, but a most ap- 
propriate one was the Bright Red Ponti- 
ac delivered to the John A, Wilshear, 
Jrs., (Sec. & Treas.) . . ,. Delighted too 
are the Albert J. Sokolls* (AVP) with 
their hew Impala . . . Likewise for Syl- 
via and Bob Jablonski , , . and Betty and 
Joe Krutzer with their Rambler Station 
Wagon plus trip to Daytona for the 500 
Races . . . That handsome little fellow 
you see on the United Fund Thank You 
Posters, is three-year-old Jon Jacobs, 
whose mother Jean is rightly oh-so- 
proud of him . . . Co-worker's Children 
Continue to Achieve, like Lorrie Cappo- 
lino, Yolie's daughter now a Cheerleader 
for Miami Shores Community House . „ . 
Dale, Kate Nelson's daughter, who is so 
accomplished on the piano she is now in 
the Professional Class * , fi and Claire 
Cruce's son Jeffrey who was "Leader 
For The Day" on his Fourth Birthday 
complete with party at school for 30 
classmates . . -. Animals too, play an 
important part in the private lives of 
co-workers — Gloria and Don Vick are 
very pleased with "Vickie's" 6 Airedale 
puppies . . . Two of the pups belonging 
to Maribel Neville's "Suzy" adopted by 
Harvey Draughon and Betty Krutzer are 
now "Skippy" and "Blackie" respective- 
ly, - . . Soft-hearted Bettye Neal spent 
her vacation tending to "Mutt" who had 
an ear operation . . . But saddened, were 
James V. Fagan's (AS) folks, with the 
passing of 17% year old "Billie Jo", a 
maltese cat- A rugged individualist 
"Billie Jo" loved fish "and ate it every 
chance he got EVEN^THO IT MADE 
HIM ILL— HE DES^PISiEi) MILK— IN- 
SISTED on drinking JjVATER from a 
GLASS — and was *MAD about 
OLIVES!! . . . And do;get*Merle Harper 
(AS) to tell you about her "Chariie 
Brown" who'RETRIEVES. (PS-Charlie's 
a CAT) . , . Then there was "Rowdy" 
(Continued on Page 10) 



"-\\\e 



\fcafl 



fceVi* 



\(\4 



\\ve 



T^ e 



o 



One of the more pronounced charac- 
teristics of Daniel C. Northrop, Vice 
President, is his sociability. It is a 
rarity when Mr. Northrop is not present 
at a gathering for both officers and per- 
sonnel, whether it is sponsored by the 
American Institute of Banking, or a 
"Checkmates" dance or picnic. Gregari- 
ous and affable — his presence at these 
affairs is so accepted as to be expected 
— and if he were not in attendance it 
is safe to assume his absence would be 
noticed and "something would be miss-, 
ing". However, his friendliness and 
geniality was evident even in his school 
days where in addition to his studies, 
he took part in many extra-curricular 
activities, 

Daniel Currie Northrop was born in 
St. Paul's, N. C, the youngest in a fami- 
ly of six that included three brothers, 
and two sisters. Born into a banking 
and a medical family, it is not strange 
that he too T is a banker. 

His father, the late Dr. Theodore 
McLean Northrop, was in addition to his 
medical practice, Chairman of the Board 
of the Bank of St. Paul's. An older 
brother, the late Theodore McGeachy 
Northrop, was also a doctor; and his 
brother H. Prank Northrop, has been 
Vice President at First National Bank 
of Miami for some years. 

In speaking of his father Mr. North- 
rop says witk pardonable pride, "My 
dad was a genuine 'horse and buggy' 
pioneer doctor, with a practice that cov- 
ered a considerable area in the Eastern 
part of North Carolina, Unfortunately 
he passed away when I was less than 
two years old, but my mother saw to it 
we were all raised properly and given* 
good educations." 

Mr. Northrop is a graduate of St. 
Paul's High School where he was a 
member of the Football, Basketball, and 
Baseball Teams, He continued his edu- 
cation at Presbyterian Jr. College, Max- 
ton, N. C, graduating in 1934 with a BS. 
While in Junior College he was Secre- 
tary-Treasurer of his Class, a member 



. . Daniel C. Northrop 



VICE PRESIDENT 




of the Glee Club, Phi Delta Pi, and was 
on the following teams: Football, (Quar- 
terback) '34; Basketball (Forward) '33 
'34; Tennis Team '33, '34. In 1934 he was 
Manager of the Tennis Team, and State 
Junior College Singles Champion for 
that year. 

After graduation he managed a serv- 
ice station in St. Paul's for about a year 
before coming to Miami. 

His banking career started at .the sug- 
gestion of his brother Frank, who got 
him his first job in, the Block Depart- 
ment, at First National Bank of Miami 
in October 1935. In recalling those days, 
Mr. Northrop said "at that time Charles 
E. Buker, who is now President of The 
Hialeah-Miami Springs Bank, The Air- 
port Bank of Miami, and The * North 
Hialeah Bank, was in charge of 'the 
Bookkeeping and Block Departments at 
First National." 

After about six months in Block he 
was transferred to the Bookkeeping De- 
partment where he remained until he 
was sent to our bank on November 1, 
1937, as a Burroughs operator in the 
Bookkeeping Department. "At that time" 




Mr. Northrop in 1934, when 
he graduated s from Presby- 
terian Junior College., 



Mr. Northrop said, "operators in Book- 
keeping and Block were all men. In fact 
about the only jobs women held in banks 
in those days were as receptionists or 
secretaries. However, in the early part 
of 1941, due to the drafting of men for 
World War II,- banks immediately began 
to train women as operators and as 
tellers," 

In April 1941, Mr. Northrop was in* 
ducted into the Armed Forces and be- 
came an Army Private stationed at Fort 
Barrancas, at Pensacola. He was later 
assigned to the Medical Corps, Station 
Hospital, Camp Davis, N. C, where lie 
became a S-Sgt. Being stationed at 
Camp Davis was "a break" for him, 
since "home was only 90 miles away." 

In the summer of 1943, all 1-A men 
were transferred to Combat Units, and 
he became a T-Sgt. in the 69th Infantry 
Division at Camp Shelby, Miss. As NCO 
in charge of a Platoon, it was his duty 
to train recruits in the basic fundament- 
als of combat. » 

This was highly ludicrous to Mr. 
Northrop because he, himself, had never 
had any Basic Training. As a result he 
had the dubious pleasure of staying up 
most of each night in order to learn the 
necessary material he had to teach the 
following day. About this particular 
period he states, "It was plenty rough." 

In the Spring of 1944, he was sent 
overseas and assigned to the Combat 
Unit of Company H, 34th Infantry, 
where as part of reinforcements for An- 
zio, .Italy he served under General Mark 
Clarke, It was while he was fighting in 
the mountains, above Florencer that he 
was hit by shrapnel and wounded in the 
left hand and T Jeg. 9* that particular 
battle he recalls' "the mortar barrage 
was so heavy" casualties amounted to 
two-thirds of <the* men^ under fire." 
Mr.. Northrop ,was hospitalized for 23 
days at Leghorn, a costal town about 90 
miles northeast of Rome. He remained 
there until V-E Day, was returned to 
the States, sent to Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Ten Year Milestone for Profit 

13 Fully Vested Tlirough Years of Sen 



Out bank makes a practice of giving us many fine benefits such as Christmas bonuses, 
free Insurance, Hospitalization, three-week vacations after five years service, and others. 
One of the finest rewards we receive is the privilege of participation in the Profit 
Sharing Retirement Plan. 

Our Profit Sharing Retirement Plan was instituted on December 31, 1953 with 26 
participants. As of December 31, 1?62 there were 69 officers and employees partici- 
pating. This, was announced at the January 17, 1963 Profit Sharing meeting which 
was conducted by Richard C. Boggs, Executive Vice President and Trust Officer; and 
George S. Ness, Senior Vice President and Comptroller. 



Of the original participants who remained 
at our bank through the years, 13 are fully 
vested through actual years of service, while 
one more participant became fully vested be- 
cause he had reached the normal retirement age. 

Not every bank or organization has a Profit 
Sharing Retirement Plan for its employees. 
As this year is a milestone of achievement for 
our Plan as well as its participants, it will be 
interesting to those who are not as yet eligible, 
to be aware of the value of the Profit Sharing 
Retirement Plan, and the benefits that are theirs 
to come. 

For clarification our Profit Sharing Retire- 
ment Plan is briefly explained in a series of 
questions and answers as follows : 

(Note: The Profit Sharing Retirement flan shall 
be referred to as PSRP for brevity.) 

Q—Wbat is the purpose of the PSRP? 

A— The purpose of the PSRP is to provide 
retirement and other benefits to em- 
ployees under a formula keyed to the 
profits of the bank, and to give recog- 
nition to those who remain with the 
bank and devote a special effort to 
promote* its success and profits. 

Q — When does a qualified employee become 
eligible for participation in the PSRP? 

A — All officers and employees who on De- 
cember 31 of any year have been in 
the continuous service of our bank for 
three years on that date shall be par- 
ticipants in the plan. 

Q— Are there any circumstances under which 
continuous service may be broken, yet not 
disqualify an employees participation in 
the PSRP? * 

A — Continuity of service shall riot be 
deemed broken while serving in the 
Armed forces or by any leave of ab- 
sence expressly granted by *he Board 
of Directors of the bank, provided the 
Participant returns to work within 90 



days from his discharge from active 
military service, or within ten days 
after the expiration of his leave 
granted by the Board of Directors. 
During the period a Participant is on 
leave, he will not share in the contribu- 
tions made by the bank to the fund, 
but his account will be credited with 
his proportionate part of the earnings 
of the Fund. 

J2 — How did the Fund start? 

A — By a contribution from the bank. AH 
contributions to the Fund are made by 
the bank on December 31st of each 
year or shortly thereafter. The first 
contribution was made on Dec. 31, 1952. 
The contributions which make up the 
fund are managed by the Trust De- 
partment and invested for the benefit 
of the Participants. 

The amount of money which the bank 
contributes to the Fund each year de- 
pends upon the earnings of the bank 
providing that certain earnings, after 
taxes, which exceed 10% of the Bank's 
capital funds, is contributed to the 
Fund. These annual contributions may 
amount to as much as 15% of* the 
salaries, exclusive of overtime and 
bonuses paid to all Participants. At 
the end of the year Dec. 31, 1962 our 
Profit Sharing Retirement Fund was 
valued at $353,787.16. 

Q—How is a Participant's share determined? 

A — Individual accounts are set up for each 
Participant. The annual contributions 
of the bank are allocated to these ac- 
counts in direct proportion to annual 
salaries. To each Participant's account 
is also added his pro rata share of the 
earnings on investments for the year 
and amounts forfeited by former Par- 
ticipants^ who left the employ of the 
bank before they were fully vested. 
At the end of the year the entire fund 



Sharing — Major Benefit 

ice Reach 100% 



is revalued at the then market value, 
and in turn the current market value 
of each Participant's account is de- 
termined. 

Q — if a participant is in the plan for three 
years and leaves the bank, is he permitted 
the full amount credited to his account at 
that time? 



Ja— 



No. He is entitled to only 30% of his 
share in the Fund, or 10% for each 
full year he has beenjn the Plan. Like- 
wise, if he were to leave at the end of 
four years he would be entitled to 40% 
— five years, 50%. 

Q— When is a Participant eligibU for 100% 
of the Funds credited to his account? 

A — Normally at the end of 10 full years 
participation in the plan; However, he 
may also have a full 100% when he 
has reached the normal retirement age, 
or if he dies (his share would then re- 
vert to the person or persons he had 
named as beneficiaries) or if he be- 
comes totally disabled while in the 
service of the bank, or if the PSRP be 
terminated. 

Q—Then the PSRP can be terminated? 

A — Yes. The Plan may be terminated at 
any time by the Board of Directors of 
the bank in which event no contribu- 
tion shall be made thereafter, except 
for a year preceding the year in which 
termination occurs. In this event all 
participants will get their full share of, 
funds credited to their accounts. Under 

\ no circumstances .would any part of the 

I fund revert to the bank. 

Q—What does Vested mean? 

. A — Immediately upon becoming a Partici- 

i pant, „ 10% of your account becomes 

vested. By "vested" is meant that por- 

\ tion of his account to which theJParti- 

cipant -is entitled , should he leave the 
employ of the bank. Each year there- 
after an additional 10% becomes vest- 
ed. At' the end of 10 years, a Partici- 
pant's; account is fully' vested. There- 
after, he is entitled to 100% of the 
balance of his account. If a Participant 

! leaves the employ of the bank prior to 

being in the Plan ten years,* he forfeits 
a portion of his account and the 
amount so forfeited will be credited to 

I the accounts of the ^remaining Partici- 

j pants. 



Q — When a Participant becomes eligible for his 
full 100% share in the Plan (providing he 
earned it on the basis of 10 full years of 
participation) would he receive the money 
at that time, and if he remained in the 
employe of the bank how would that 
affect his status in the Plan. 

A — Distribution will be made only when a 
Participant leaves the employ of the 
bank* If he has become fully vested 
after 10 years Participation and wishes 
to continue in the employe of the bank 
(provided he has not reached retire- 
ment age) he will continue to partici- 
pate in the plan with full benefits, for 
as long as he remains an employee s of 
the bank. 

£)— When an employee becomes eligible for the 
PSRP may it be interpreted as^ a n guar- 
antee" of job security? 

A — Neither the establishment of this plan 
nor the making of contributions by the 
bank shall be construed to confer upon 
any person any right to be, continued 
as an employee of the bank, and the 
bank reserves the right to discharge 
any employee whenever the interest of 
the bank in its sole judgment may so 
require. Any Participant who is dis- 
missed by the bank because of any 
fraudulent or criminal act, will forfeit 
jhis entire share in the Plan. 

2— Who is in charge of - the administration of 
our PSRP? 

A — Our PSRP is headed by two committees. 
James G. Garner, our President; Rich- 
ard C. Boggs, Executive Vice President 
and Trust Officer; and George S. Ness, 
Senior Vice President and Comptroller; 
constitute the Retirement Committee. 
As a Trust Account, our PSRP is han- 
dled' in the Trust Department under 
the direction of the^ Trust-Investments 
: Committee~whiclTincIudes Mr. Garner; 
Mr. Boggs; , William Baraket^ Vice 
President and Trust Officer; George S. 
Bugg, Jr., Trust Officer; and Edwin 
M. Graham, iVice President. Mr. Ness 
is responsible for all. records of indi- 
vidual participants in the Plan. 

Q — Is there any reference material on file re- 
garding the PSRP that "is accessible to 
employees? 

A— The Trust Department has the complete 
-Plan 'and Trust Agreement which ex- 
plans the PSRP in detail. This is avail- 
f Continued on Page 10) 



The Welcome Mat 



CAKOLYX CLINTON — Block . . . Formerly 
* from Jacksonville, Fla.. where she graduated 
from Paxon High School. Worked in the Proof 
Departments of three Jacksonville banks , , , 
Barnett National, Florida National, and Central 
- —National.^ Carolyn,, has four children, Debra G, 
Susan 4i jtfichael 3, RanaV IS^months.^ Likes ~ 
dancing^ and boating. 

* ♦ * 

BARBARA JAMBS — Block . . - A native New. 
Yorker, Barbara worked in the Proof Dept, at 
Federal Reserve Bank for about two years. Came 
to Miami very recently; is living with her aunt 
and uncle, the J. Sarlies\ Attends Holy Family 
Catholic Church; likes* to swim, sun bathe, and 
enjoy our fair clime. 

* * * 

MARY ANN DAGUE — Bookkeeping , - ,. A 
graduate of Terry Parker High School, 'Jackson- 
ville, where she was born, this is Mary Ann's 
first position. Came to "Miami very recently: 
attends Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic 
Church: likes horseback riding "and roller skating* 

* - * •. 

MARY FLETCHER— Bookkeeping ... A native 
Miamian, and a graduate of Hialeah High School 
where she was a member of Modern Music Mast' 
ers. Mary attends Church of the Resurrection 
and teaches kindergarten. Likes sports, is very 
interested in Music. Plays piano and is attend- 
ing night classes at Dade County Junior College 
where she Is taking a music course, and hopes 
to achieve a degree in church music. 



CATHERINE PORTER — Bookkeeping , . . From 
Cape Cod, Mass., Catherine has been in Miami for 
v about 7 years. Is a graduate of Jackson High 
School and has worked as a bookkeeper for local 
firms, Catherine is engaged to Thomas Van 
Buren. Likes to read, and listen to records. 



SARAH STEPHENS — Bookkeeping < . .-A grad- 
uate of Miami Edison High School, Sarah also 
went to Dade Junior College. Attends First 
Church of Christy Scientist: likes sports, espe- 
cially bowling and water skiing. 



VIRGINIA IIONEYCUTT — Loan . . .^Cairtieir 
"Lyn". A graduate of Miami Edison; attended 
Atlantic Christian College at Wilson, N. C, 
Worked for a local finance company: is married 
to Jim, and has a son JTimmy. 16 months. 
Attends First Christian Church of North Dade: 
Is an alumna of Little River Rainbow Girls. 
Likes to bow], sew and swim. 



BARBARA McCARREN — Loan Stenographer 
, . . Formerly from East St. Louis. Mo.. Barbara 
has been a civilian employee with the Govern- 
ment as a Secretary at Headquarters Air Training 
Command, Scott Air Force Base, III., and with 
the Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis, Mo. 
Came to Miami in 1057 to be a stewardess for 
EAL, and married Francis less than a year later. 
Attends St. Rose of . Lima Catholic Church where 
she Is a member of the- Altar Guild. Likes to 
read. 



HARRIETTE PADGETT — Trust and Mortgage 
Loan Departments % . . From Wellsboro, Pa„ 
where she worked in the business office of the 
telephone company. Came to Florida in October 
with her mother; attends St. John's Episcopal 
Church in Hollywood, where they, reside. Is a 
member of the DAR for which she served as Vice 
Regent, and of the DAC. Plays the piano and 
pipe organ. Was assistant church organist In 
Wellsboro, and made many local appearances there 
as a soprano soloist. Likes swimming and 
boating. 






t 



NORTHROP from Page 5 
and was eventually Honorable Dis- 
charged soon after V-J Day, 

For his bravery in action Mr. North- 
rop was awarded the Bronze Star, and 
the Purple Heart. 




Mr. Northrop with "two friends' 
on the Prado in Cuba, 1946. 



Following his discharge he returned 
to our bank on Oct 15, 1945 and re- 
sumed* his duties in the Bookkeeping 
Dept Of the men in our bank who serv- 
ed in the Armed Forces he was one of 
the first to return. 

Approximately six months later, he 
was elevated to the position of Head 
Bookkeeper, and in March 1947, was 
elected to the position of Assistant Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. Mr. Northrop became 
an Assistant Secretary in June 1948; an 
Assistant Vice President in March 1952; 
and a Vice President in December 1956. 

As an Assistant Secretary, Mr- North- 
rop worked in our New Accounts De- 
partment for several years where he 
okayed checks, arranged for small loans, 
and continued to be responsible for the 
Bookkeeping Department. Because our 
bank was smaller at that time, an Offi- 
cer's individual duties were necessarily 
of wider scope. 

When, he reached the rank of Assist- 
ant Vice President he "moved over" to 
(Continued on Page 10) 



Bugg Promoted to Higher Rank 
Swan Makes ATO 



At the January meeting of the Board of Directors, George S. Bugg, Jr. was pro- 
moted to the rank of Trust Officer; and Richard G. Swan was elected an Assistant 
Trust Officer. 

Mr. Bugg came to our bank on August 6, 1962 from Woodbury, N. J, where he 
was an Assistant Trust Officer at First County National Bank and Trust Company- 
He has a background of approximately twenty-five years in banking and trust; 




and is a graduate of 



\Hv;r i The Stonier School of 
^\ f* \l Banking, Rutgers 
» ^ I u n i vers i ty> N. j. 
where he specialized 
in Trust. At the Au- 
gust 13 Board meet- 
ing he was elected to 
BUGG the position of Assist- 

ant Trust Officer, which post he held 
until his recent promotion. 

Mr. Swan has been with our bank 
since March 16, 1959, and ' has worked 
in the Trust Department since that time. 
His first duties in Trust Accounting re- 
sulted in his being put in charge of the 

department in 1960. In September of 

* 

FORESTEIRE from page 3 
reorders, the girls average about 5,000 
checkbooks per month or approximately 
100,000 checks. 

Personalized Checks are not only a 
convenience to our customers but have 
advantages for our bank too. The print- 
ed signatures are a definite aid to the 
Bookkeepers for identification in posting 
and in filing . . . and in, the numerous 
operations in which checks are routed 
through various departments the im-? 
printing of the customer's name has 
raised overall efficiency and accuracy of 
handling. 

Although the work is uncomplicated it 
is thoroughly enjoyed by Mary, whose 
sincerity and liking for her job is evi- 
dent. Mary Foresteire earne to Miami 
from Worchester, Mass. about ten years 
ago. Working in our bank is the first 
time she has been employed, although 




1962 he was promoted to Trust Admin- 
istrator. He held that position until his 
recent election by the Board of Di- 
rectors. Mr. Swan attended the Uni- 
versity of Florida where he majored 
in Accounting and 
Business Administra- 
tion. He has also 
taken Trust I, an 
American Institute of 
Banking Course; and 
is a graduate of the 
Trust Training School 
SWAN sponsored by the 

Trust Division of the Florida Bankers 
Association at the University in Gaines- 
ville. 

raising four daughters, and a son, can 
hardly be termed "doing nothing". 

It is difficult to imagine this small, 
enthusiastic person as a grandmother of 
seventeen grandchildren. But it was this 
same enthusiasm and zest to keep busy 
that made her decide to work, because 
"with the children grown and- out on 
their own, there 'just wasn't enough to 
do at home." 

In addition to her work, and her duties 
at home, she has several other interests. 
Mary is Founder President of the Ro- 
sary Making Club at Our Lady of Per- 
petual Help, in Opa Locka, and now 
serves as its Treasurer. Her hobbies are 
varied and interesting and include up- 
holstering, sewing; making stuffed ani- 
mals, and Marzipan Fruit decorations 
for cakes which <are wonderfully pro- 
fessional in appearance and from all re- 
ports — equally good to eat. 



HAVE YOU HEARD from page 4 

(10 in. Black Poodle) Helfman, who 
spent several weeks here with the 
Walter Helfman's (Earl's folks) of She- 
boygan, Wise. "Rowdy" made quite a 
"debut" the day he visited our premises 
. . . WEDDINGS — Wonderful Surprise 
to us all was the wedding of the iormer 
Joan Smith t<t Gordon~Grigsby on Jan. 
24. -Lorraine Auf ford and Jack Riley 
stood up for the couple who was mar- 
ried in a local judge's chambers. A 
Wedding Supper followed at the Alca- 
zar, and friends of the Bride, Elaine 
Richardson and Iola Saunders gave her 
a post-wedding shower. Happiness to 
you Both! s /[Happiness too, is extend- 
ed to new co-worker and new Bride, 
Mary Ann Dague who married Norman 
on Jan. Zl at Christ The King Church 
in Jacksonville . . . And congratulations 
to Bud Berger, Carol's brother, who wed 
Shirley Carson Feb. 11 at Holy Cross 
Lutheran Church . . . VISITS 'N VISI- 
TORS — "Sandy" Burgos visited in 
Puerto Rico to be with husband Ralph 
who is in plane cargo business there . . . 
Pauline and Howard McEIhaney enter- 
tained the John Gallian's, Detroit rela- 
tives . . . and Dorothy Stroyvus with 
husband John (who recently returned 
from Saigon) vacationed in Washington 
and N.. J. . . . Anticipating are Isabel 
and John McArthur, sometime in July 
and Mary Foresteire became a Grand- 
mother for the 17th Time on Feb. 8 
when daughter Mary Cresswell had 
William ,. . . THIS >N THAT . . . Edwin 
M. Graham (VP) is now prexy of Little 
River Commerce Assoc . . . Cadwalader 
Woodville, Jr. (VP) is a VIP as a Di- 
rector of the Dade County Grand Juror's 
Association . . . William Baraket, (VP& 
TO) is presently serving on the Grand 
Jury . . . George S. Ness (Sr. VP & 
Comp.) spoke at recent NABAC Clinic 
on "Control of Income and Expenses" 
. . . Bob Forbes entertaining his parents 
the Edward B. Forbes' of Waverly, N. Y. 
in his new complete-with-swimming-pool 
home in Miramar . . . Leroy Stebbins 
annual Birthday Celebration took place 
Feb. 8 . . . Dorothy Sweeney won a 25§ 
value "bushel of groceries" at a local 
chain store . . . and Dottie Morris re- 
ceived a "Heartwarming 1 Housewarming" 
from Co-workers who* gifted her with 
items for her new Miami Springs Apt. 
. . . DEPARTMENTAL CHANGES — 
William Knapp from Parking Lot to 
Coin Teller . . . Johnie Carney from 
Bookkeeping to Check Imprinting v a * 
Jacqueline Cravero from Check Imprint- 
ing to Bookkeeping . . . Sylvia Jablonski 



NORTHROP from page 8 

the desk of the late Frank L. McMillan, 
Vice President; and has continued to be 
Jn the Commercial Loan Department 
since that time. In addition to his Loan 
duties he supervises —Bookkeeping, 
Analysis, and Information Departments, 
and is responsible for final approval of 
all checks returned by the Bookkeeping 
Department each day. 

During the time he was being pro- 
moted through the ranks, Mr. Northrop 
took American Institute of Banking 
courses in Principles of Bank Opera- 
tion; Commercial Law, Effective Letter 
Writing, and Analyzing Financial State- 
ments. He is a strong advocate of A.I.B. 
classes and states "I found them to be 
of great value in furthering my bank- 
ing career, and highly recommend A:I.B. 
courses to all those in the banking field." 

Mr. Northrop is a member of Miami 
Showmen's Association, a Charter Mem- 
ber of North Miami Elks Lodge, mem- 
ber of Miami Shores Men's Club, Great- 
er Miami Credit Association, and Ameri- 
can Institute of Banking for which he 
served on the Board of Governors. 

While he and Mrs, Northrop attend 
church locally, Mr. Northrop still re- 
tains membership in the Presbyterian 
Church of St. Paul's in his hometown. 
Although he no longer participates „in 
active sports, he is an avid fisherman, 
and enjoys swimming. 



PSRP from page 7 

able at all times to any employee in- 
terested in reading it. Every Partici- 
pant is urged to read and understand 
it. To obtain' the file, contact Richard G. 
Swan, Assistant Trust Officer, 

The Profit Sharing Retirement Plan affords 
a distinct opportunity for employees who 
desire to make a career of banking with lis. 
It enables them to build an estate outside 
of their regular salary, and is a reward for 
their continued efforts and meritorious 
service to assure the Bank's profitable opera- 
tion, which in turn makes it possible for the 
employees to share in the Bank's earnings. 

Management feels that a satisfied employee 
who has some security to look forward to 
will be a happier employee. This will 
reflect in his job efficiency and extra-will- 
ingness to be of service to our customers — 
without whom — there wouldn't be any 
work to come to. 



from Trust Accounting to Secretary to 
George S. Bugg, Jr. (TO) . . . Jean Bar- 
ney from Block to Bookkeeping . . . AND 
WELCOME BACK — Frances 'Hibbert, 
Lillian Friedrick, and Herbert Johnson. 



10 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU 



a 



MQ.j3'jj j u n hi' 



Ina Claypool — Bookkeeping ,.„„ 
Martha Ramey — Switchboad .... 
Joan Jones — Block ™.«™«.., w .... 



APRIL 

. 1 

...^ 3 

_ 7 



June Browne — Secretary to 
Miss Harper ™*™„ 



Patience Hunter — Block 



Virgina Asbury — Bookkeeping 
Cadwalader Woodville, Jr. — 



Vice President 



Herbert Johnson — Parking Lot , 

Paul h. Rockafellar— 

Assistant Vice President „. 

Dorothy Wallace — Secretary to 
Mr. Bartlett _„ _ 



9 
12 
13 

14 
16 

16 



Elsie Wear— Teller _ 



-^^^ 19 
,^.__,„ 24 

Walter Donahue — Parking Lot ^^.w- 26 
Arthur Oliver — Parking Lot ^*™,„.,„ 26 
Eugenia Gallub — Bookkeeping „~*~*» 30 



?-*= 



MAY 
' Frank Vecchione — Coin Teller ,_„-____ 4 

Mae Teubher— Teller ™„ - 6 



Barbara James — Block » 

Betty Hamilton — Loan , : 

De Merle L. Harper — 
Assistant Secretary 



.. 12 



12 



Harvey Draughon — Guard .„^„.„™„ 24 

,^.,„_ 25 
*_ 26 
21 



Sharon Ogden — Loan ^. 

Ann Nordin — Bookkeeping 



Katie Sweat— Teller 



Catherine Porter — Bookkeeping _^ 30 



#>"<) fl./fr j I jj rjixj j p 



New Machines in Block 



Innovation in our Block Department was the recent installation of six, 32-pocket 
IBM Machines, The new machines permit us to sort checks to different banks. This 
operation was not possible with the former 24-pocket apparatus. 

Instead of sending checks to First National Bank in one grouping, we can now 
"batch clear" the checks to individual banks, and in so doing help to expedite their 
handling at First National. 

The new machines are so highly geared that once the operators are familiar with 
the increased number of pockets, the time it will take to operate the additional keys, 
will be almost negligible* 

11 




personally speaking... 



Not too long ago a discussion took place about the merits of getting a supply 
of J. Edgar Hoover's book "Masters of Deceit" so that co-workers could read it 




and become awareTof 'f ffiTdangers of Communisrinfiiiraiion. 

Pros and cons were weighed. Although the idea was considered excellent there 
was some hesitation as to how it would be received. Based on the theory that if 
only one person — read the book — and got something from it — the project 
would.not be u a total Joss", local book shelves were searched and seven paperback 
copies were found and purchased. 

Posters were made telling co-workers about the books and stressing the fact (n 

that you really can't FIGHT COMMUNISM — if you don't KNOW SOMETHING 
ABpUT IT M 

The response was amazing! While the first poster was being put up . . . 
no less than four co-workers requested copies^ of the book . . . before the last 
piece of tape had been applied to hold the sign in place. 

Within a half-hour after both posters were up . . . the entire stock of seven 
copies had been given out . . . and a substantial waiting list -had started. As we 
go to press out 6f approximately 134 co-workers . , -. 30 have already read 
"Masters of Deceit" — - or about 22\k% of, personnel* This excludes Officers who A 
have both read and purchased the book. 

Co-workers too; expressed the opinion that ihey had bought or were going 
to buy it for further study; and by bringing it into their homes it was introduced to 
members of their families who also read it. 

There are other books on the evils of Communism that are fine and as factual 
as Mr. Hoover's . . . but the reception his received is most gratifying. 

The interest it* has stirred up and continues to provoke proves that it does pay 
to exert that extra effort and "bring the mountain to Mohammed". ]j 

Copies of "Masters of Deceit" are still avail- - I 

able . . . and its contents just as important and yOL^a^*^ l 

pertinent today ... as they were last week 
and last month. 

All you have to do to get a copy 



LITTLE RIVER BANK and TRUST COMPANY 

Gatnpiete Banking 

and ^buit Service 




.^iJj 




ANK 



o ♦ o 




Septctttk&i. f$>(?f 




LITTLE RIVER BANK and TRUST COMPANY 



8017 NORTHEAST 2*» AVENUE 



MIAMI. FLORIDA 



BARIKaaa 

NOTES 




Vol. 4 



-No.~5_ 



. . . Dedicated to Progress . . . Through 
Mutual Understanding and Apprecia- 
tion for each other. 

ADVISORY BOARD 

DANIEL C. NORTHROP 
Vice President 

EDWIN M. GRAHAM 
Vice President 

• * * • 

EDITOR 

LYNN D. BROWNE 

* * * * 

STAFF 

Lorraine Aufford 

Inez Fasig 
Judith Kaufmann 

Mae Teubner 
Dorothy Wallace 



sfjea 



LdSESg 



mcVei 




Member South Florida Industrial Editors Association 

Southern Council Editors Association 

International Council of Industrial Editors 



Contents 

About the Cover,.*...*.* *„. 2 

Our 35th Anniversary*,..,. ... 3 

Have You Heard..;...... ,.„... 4 

Woman Behind- the Title.,,....,.. 4-5 

Happy Birthday v..**,. ...>*...•. 8 

The Welcome Mat. ,,..,.*.,.. 9 

What's In It For Me?,*.,..,....,.,. 9 

In Memorium .,...>.*.*,., ...... 10 



Special Message 



„ 11 



Personally Speaking.... Back Cover 

ABOUT THE COVER • • • 

August 9, 1961, the anniversary 
of our 35th Year was made espe- 
cially enjoyable with the gift of a 
3-tiered cake sent us courtesy of 
Mr. George Karnegis, president of 
Royal Baking Company, Miami, 
Florida. 

Mr. Garner, our president, is 
shown surrounded by officers and 
personnel as he cut the cake, 
which was enjoyed by all. 

To Mr. Karnegis, our sincere 
thanks for his thoughtfulness, and 
as for the cake — it was every bit 
as delicious as- it was delightful to 
see. 




It was on a Monday morning, 
35 years ago — that our bank 
opened its doors, prepared to serve 
the banking needs of the commun- 
ity. The date was August 9, 1926 
— :the time, 9 a. m. The location 
was the northwest corner of 79th 
Street and Northeast 2nd Avenue, 
the site now occupied by the Little 
River Drug Store. 

* Shortly after our bank opened 
it became a "casualty" of the. his- 
torical 1926 hurricane — ^ which 
devastated much of Miami. It suf- 
fered rather severely from the-dis- 
aster, but plans for rebuilding were 
immediately put 'into effect, to- 
gether with its first expansion, in 
which we took over several stores 
on Northeast 2nd Avenue (then 
the Old Dixie Highway). 



This was the first of many ex- 

it, 

pansions in the size of our build- 
ing, as well as personnel, to .take 
care of the banking needs of the 
area. 

It is indicative of the soundness 
of our bank, its importance to the 
area, and the place it holds in the 
community . . . when you realize 
it weathered not only the 1926 
hurricane — but came through the 
National Depression of that era, 
during the years .1926-1933. 

Our first president was Landon 
E. TEdwards, who served from 
1926-1932. He was succeeded by 
James G. Garner, Chairman of the 
Board and President, who served 
1932-1936; was re-elected in 1947, 
and has> been our president since 

(Continued on Page 6) 



r?We tyocc ^earid 



• • • 

. . . that on completion of A J.B. study 
courses, and provided you pass — our 
Bank reimburses you in FULL.^-, paying 
your A.LB. dues for the year? This is 
one of the many Fringe Benefits you get 
in addition to the knowledge you acquire. 
Altho A.I.B. Classes began Tuesday, it 
still' isn't too late to enroll, PROVIDED 
you're an -A.LB. .member. The Member- 
ship Drive will continue for 'some* time, 
and is open to everyone. For informa- 
tion, see John A. Wllshear, Jr. (AVP), 
and Dick Swan, plus Consuls "Jimmie" 
Tooker, Lorraine Aufford, Jean Sistrunk, 
and Joan Smith . , . Well, the recent 
Weddings, of which we had quite a few, 
are beginning to follow the natural 
course of events. Peggy and Dick Kent 
rate Congratulations on the birth of 
Richard Walter, born Aug. 28, weight 
6Y2 lbs. ... In the "Expectant Parents" 
category are Jean and James Sistrunk, 
and Carol and Dick Swan . . . That 
"familiar face" we see here and there 
around the bank is Roberta Alberti, who 
part-times for vacationing co-workers . . . 
And it's Welcome Back— to Agnes Uvino, 
who, after an absence of several years, 
is once more in Analysis . . . 'Twas 
mighty nice of the girls to make our 
Cafeteria so festive with bowls of 
Flowers for our 35th Birthday on Aug. 
9th. Gladys Haldy, Katharine Evers and 
Vivian LaPorte do so many thoughtful' 
things we could almost forget to be ap- 
preciative . . . And did you know Kath- 
arine arid Paul Evers daughter Peggy 
ranked 41st out of 505 in her graduating 
class at Jackson? Also this is the third 
summer Peggy has been a counselor at 
Allapattah YMCA Day Camp and is so 
capable she was featured in a local daily. 
Also Peggy became Mrs. Joseph Wcirick, 
in July. Also Katharine and Paul are 
mighty proud of her! . . . Proud too, is 
Forrest Nielsen of wife Mabel who is 
2nd highest in her Pre-Clinical Class at 
Lindsey Hopkins, and ranks 4th highest 
in the State. She will ultimately be a 
Licensed Practical Nurse and is present- 
ly with Memorial Hospital in Hollywood. 
(Continued on Page 10) 






(Editor's Note; Exception to the rule, is 
Miss Harper, our only Woman Officer, 
whose story appears in the space usually 
reserved for "Man Behind the Title" series.) 

Born De Merle Louise Harper, in Mar- 
vel, Alabama, she was one of a family 
of seven girls, and two boys. Being a 
member of a large family, probably ac- 
counts for her present day liking for peo- 
ple, which is expressed in her large 
circle of friends and acquaintances. 

Following her graduation from Warrior 
High School, Warrior, Ala., Miss Harper 
came to Miami to visit family friends 
and like so many others, decided to re- 
main here. Although still in her teens, 
she proved even then to have plenty of 
the drive which resulted in her present 
day success. For two years she attended 
evening classes at Charron-Williams 
Commercial College, while working days 
as a cashier, and then as Assistant Book- 
keeper with a local dry cleaning and 
laundry service. 

In 1944, Miss Harper moved to Key 
West and was employed in the Block 
Department of First National Bank of 
Key West, now the Florida National Bank 
of Key West. Six months later she re- 
turned to Miami, and was with Florida 
National of Miami. She began in the 
Bookkeeping Department, after a short 
time became a Teller, and then was 
promoted to head of the Transit 
Department. 

In thinking back on those days Miss 
Harper remarked that "although tills 
was during the War (World War II) all 
women personnel was required to wear 
stockings— which at that time presented 
a real problem. In addition Tellers had 
to wear uniform green jackets, were 
cautioned against using heavy makeup, 
extreme costume jewelry, flowers in 
their hair and indulging in other per- 



. . . De Merle L. Harper 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 



sonal eccentricities of dress/' She went 
on to say, "the jackets were quite be- 
coming . . . and really an advantage as 
we never had to be lectured about plung* 
ing necklines and sunback dresses." 

Again leaving Miami she journeyed to 
Denver, Colorado, where she worked in 
the Bookkeeping Dept. at Denver Na- 
tional Bank. After a short time she went 
home to her folks, who then resided in 
Birmingham, Ala., and became a Teller 
at Birmingham Trust National Bank. 





Miss Harper, left, instructs a pupil 
at the Roney Plaza, 



In September 1945, 
Miss Harper return- 
ed to Miami, and 
worked at Riverside 
Bank. She started in Bookkeeping, then' 
became a Teller; was trained to do 
General Books, and also worked in vari- 
ous other departments. She remained at 
Riverside, Bank for about four years, and 
it was during this time that Miss Harper 
became interested in Tennis, Henderson 
Park was her "proving ground" with 
nights and weekends devoted to master- 
ing the sport. 

The result was that she reached "pro" 
status, left the banking field, and became 
a Tennis Instructor. Miss Harper taught 
during ^the winter season at the Roney 
Plaza Hotel, Miami Beach; and in the 
summer at Mt. Washington Hotel in New 
Hampshire. 

She just about "glows" when speaking 
of this particular period when she had 
the pleasure of instructing many wealthy 
and socially prominent people, as> well 
as celebrities such as Rita Hay worth, 
"much prettier in person and real down- 
to-earth;" Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, 
"completely 'wacky' and always trying 
to upset the game with their antics," 
Tony Martin and Cyd Charisse, "she 
is very charming and extremely shy. 
A really naturally beautiful girl;" Rudy 
Valle, "very arrogant;" Jose Ferrar, 
"another shy, pleasant person;" Eleanor 
Holm, "a doll;" and many others. "Most 
cele brities" she added, "took up tennis 
to keep in trim, or lose weight. Many of L 
them eventually became very good at 
the game/ 9 

Miss Harper also participated in, ex- 
hibition games, with Tennis Champions, 
Bobby Riggs a "Davis Cup Winner;" 
I?ancho Segura~and in addition took part 
in many local club tournaments. 

While being a Tennis Instructor was a 
(Continued on Page 8) 




1926 



(Continued VronrVagei)^ 

that time. It is interesting to note 
that Mr. Garner has been with our 
bank since its opening day. 

Progress brought changes to our 
bank, with a most significant one 
taking place in the year 1937, 
when we located at our present 
site. Since that time we have had 
several major expansions which, 
coupled with the years we have 
been established, has earned us the 
reputation of being the "Oldest 
and Largest Banking Center in 
Northern Dade." 

Our present building was first 
expanded in the year 1949, with a 
three-story addition to the rear of 
the bank. 

In 1951, we established our first 
drive-in teller windows, and in- 
creased the size of our parking lot 
to accommodate customers with 
free parking facilities. 

Our bank was "leveled off" in 
1953 with the addition of a third 
floor on the front of the building. 
This now houses our Trust Depart- 
ment (which formerly occupied a 



small area in the main lobby) ; Mr. 
Garner's private office; a private 
office for Richard C. Boggs, Exec- 
utive Vice President and Trust 
Officer; the Board Room, and vari- 
ous other offices and departments, 
including Mortgage Loans. 

In 1958, our most recent expan- 
sion took place when, a consider- 
able extension of 15,000 square 
feet was added to the rear of our 
building. On the ground level are 
3 walk-up and 6 drive-in teller 
windows . . . streamlined, and de- 
signed for efficient operation for 
the convenience of customers who 
do not wish to enter the lobby to 
do their banking. 

Bridging the outdoor teller fa- 
cilities is the mezzanine, which 
allows vitally needed space and 
better working conditions for 
Auditing, Block, Addressograph- 
Mail, Personnel, and Analysis De- 
partments; in addition to 
executive offices, a rec- 
ord vault, and a confer- 
ence room. The top floor 
contains, the stock room 



Si 




and ample storage space. 

With the addition of the 1958 
expansion, space was made avail- 
able for larger switchboard and 
telephone facilities; and a cafeteria 
which is enjoyed by officers and 
personnel. Our cafeteria is noted 
for its relaxing atmosphere and 
delicious home-cooking. 

There have been quite a few 
changes since our bank was first 
founded, many of which were ex- 
perienced by several of our senior 
officers — Raymond E. Morlock, 
Senior Vice President, has been 
here, since 1933; Walter W. Asmus, 
Vice President and Treasurer, 
1940; Richard C. Boggs, Executive 
Vice President and Trust Officer, 
1947, and Cadwalader Woodville, 
Jr., Vice President and Secretary, 
since 1950. 

To have reached a 35th Anni- 
versary in the. banking field in 
Miami is no small achievement. As 



recent as 1900, Little River was 
just one of several very early set- 
tlements, and when our bank 
opened in 1926, the territory sur- 
rounding Little River was still pri- 
marily undeveloped. 

In looking back over the growth 
of our bank since its founding, our 
president, Mr. Garner, states, 
"// is gratifying to realize that we have 
grown steadily and progressed with 
the changing times. It is equally 
important, to continue to hold the 
place we have established, in the com- 
munity. This can only be accom- 
plished through the cooperation of 
each and every officer and employee. 
Service to our customers — has been, 
and will continue to be our aim. To 
that purpose we must dedicate our- 
selves, so that our bank will maintain 
the fine record it has enjoyed for the 
past thirty-five years." 




1961 



cM~ah.h.u ^Hittnacuf to Hjoui 



! 




OCTOBER 

James G- Garner^Chairman of the 

Board and President .,„ 

Betty Rogers— Bookkeeping 

Richard C. Boggs— Executive Vice 

President and Trust Officer ... 

Bettye Neal— Teller „„.„.w.~~~ *..„„ 

Catherine Deans-^-Teller 21 

Virginia Hackbarth— Teller „ 28 

Lynn Leonard— Block ....-., , 31 



8 

9 

13 
16 



Raymond E. Morlock— 
Senior Vice President 
Henry Walker— Loans 



NOVEMBER 



Rosemary Winters^-BIock ^„™— ^_ 9 

Gerhard Schauer— Block , , 10 

Maxine Scroggs— Trust ^--«»- I 6 

Gale West-Head Teller „., «■„„ 17 

Edwardine White— Loans „.— 19 

Sandra Spiess— Secretary to Mr. Bell.. 20 
Mary Jane Spahr^Bookkeeping ,„™„ 21 

Caroline Curran— Teller .. „„mu „.» 22 

Anne MacNulty— Block „.„ ,..». «, 23 

JoAnn Fuscoe^Teller *.„..„,».», 28 

Harriet Guise— Bookkeeping 29 

Richard Kent^-Teller .„.. .-« 29 




(Continued from Page 5) 
very pleasant and glamorous way of life, 
Miss Harper basically desired a more 
substantial and secure future. Conse- 
quently, she returned to the banking 
field, and entered our bank on February 
29, 1952. 

Although she began working on the 
dummy and the phones in our Bookkeep- 
ing Department, it' was nol too long after, 
that she became a "floater" and added 
to her already considerable experience. 
Eventually transferred to the Installment 
Loan Department, Miss Harper took a 
keen interest in Loans, and because she 
felt she had finally found her forte' be- 
gan taking American Institute of Banking 
courses to further her careen 

From Installment Loans she was trans- 
ferred to 'Commercial Loans, and finally 
Mortgage Loans, which department is 
now under her jurisdiction. Her hard 
work and initiative resulted in her be- 
coming an Officer of our bank, and in 
July 1955, she was elected to the position 
of Assistant Secretary. 

Miss Harper is a member of American 
Bank Woman's Association; Mortgage 
Banker's Association; and Home Build- 
ers' Association. She has served on the 
Board of Governors for the Miami Chap- 



ter, American Institute of Banking; was 
A.LB. Woman's Committee Chairman; 
and Secretary for the A.LB. National 
Convention held in Miami, 1955. 

When asked to state her views on the 
importance of women in the banking 
field Miss Harper referred to an article 
entitled "Women in Banking" which she 
had written for the April 1954 issue, of 
"Land 0' Sun Banker." 

Excerpts reprinted from her article as 
follows : 

"The importance of women in banking 
is becoming more widely recognized* Their 
warm and natural ability to understand has 
aided in creating a friendlier relationship 
with the public. Some aspects of banking 
requires the thoroughness that is character- 
istic of women* 

"Contrary to popular belief, the oppor* 
tuniiy for women in banking is greater than 
appears on the surface; however, it means 
conquering new horizons* The complacency 
of most women in their fobs can be traced 
to the fact that the individual has little 
desire to do other than rest content as a 
creature of habit. 

"Each aspect of banking is so related to 
another that with use of her powers of ob' 
serration and a sensitivity to suggestions, one 
(Continued on Page 11) 



THE WELCOME MAT 



SALLY BROE— Bookkeeping . . . Origin- 
ally from Greenville, Ala.; Sally is a 
graduate of North Miami Hi, where she 
was a "cheerleader." Attended Univer- 
sity of Florida for one year. Worked 
locally as a salesclerk; attends St. Rose 
of Lima Catholic Church; likes water 
sports. 

EVELYN BYRD— Bookkeeping . . . Tefft, 
Indiana (population 200), is her home 
town. Formerly worked in the Bookkeep- 
ing Departments of Bank of California, 
Berkley, Calif., and Florida National, 
Miami. Evelyn attends Church of Christ; 
enjoys doing oils, and sews her own 
wardrobe. 

DOLORES CORDOVA— Bookkeeping . , . 
Born in Lynn, Mass., Dolores previously 
worked in the Bookkeeping Dept at Com- 
munity National Bank for about a year. 
Went to New York City, and worked in 
a secretarial capacity. Returned to Mi- 
ami, and came to our bank. Attends Holy 
Family Catholic Church; likes to swim, 
and dance., 

MARY GENTILE^-Bookkeeper ... A 
native of Boston Mass., Mary has lived 
in Miami for the past 14 years. Before 
coming .here, worked, at Miami National 
2% years, and First National of Miami 
Beach 3 years, in the Bookkeeping De- 
partments. Has two children, Janice 11, 
and Ward 8. Attends St, John Catholic 
Church. 

ALICE HENDERSON— Bookkeeping , . . 
Call her Yvonne, (her middle name). A 
native Miamian, she is a June graduate 
of Miami Edison Hi where she was an 
"Opti-Miss," and served as its Chaplain. 
Attends Allapattah Baptist Church, and 
sings in the choir. Likes to bowl. 

SARA KULOK^-Bookkeeping ... A na- 
tive of Argentina, Sara came to the 
United States with her father and event- 
ually became a citizen. Previously work- 
ed at Mercantile National Bank, in the 
Bookkeeping Dept. Has two children 
Liliana 2, and Arnold 3%. Likes to paint, 
and says she did ballet with a group at 
the Argentine Theatre of Buenos Aires. 

ROSEMARY O'ROURKE^New Accounts 

Secretary ... A June graduate of Notre 
Dame Academy, this is Rosemary's first 
position. She is a member of "Debs" 
which does volunteer work for the Re- 
habilitation Center, and the Heart Fund. 
Likes swimming and tennis, and attends 
St. Lawrence Catholic Church. Is quite 
-thrilled" with her first job. 

EDWARD HERRSCHAFT— Parking Lot 

... Ed has been in Miami about 12 
years, prior to which he lived in Phila- 
delphia, Pa. where he drove armoured 



trucks there, and also in Miami, Served 
with the U. S. Navy 1920-1924 as Fireman 
1/C. Is a member of Little River Shuffle- 
board Club; and the North Miami Shuf- 
fleboard Club which he founded, and 
served as its founder President. Attends 
St. Mary's Catholic Church. 

HOWARD BARR-^Teller ... A native 
of Monroe, La., Howard attended local 
schools until the 9th grade, when he left 
school and joined the Armed Forces. 
Served 2 l / z years of his three year tour 
of duty with the 11th Airborne, Para- 
troop Division, U. S. Army, in Germany, 
as Corporal. After the service he re- 
turned home, completed his high school 
education and graduated this past June 
from North Miami Hi. Formerly worked 
at Bank of Dade County in various 
departments. 

HARRY LEONARD^Teller . . . Born in 
Barrington, N. J.; was previously with 
First Camden National Bank of New Jer- 
sey for about 4 years, and managed the 
Bookkeeping Dept. Went, to Cinnaminson 
Bank and Trust Co., in Riverton, N. J. 
and held the same position. Is married 
to Sandra, and is a Veteran of World 
War II, and the Korean conflict. Served 
as a M/Sgt in the Infantry. Harry, likes 
raising tropical fish, and collects rare 
coins. 

GEORGETTE PARKHURST— Teller . . 
Formerly with Mercantile National Bank 
for about 2 years, in New Accounts, Col- 
lection, Payroll and Teller. Georgette 
has a son George, 6. Was born in Detroit, 
Mich., attends St. Mary's Catholic 
Church; likes water skiing; and plays 
the piano. 

WALDRON SWENTZEL, JR.— Teller . . 
Originally from Yonkers, N. Y.; Wally 
attended University of Miami. Was for- 
merly with Bank of South Miami for 
about 2 years, and has completed AIB 
courses in Accounting I and II. Is mar- 
ried, has a daughter Sherri 5, and at- 
tends Holy Comforter Episcopal Church. 
Plays the piano, likes golf and bowling. 



Mef 




Based on average salaries, 
Coffee Breaks cost our bank 
over §15,000 each year. 







VELMA MAE BLEYER 



Deepest sympathy is extended 
to the family of Velma Mae 
Bleyer, who died Saturday, Aug- 
ust 26, 19G1, at , Taylors ville, 111. 
airs. Bleyer was interned at Tay- 
lorsville on Monday, August 28. 

Cause of death was due to an 
explosion created from lighting a 
defective stove, resulting In 
severe burns and internal in- 
juries. Present at the time of the 
fatal accident were Mrs. Bleyer's 
grandson, Keith 4, who accom- 
panied her to Taylorsville; and 
her mother, Mrs. Ida Robertson, 
whom she was visiting while on 
vacation. 

airs. Bleyer was born in St. 
Louis, Missouri, on March 13, 
19087 BefoW"coming 'to our bank 
as an Information Teller on June 
27, 1955; she was a PBX-Opcrator 
for the Pennsylvania RR, 1947- 
1950; and a Transit Department 
Clerk at Mercantile Trust Com- 
pany/ St. Louis, Mo., 1951-1955. 

Survivors include her husband 
Fred A. Bleyer; a daughter Pa- 
tricia; grandchildren Kevin 6, 
Keith 4, and Kelly 10 months, 
children of her daughter and son- 
in-law, Christopher Douffet; and 
her mother, Mrs. Robertson. 

Mrs. Bleyer was Treasurer of 
the Little River Business and 
Professional Women's Club ; Trus- 
tee, for Ladies' Auxiliary of the 
Eagles; a staff reporter for Bank 
Notes; a member of Miami Chap- 
ter, American Institute of Bank- 
ing; and a member* of "Check- 
mates." 



(Continued from Page 4) 
, . . ^Departmental Cnange Barbara Lo- 
vett has been transferred from Book- 
keeping to Analysis v v = "Jimmie" Took- 
er transferred from an 'told" home to a, 
spanking-brand-new-one in Hialeah . . -. 
It's good to know Jo Ann's husband, John 
Fuscoe is out of the hospital; likewise 
for Joan Cherry who had quite a time - 
. . . Vacation Data included some" "Is- 
land Hopping" for Angela and "Red" 
Burke . - . destination Cleveland, for 
Martha Ramey to view newly acquired 
granddaughter Karen Lynn, daughter of 
Betty and George Ramey ... A visit to 
Aunt Cora Thigpen in Tallahassee for 
Maxine Scroggs . . . South Portlnad, Me. 
for a visit with, mother, Mrs. Harold 
Bliss, for Lucile Petrie, plus seeing her 
sister (first time in 10 years) Mrs. Bar- 
bara Twothaker, in Boston . . . Dorothy 
Sweeney entertained Sophie Barechi dur- 
ing her stay at an M.B, Hotel plus local 
sight-seeing trips . . . and it took "two 
starts" to complete the journey to Cham- 
pagne, 111. for Lorraine Aufford, daugh- 
ter Laurl, and grandmother Mrs. Ira 
Babb, to visit family and friends . . - 
North Carolina beckoned to Betty and 
Lee Hamilton and son Jimmy . . . De- 
lighted with their new apartment on the 
Bay. are "Sandy" and John Spiess . . . 
ditto about their new blue Chevrolet, are 
Margaret and George Addison v . . Betty 
Rogers was mighty happy to become an 
Aunt to recently arrived Cynthia Ruth 
(born on the Anniversary day of our 
bank) . . , And "dog-gone" if that "Jet" 
Peet doesn't make his human, Alice, 
proud of him. He literally walks off with 
Trophies and Blue Ribbons and is a 
dynamo of mischief and energy to Alice's 
wholehearted delight , . . A .LB. Bowling 
Season is on with our "Delinquents" 
ready for a good year. Mae Teubner, is 
"Captain" of teammates Virginia As- 
bury, Harry Leonard, Gale West and 
Gerry Blanchctte . . . Congratulations 
to Director, Urban R. Kokenge, who fin- 
ally caught a sailfish after trying for 30 
years, as reported on the Kirby Brooks 
Show . . . And goodness— but there have 
been some silly things happening, like 
"Eddye" White's husband Clark, having 
to get up at 3 ayem to saw the rungs of 
a chair, so fat and howling "Fritzle" 
(Continued on Page 11) 



10 



special nressflec 

by BERNARD E. BOLDIN 
Vibe President 

The greatest need in support of the 
national and local economy is bank as- 
sistance to small business concerns; 
however, banks can only provide short 
term financing for deserving customers 
leaving them faced with a real difficulty 
in obtaining long-term loans and equity 
capital required for adequate growth 
and developments. This fact has long 
been recognized by both the United 
States Government and many State Gov- 
ernments who have enacted legislation 
to assist small business concerns. Flori- 
da, during its last legislative session, 
enacted an act providing for the organi- 
zation of industrial development corpora- 
tions. 

When a development corporation is 
formed and licensed to act, it will ob- 
tain loans from com- 
mercial banks, sav- 
ings" banks, industrial 
savings banks, feder- 
al savings and loan 
associations, insur- 
ance companies, etc., 
and in turn reloan 
such funds to pro- 
mote, stimulate, de- 
velop and advance 
the business prosper- 
ity, and economic wel- 
fare of Florida and its citizens through 
rehabilitation of existing business and 
industry and in the location of new busi- 
ness and industry, all of which will 
create new jobs, new depositors for 
banks and stimulate all trade. 

Our government has recently conducted 
a series of field projects, concentrated 
on small business manufacturers with 50 
to 250 employees and non-manufacturing 
companies with a net worth of $20,000 
to §200,000 and consistently encountered 
a basic lack of training. For example, 
39% of managers, 35% of full time book- 
keepers, and 60% of part time bookkeep- 
ers, had never had any courses in ac- 
counting or finance. Nor was this lack 
of formal training compensated for by 
understanding gained informally-. 

These facts- bear out the experience 




BOLDIN 



by banks in interviewing many small 
businessmen who are seekers of credit. 
Many do not use their financial state- 
ments, usually prepared by an outside 
accountant, to guide them in financial 
management. Rather, they consider them 
necessary evils, produced solely to satis- 
fy government regulations and creditor's 
requests. 

It's really appalling the number of 
businessmen who, when asked for ex- 
planations about certain items in their 
financial statements admit that they do 
not know anything about a financial 
statement, and request that we call their 
accountant Inside their own businesses, 
managers of small companies seem hob-- 
bled by their lack of accounting sophisti- 
cation. Accounting ignorance costs, many 
small companies money, moreover, man- 
agers fail to obtain financial manage- 
ment advice from outside sources * avail- 
able to him— from his bank, trade asso-^ 
ciations, accountant, or the government.. 

To the extent feasable we endeavor to 
help the small businessman to help him- 
self and to survive not only when we 
have an expanding economy, but during 
recessions as well. 



(Continued from Page 10) 
the Dachshund could be freed ! ! ! . . . and 
Dolores Cordova sitting down and miss- 
ing her chair* (no injuries)!!! . . . and 
Eleanor Arentshorst's embarrassing di- 
lemma. First she locked her husband 
out of their home~then succeeded in* 
locking herself out-^and while the oblig- 
ing next door neighbor tried his keys in 
the door, to see if they would possibly 
work— her husband arrived, and she 
found herself with a lot of explaining to 
do!!! Next, please! 

(Continued from Page 8) 
can greatlyjncrease her value to her institu*. 
tion* It has been said that *he who speaks 
two languages is as important as two people. 9 
Surely by using the same kind of reasoning, 
the versatile bank employee will enhance 
her usefulness in direct proportion to the 
many facets of the bank business with which 
she becomes familiar" 

Whether Miss Harper realizes it or not, 
she has lived up to her own precepts— - 
and is a * credit to her beliefs— as evi- 
denced by the success she now enjoys. 



11 




You know— I've been hearing a lot these clays (and who hasn't) about the evils of 
Communism, and about how the Reds have a lot of big plans for us all to their own 
benefit, of course. And I'd find myself getting angry and thinking 'that's a fine state of 
affairs , . , why don't THEY do something about it!' That is, until I realized that THEY 
meant ME . . . YOU and I ... US I A bit startling, isn't it, to know that: the threat _of_ 
Communism is not the problem of some nebulous group of THEYS who exist in some 
distant place-but OURS-TODAY and NOW! 

With that established, the question arises what can we do about this. Perhaps the 
first thing is to clarify what it is we are up against— Communism; and what we fully 
intend to, preserve— Democracy. 

Communism^is a theory of system of social organization based on the holding of 
property in common, actual ownership being ascribed to the community as a whole or 
to the state. A system in which all economic activity is conducted by a totalitarian stale, 
dominated by a single and self-perpetuating political party. 

Democracy ^— is a government by the people; a form of government in which the 
supreme power is vested in the people and exercised by them or by their elected 
agents under a free electoral system. 

Because our government is a Democracy we have the privilege of Capitalism, a 
system under which the means of production, distribution, and exchange are in large 
measure privately owned and directed. 

It is obvious that Russia wishes to destroy our Democracy and annihilate Capital- 
ism so that a- Totalitarian state can flourish and dominate our future. And what a dis- 
mal future it would be. 

For that reason, your magazine has become an instrument for the purpose of enlight- 
ening and reminding all of us of the privileges and benefits we enjoy in these United 
States of America, our right to worship . . . our principles , ■ , our freedom. Compare 
this to the Wal destruction of man as an individual,, and the suppressing of his stand- 
ards of decency ■ ■ . as expe rienced today by those forced to live, under a Soviet regime. 

To further our cause, a recent Board meeting of the South Florida Industrial Editors 
Association was held, in which it was decided to promote this idea and ask ALL Indus- 
trial Editors to devote a section of their publication to this purpose, so that it will be 
extended into thousands of homes, right here in Miami. It is possible, too, that this can 
be perpetuated "On a national and international scale, thereby reaching untold numbers 
on a common level of understanding. 

Imagine . . . what Khrushchev would give . . . to have 
a medium of communication as penetrating and as intimate 
as these house organs— for getting to us! IlSl^tinX 




aO* 



35 y t 



ear J ©F Pr^iiii^J.'flfl 
©UTSEfiETBirj© SBBVIGS 



J 




ANK. 
NOT 



♦ ♦ 




\W 




/Vauemteb f96f 



Our Pilgrim Fathers 
Freedom sought 
On Plymouth's 

rockbound soil 
Their freedom was so 
^^ dearly bought 
With blood, and sweat, 

and toil 
So that today we too, 

are free 
To worship and give 
if banks to Thee 
OLord. 













lV„. 



LITTLE RIVER BANK and TRUST COMPANY 

8017 NORTHEAST 2nd AVENUE 
MIAMI. FLORIDA 



■ ■ ■ 



BANK 
NOTES 




Vol. 4 



No. 6 



. . . Dedicated to Progress . . . Through 
Mutual Understanding and Apprecia- 
tion for each other. 

ADVISORY BOARD 

DANIEL C. NORTHROP 
Vice President 

EDWIN M. GRAHAM 
Vice President 

* * # » 

EDITOR 

LYNN D. BROWNE 

• * * * 

STAFF 

Lorraine Aufford 

Inez Fasig 
Judith Kaufmann 
Mae Teubner 
. ' Dorothy Wallace 



A 



siiea 





Member South Florida Industrial Editors Association 

Southern Council Editors Association 

International Council of Industrial Editors 



- CooLteints 

Our Pilgrim Fathers Front Cover 
About the Cover t^*^****,..*. . _2 

Feature Story ,„,.— <*,..«.*,» 3 

Have You Heard .**,..**,*,«*„,.,.... 4 .,j 

Man Behind The Title ..^...'. 4-5 

Teams We Sponsor **..* 6-7 

Christmas Party ...,. .„..,..,..>» 6 

The Welcome Mat ..„„..>.*,.>..,.,., 8 
Happy Birthday To You .„ 9 i 

I 

What's In It For Us! .^...*„-...„ 9 
Special Message ,...<* ..~~ 11 11 

''J 

Personally Speaking....>»Back Cover 

ABOUT THE COVER • • • 

Gerry Shwetzer has lots to tell 
about her work, as well as her 
personal life. Read her story start- 
ing on page 3. 



foatifamf, " S&%& (^entity Sfavetfeti 



One of the most important and neces- 
sary attributes of a Trust Department 
secretary, is that she view her job as 
being highly confidential— in addition to 
being skilled in the mechanics necessary 
for efficient operation. 

Personification of these characteristics 
is Gerda (Gerry) Shwetzer, secretary 
to William Baraket, Trust Officer. Gerry 
sits at the front desk as one enters the 
Trust Department, and in addition to 
her numerous duties greets bur cus- 
tomers and directs them to the proper 
officer who in, turn, takes care of their 
needs. 

When asked what she considered 
necessary qualifications for a position 
such as hers Gerry replied, "A legal 
background is very necessary,, plus a 
knowledge of Commercial Banking. In 
addition, one must have the ability to 
understand the legal viewpoint, and cope 
intelligently with the many facets of a 
Trust Department." 

Gerry went on to explain that, "al- 
though decisions, are made by the Trust 
Officer, his secretary must be able to 
work with him and have a thorough 
understanding of Trust procedure. Fami- 
liarity with legal terminology is a great 
help to a Trust secretary, as well as the 
ability to^be *able to do her own corre- 
spondence if* necessary. This does not 
encompass the facts or aspects of a 
case, which are of course, determined 
by the* Trust Officer and the circum- 
stances involved." 

Our Trust Department is under the 

'guidance and supervision of Richard C. 

Boggs, Executive Vice President and 

Trust Officer, Lucile Petrie, is his 

secretary. 

In addition to Gerry and Mr. Baraket, 
there are Douglas R. Bell, Trust Officer; 
Dick Swan, Administrative Assistant to 
Mr. Bell, and Sandra Spiess, Secretary; 
Louis V. Bartlett, Assistant Trust Offi- 
cer, with Dorothy Wallace as his secre- 
tary*. JTrust^Accounting includes Forrest 
Nielsen, Supervisor; Robert Stewart, and 
Maxine Scroggs. 

It is interesting to note that as of our 
June 30, 1961 Statement of Condition, 
Trust Resources were in excess of 
$20,000,000.00. This is a distinct progres- 
sion from the early days when our Trust 
Department consisted of one officer, and 
one secretary. 

The operation of a Trust Department 
encompasses many facets dealing with 
Estates, '" Guardianships, Testamentary 



and Living Trusts, Agency and Custodian 
Accounts, and Escrow Accounts, to name 
just a few that are included in Gerry's 
duties, under the supervision of Mr. 
Baraket 

To thoroughly explain each type of 
account handled in our Trust Depart- 
ment would necessitate a great deal of 
detail. Briefly, Estates . . . adminis- 
tered by the bank which has been named 
in the WilPof the decedent as Executor,, 
or appointed by the Court where there 
isn't any Will, both under jurisdiction 
of the Court. Guardianship . . . whereby 
the bank is appointed by the court as 
guardian of the property and manages 
such to the best advantage of the ward. 
Testamentary Trusts under a Will and 
Living Trusts set up while the donor is 
alive . . . also Pension, Profit Sharing, 
Insurance, etcetera. In the event of a 
Trust under a Will, the bank is named 
Trustee. The Circuit Court appoints the 
bank to manage the property, securities, 
etcetera for the beneficiaries. Agency 
and Custodian Accounts . . . Agency, is 
where the, bank acts as an agent for the 
principle who creates the agency account 
and provides management of the account 
including periodic investment reviews. 
In a Custodian account, the bank acts 
in a safekeeping capacity. Escrow Ac- 
counts ! . . The bank acts as Agent for 
two or more parties for a certain period 
of time and holds funds or property in 
Escrow, and distributes funds or prop- 
erty to the parties involved according 
to the terms of the Escrow agreement. 

To keep our Trust Department working 
smoothly and according to schedule, a 
Tickler Card" System is used which is a 
reminder for each one in the depart- 
ment of duties to be performed daily 
through annually, and even in the more 
distant future. 

Gerry explained that her duties in- 
clude Stock Transfers, which are a de- 
tailed and time consuming operation; 
and familiarity with the stock market 
and stock brokers idiom and techniques. 
This is of-value in correspondence and 
in working with Mr. Baraket, who eval- 
uates and analyzes stocks and bonds for 
Trust Accounts and is responsible for 
the accounting of the Bond Portfolio of 
the bank. She also types the weekly 
Trust Committee Minutes, keeps the 
official register of accounts, and com- 
putes fees which are checked by Mr. 
Baraket. 

"Tax season," said Gerry, "is heavy. 
In addition to our regular chores we 
(Continued, on Page 8) 



# • # 

. . . tHat we have quite a group taking 
A.I.B. courses. Ambitious co-workers are 
Howard Barr, Mayson RIouin, Sally 
-Broe,. Yolanda, Cap polin o, Dolores Cor-, 
dova, William Duncan (AT), James 
Fagan (Asst. Secty,)? Betty Hamilton, 
Earl Helfman, Alice Henderson, Judith 
KaufmaniK Barbara Lovett, Lawrence 
Lynch (AT), Anne MacNulty, Pauline 
McEIhaney,-- Sandra Pfeiffer, Cecelia 
Rose, Helen Snyder, John Stewart, Agnes 
Uvino, and Dorothy Wallace . . . Very 
proud are the Douglas Bells* (TO) of son 
alike, who is President of his 8th grade 
at Parkway Jr. Hi . . , Pur-r-r-fect is 
the word for the Jaguar, Gerry and 
Emil Shwetzer recently acquired . . . 
and that's a "Rare Vintage" '47 Caddy 
Earl Helfman OWNS , . . Vacation 
Items— Elsie Wear visited family and 
friends in Germantown; Pa. . . . the 
George Bourbeaus' (AT) relaxed 'n 
fished at Jensen Beach . . . N.H. was 
the destination of Lou and Winifred Lus- 
sier . , ., and hunting in N.Y.. State lured 
Howard Rehm . . . the Ray Morlocks' 
(Sr. VP) journeyed to N.C. where they 
rode a Tweetzee RR (a tweetzee rail- 
road?) . . . and Kate Nelson just stayed 
home. Her daughter Dale is skedded for 
another piano concert on the 19th . . - 
Lynn Leonard's diamond is from her 
Bob . . . and that's Milton, who "com- 
mutes" from Pa. to woo Betty Rogers . . . 
'Twas "love" at first sight when Dan 
Northrop (VP).saw wee "Debbie" darling 
of the four-pawed set . . . Congratulations 
to Helen arid Biii Snyder who recently ob- 
served their 26th Wedding Anniversary, 
with sons Dallas and Larry . . , "Mother- 
in-Law" status reached by staffer Lor- 
raine Aufford, whose daughter Sandra 
wed Edward Bunn, at Central Baptist 
Church . . . Francis Wigfall's daughters 
sure get to go a fur piece. Dorothea went 
on a business trip to Brazil, and Alice 
Marie vacationed in Spain where she 
visited sister Frances, wife of Comman- 
der Joseph F. Kelly of Rota Naval Air 

* (Continued on Page 7) 



*-\\ft 






'( 



An aura of youthfulness' that promises 
to be of an enduring quality;, plus a • 
warm infectious grin^is^indicative of 
the pleasing personality of JackvHinger- 
ton, Assistant Treasurer. . 

Mr. Hingerton was«bornMn-Gastleford, 
England, When he was**about v *five* years 
of age, his parents-left ~England l \for 
Canada, where they settled 'in Regina, 
Saskatchewan. But one rugged Canadian 
winter was enough for the Senior Hin- 
gerton's. They left Canada~and moved, 
to Queens, a borough of*New-*York City, | 

where Mr. Hingerton^spenUavconsider- j 

able portion of his-Jife % :there>*and in 
Lindenhurst, Long Island. *■ * * 

His banking career**started^atr the 
early age of 14, in July71929 at Chase 
National Bank of New York, (now Chase i 

Manhattan Bank of New'TTork) ... as | 

an office boy and messenger, 

"At that time" Mr, Jlingertonr stated, j 

"we had to attend lectures*several times 
a week! Before banking^hours^ Officers 
would speak on various~depakment*func- 
tions, and we of course, had to attend. 
These discussions were 'highly^ educa- 

tional and aided greatly "in* 'Helping us *< 

understand many aspects of the banking *,, 

field." *( 

After spending about five -years as ;j 

office boy and messenger; Mr.- Hingerton 
was transferred to the Foreign .Depart- 
ment. He worked in the^Bookkeeping 
section- of that department** for about 
three years, until he changed *'jobs for a 
better paying position with Bank of 
Manhattan. 

Beginning on the night shift in the 
Block Department, Mr. Hingerton stayed 
on until 1944, at which time he left the 
banking field for Liberty Aircraft Prod- 
ucts, a defense plant. 

He remained at LAP until he entered 
the U. S. Air Force in 1945. Based at 



. . Jack Hingerton 



ASSISTANT TREASURER 




Shepherd Field, Texas, his banking ex- 
perience was a determining factor in 
his transfer to the Finance Department 
at Jefferson Barracks, in St. Louis, Mo. 
Mr. Hingerton brought to light an inter- 
esting fact about Jefferson Barracks, 
when he remarked that "it was one of 
the oldest Forts and Camps in the United 
States, dating back to historical signffi- 
gance as established by landmarks and 
statues of heroes of a bygone era. "Un- 
fortunately" he continued, "it is no 
longer in existence. I believe it was 
divided for Real Estate purposes, and 
that about the only thing that does re- 
main, is the V.A. Hospital." 

Transferred again, this time to Special 
Services, he remained there until his 
honorable discharge in 1946, with the 
rank of Corporal. 

Mr. Hingerton promptly returned to 
the banking field during the summer of 
1946, in the Bookkeeping Department of 
Clinton Trust Company, -New York City. 
He spent three years in that department, 
became a Teller, and after two years 




Cpl. Jack Hingerton World War II 



was promoted to the position of Head 
Teller, 

During these years he had vacationed 
in Miami, visiting with his married sis- 
ter, Hilda. He liked Miami and event- 
ually decided to make his home here. 
Mr. Hingerton's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Hingerton also decided to live here, 
and now reside in Hialeah. 

On June 22, 1953, Mr. Hingerton en- 
tered our bank as Head Teller. Six 
months later he was put in charge of 
the Tellers, and on January 1, 1954 re- 
ceived official recognition through his 
title Manager, Telter Department While 
Mr. Hingerton was responsible for a 
smooth running operation, all major de- 
cisions regarding tellers were determined 
by the senior officer to whom he re- 
ported at that time. 

In July of 1956, Mr. Hingerton was 
elected to the position of Assistant Treas- 
urer, and moved from the Head Teller's 
cage, to a front desk in our lobby. 

In addition to being in charge of the 
Tellers, Mr, Hingerton is reponsible for 
our Cafeteria, Teller Monthly Volume 
Reports, and servicing our customers in 
the New Accounts Department. 

Mr.. Hingerton and his wife Glenna, 
recently moved into a new home, com-- 
plete with swimming pool, situated in 
Miramar. The Hingerton's have three 
sons Jack, Gary Lee, and Kevin Dale. 
A member of the Lutheran Church, Mr. 
Hingerton is also a member of Miami 
Shores Men's Club, American Institute 
of Banking, and Harvey Seeds Post, 
American Legion. His outride interests 
are for the present, concentrated on his 
new home. 



3 



ecimd 



U 




(fthrtsimaa $arttf 

* * * 

It's not too soon to start planning for our annual Christmas party. Edwin M. 
Graham, Vice President and Albert J. Sokoll, Assistant Vice President, are in charge 
of the Dinner Dance which will be held Saturday, December 16, 1961 at Miami 
Shores Country Club. 

Cocktails will be served at 6:30, followed by dinner at 8:00 p.m. Dancing will 
start at 9. Dress is informal. 

Each co-worker may bring one guest. In the event you attend alone, your guest 
privilege is NOT transferable. 

6 



1 



Although banking is a recognized serious business that imposes high moral obliga- 
tions and definite responslbllkfes, It has it's "human" side too. This is realized in many 
instances through the memberships of our officers in clubs and organizations. As mem- 
bers of various groups, they in turn contribute their time and efforts to countless worthy 
causes such as helping the underprivileged, giving scholarships to outstanding students, 
and keeping youngsters healthfully occupied in an effort to reduce juvenile delinquency. 
Not generally realized, is the fact that our bank sponsors three bowling teams, and 
a baseball team. The duties of sponsorship include bowling fees, sanction fees, bowling 
shirts, baseball uniforms and equip- 
ment, as necessary- 
Two of the bowling teams are 
the Juniors and Bantams which play 
in the Lions Club league. These 
teams were brought to our attention 
by Cadwalader Woodville, Jr., Vice 
President and Secretary; an active 
member and a past-President of 
Little River Lions Club. The boys 
bowl every Saturday morning at 
Bowlerama under supervision of 
Lions Club members. 

For the past two years the Juniors 
have won a second place trophy, both 
of which are displayed in our Board 
Room. The Lions are firm believers 
in the theory that supervised healthy Richar fl Execu tive Vice Pres. and 

activity, aids greatly in reducing Trust off|cer right> acccpts bowl|ng trophy 
juvenile delinquency. {rom cadwalader Woodville, Jr., Vice Pres. 

Our adult team, the ' Delinquents ' an a Secretary; won for our bank by the Junior 
(no pun intended) is part of the Boys Lions Team. 



'e *3i> 



wondof* 



American Institute of Banking Bowling League, and is comprised of co-workers. The 
"Delinquents" bowl every Wednesday nite at Hialeah Lanes. Although they haven't 
won any trophies, they held second place last season, which is very good considering the 
keen competition. 

, Our Pony League Baseball Team which was brought to our attention through the 
efforts of Edwin M. Graham, Vice President; is the Miami Shores-Little River Bank and 
Trust Company team. It too, is under strict supervision which it receives from the staff 
of the Miami Shores Recreation Department. Latest progress report on the PLT 

shows they were in the playoff for 
the 19,60-1961 season. 

Sponsorship of a team, is, a good 
thing/ Being a member of a team 
teaches the youngsters the rules of 
the game, the value of competition, 
and the ideals of high standards of 
true sportsmanship. It gives them a 
healthy interest at an important 
time of their life — l when they are 
old enough to reason and young 
enough to be molded. It teaches 
them many values that will help to 
give them a sound basis of judgment 
and perspective for tomorrow's 
problems. 

WeVe proud of the efforts of these 
youngsters who represent our bank 
in the field of sports today — and 
who may well be our depositors of 
tomorrow. 




Our "Delinquents" . . . "Captain" Mae Tcub- 
ner, left, Gale West, Virginia Asbury. Standing 
left, Gerry -Blanchette, Harry Lenard. You are 
invited to watch them bowl. 



(Continued from Page 4) 
Base in Cadiz . . . Church Convention at 
Lake Wales was enjoyed by Willie and 
Martha Nicholson. Martha was a dele- 
gate from St- James A.M;E, Church . . K 
Walter and Mabel Donahue recently vis- 
ited Nassau, as did Rosemary O'Rourke 
. . . Back from Chi this year's setting 
for annual "Orange Bowl Junket" is 
Edwin Graham (VP) . . . Harriet Guise 
misses son Don, who at Navy Boot 
Camp is just starting his 4 years en- 
listment . . . as does Lucile Petrie, who 
thinks often of son Harold in Germany 



. . . Departmental Changes Include— 
Mary Donnelly from Check Imprinting 
to Auditing . . . Sally Broe from B'keep. 
to Check Imprinting ., . . Georgette Park- 
hurst from Collections to Loans . . - 
Ernie Azula from Loans to Collections 
(sheesh!) . M . and Bob Stewart from 
Teller to Trust,. , . Welcome back to 
"Jackie" Cravero at Information—and 
Hi! to P/T Co-Worker Arthur Oliver . . . 
Recoveries we cheer! Jo Snyder's seri- 
ous fall at a motel pool . . . Return of 
Ray, husband of Isabelle Van Doren 
(Continued on Page 9) 



THE WELCOME MAT 



DORINE HEBERT— Block . . , Former- 
ly of Flint, Mich,, where she worked at 
Genesee Merchants Bank and Trust Co., 
in the Proof Dept. Also worked at Peo- 
-Pjes Bank in i ^ L^elan^Fla. Dorine is„a 
member of Assembly of God, and helps 
out at the Cuban Refugee Center, Likes 
sewing, painting, music and sports. 

CAROLYN SHIELDS— Bookkeeping . . . 
Borne in Miami, Carolyn js a -graduate 
of Miami Edison High School where she= 
was a Cadet. Formerly in the Bookkeep- 
ing Dept. at Northshore Bank. Has two 
children, Donald 4, Kathy 1. Attends 
Lakeview Methodist Church where she 
is a circle chairman in Woman's Society 
of Christian Service. Hobby is the piano, 
for which she is taking lessons. 

ROBERT FORBES— Teller B , , Former- 
ly from New York State. Worked in 
Washington, D r C at McLaughlin Bank- 
ing Corp. and at American Security and 
Trust, as a Teller. Bob has taken several 
A.LB. courses, plus a Credit Course at 
American University in Washington, 
D.C., while with the Federal Credit Un- 
ion, Justice Department. Likes water 
sports, and horseback riding. 



LILLIAN FRIEDRICK— Bookkeeping . ... 
Before coming to our bank worked as 
a Bookkeeper in Buffalo, N. Y. Has two 
children, Brian 17, and Karen 13- 
JLillian_attends Radar M emor ial Metho- 
dist Church; and makes her own clothes. 

IRENE RENN— Loan . . - Born in Miami 
Beach, is a graduate of Miami Edison 
High School where she was a Majorette. 
Formerly with American .National. Bank 
in the Loan Dept; and* also. worked for 
a local finance company. Attends St. 
Mary's Catholic Church. Irene's hobby 
is caring for her horse, ".Black Devil," 
who stays at the Triple A Ranch. An 
avid horsewoman, she recently com- 
peted for and won, the Championship 
Ribbon for Showmanship, at Hialeah 
Gardens. 

LITA GANTZ— Teller . . - Came to Mi- 
ami from Philadelphia, Pa. Was pre- 
viously employed at Commercial Bank. 
Lita, an accomplished organist, is a 
member of the Hammond Organ So- 
ciety, owns a Hammond, and has played 
for Fashion Shows and at the Castaways, 
Miami Beach. Attends Immaculate Con- 
ception Catholic Church; likes gardening. 



(Continued from Page 3) 
prepare Tax Returns for our customers." 
There is however a very human side to 
Trust which appeals to her as she 
stresses the "drama" of many situations. 
There is the "seriousness" of witnessing 
a Will, and the mixed emotions which 
are at times displayed as a result of 
various situations and discussions, all 
of which brings out in Gerry a very 
warm and sincere desire to be of assist* 
ance. To her, it is "a very important 
phase of Public Relations — how you re- 
ceive a customer, attend him, and serve 
him." 

Perhaps this warm-heartedness and 
understanding stems from her own per- 
(Continued on Page 10) 



APOLOGIES . . . 
. « . to George S. Ness, Vice Presi- 
dent and Comptroller; and Daniel 
C. Northrop, Vice President Mr. 
Ness and Mr. Northrop, who have 
been with our bank since 1950 and 
1935 respectively, were not men- 
tioned in the "Our 35th Anniver- 
sary" story, in the September issue. 
Your Editor regrets the omission- 



cJfafihxj JzsLxthciau to ^Uoul 



( 






DECEMBER 

Clifford Locke-^Auditing „„«. ,„„„„, 3 

Josephine Snyder— Teller m „-. iiw „„.„^ 3 

Dorothy Morris^Floater .,.„„ v ..„„, 4 

Howard Rehm— Teller ,«, ,...„„,... ,„ wo , 5 

James V. Fagan^Assistant Secretary 7 

Gladys Haldy— Cafeteria ,„, „, ..„ ^ 14 

Dorothy Madsen— 
Secretary to Mr. Garner „ 

Olga Burgos^Teller , Jfl ,^ (< 

Robert Forbes—Teller ^ „„ v , „, 

Jacqueline Cravero— Information 



■•*rn*\in%n 



17 
18 
22 

26 



JANUARY 

George S. Ness — 
Vice President and Comptroller *..,. 1 

Jack Hingerton-~Assistant Treasurer 2 



J *****-**»*< 



William J, Mooney~Auditor 

Hazel Aaron^Block „„„ 

Rosemary O'Rourke— 
New Accounts Secretary ..„ 

Lillian Friedrick— Bookkeeping 

Louis Lussier— Teller >, , „„ M ..„. VJ 

Bobbi Sutton-^-Block 

Mary DePrimo^Block «„...„,„, 

Maribel Neville— Information „ 

Mary Gentile— Bookkeeping .,., 

Charlie Boswell— Janitor ..„„„„ 

George W. Bourbeau— 
Assistant Treasurer „„> M ^ m . 

Agnes Uvino~Analysis ,.,♦, „„ 

Kate Nelson— Bookkeeping A ,^. 

Albert J. SokolW 
Assistant Vice President 



jri*-*ir*«t*4*r.«i 



8 
12 

13 
18 
18 
20 
21 
21 
22 
23 



.... 23 

,,, 24 






25 



i'VU>nt**( 



.31 




T&dat't to it fan. Hi? 




Approximately 6 paid Legal 
Holidays, benefit us by more 
than $10,000 per year. 



(Continued from Page 7) 
from the hospital A . . likewise for Lory, 
daughter of Yolie Cappolino . . . S-a-y 
wasn't that a terrific 207 Harry Lenard 
bowled? ,, . . Thrilled was Maribel 
Neville over son Tom's pix in the PM 
Daily's Sports Column about his starting 
guard post on the Pioneer's Team . , . 
And Thanks to Katharine Evers, Gladys 
Haldy and Vivian La Porte for the Won- 
derful Turkey Dinner . . . Happy Holiday 
y'all!! 



(Continued from Page 8) 
sonal background, which at one time 
undoubtedly needed, and appreciated, 
these traits in others. 

Born in Berlin, Gerry went thru World 
War II, in Germany. She was educated 
at Lyzeum, where she remained until 
she was 16 years of age. Comparable 
to a Junior College, her years at Lyzeum 
were followed by two years at a busi- 
ness college where she learned short- 
hand in English, (it being mandatory 
to learn English in the lower grades.) 

For a while Gerry worked at odd jobs, 
but in 1946 she took a refresher course 
at a secretarial ^.^ 
school sponsored piT 
by the American 
Occupation 
Forces, in Ber- 
lin. Emerging as 
an honor student, 
and as a result 
of her bi-Hngual 
talents, she was 
hired immediate- 
ly following grad- 
uation exercises 
by her "first 
American boss," 
the Indigenous 
Personnel Staff 
Officer in charge 
of all German in- 
digenous person- 
nel, employed by 
American Offices 
and Installations 
under OMGUS 
(Office of the 
Military Govern- 
ment for Ger- 
many, United 
States) 




, No, your eyes do not deceive you! it is Gregory 
in x,eeeir.»er o* p eck p ; cture a wn ' h 0Hr Gerry Shwetzer, hi Germany. 
1947, she applied G was hHer p reter j or Mr. Peck. 
for a job in the ' 

Western Zone of Germany and trans- 
ferred from OMGUS in Berlin, to the 
Bipartite Control Office in Frankfurt. 
She subsequently became secretary to 
the officer in charge of Management and 
Budget, within the offices of General 
Clay, and General Adeoek. 

When the Bipartite Control Office was 
dissolved, the office of the United States 
High Commissioner for Germany was 
established under a Mr. McCloy, who 
was at that time High Commissioner 
for Germany. Gerry transferred in Octo- 
ber 1949, to the office of General Coun- 
sel, and was assigned as Secretary to 
the Deputy Chief, Legislation Division. 
The year 1950 was one of change for 
Germany, and a turn for the better for 
Gerry. Governmental duties were grad- 
ually fed back to the Germans. Gerry 
quit her job as Secretary to the Deputy 
Chief, and answered a news ad which 



resulted in her being chosen out of 200 
applicants, for testing. The outcome was 
a position as secretary to the American 
Managing Director of the German Affi- 
liate of 20th Century Fox Film Company, 
with headquarters in Frankfurt, and 
branch offices in Berlin, Hamburg, 
Dusseldorf, Munich, and Frankfurt. 

It was in this position as interpreter, 
that Gerry came in contact with many 
German as well as American film nota- 
bles, and accompanied them to functions 
and appearances as called for in their 
itinerary. Among those she was closely 
associated with were Gregory Peck, the 

iate Tyrone 
Power, Hilde- 
garde Neff, and 
Spyros Skouras. 
Of Gregory Peck, 
she has nothing 
but praise saying, 
"He is such a 
gentle and courte- 
ous person/' 
_ Then she met 
E m i 1 Shwetzer 
who with the Oc- 
cupation Forces 
was stationed 
near Frankfurt, 
as Program Di- 
rector of AF Net- 
work in Europe. 
In December of 
1953, Gerry be- 
came Mrs. Emil 
Shwetzer, resign- 
ed her "glamour 
job," and came 
to the United 
States, in July 
1954. 

New York City 
was "headquar- 
ters" where she 
worked as a bi- 
linquai secretary for a law firm on 
Broad Street. After about two years, she 
returned to the film industry with Allied 
Artists, in Times Square. Here she was 
secretary to the European Distributor 
in the States, and was mainly concerned 
with the translation of contracts. 

In 1957, Gerry and her husband came 
to Miami. For a short time she worked 
as a bilinqual secretary for a downtown 
firm, before beginning at our bank on 
July 29, 1957. 

In reviewing her varied positions as 
against her present one in banking, 
Gerry is really quite happy in this field 
as established by her statement, "Al- 
though banking differs from that which 
I have done, I feel that my wprk in the 
Trust Department is personally gratify- 
ing, because of the human relationship 
which makes it a warm and diversified 
career." 



10 



SPECIAL mESSflGE 

by DOUGLAS R. BELL 
Trust Officer 

Trust business is good. Your Trust 
Department is meeting the needs of 
more customers with a wider variety 
of services than ever before. Total Trust 
assets under our care exceed $21,000,000 
and are growing daily. Wills now filed 
with us naming the Bank in a Fiduciary 
capacity, have an estimated value of 
$92,712,000. 

We are optimistic about tho future but 
not to the extent that we have become 
complacent. New business Is the life* 
blood of our growth, and intelligent en- 
thusiastic promotion is the backbone of 
an effective new business effort. It is 
axiomatic that the most effective promo- 
tion comes from good public relations 
and the old fashioned virtues of courtesy, 
honesty and efficiency; but wlio*. shall 
know the variety and 
quality of our activi- 
ties unless we our- 
selves proclaim their 
worth. 

Ours is a unique 
business about which K 
the public knows lit- j 
tie or nothing. It is \ 
our responsibility to *-- 
promote wider recog-j 
nition and approval 
of the services which 
we offer. 

The education of the public is an 
enormous and continuing task with pro- 
crastination and the natural disinclina- 
tion to think of death, adding to the 
problem. It is at this point we wish to 
place the emphasis of this "message." 
We earnestly and sincerely solicit the 
cooperation and assistance of the entire 
Bank staff in the development and ex- 
pansion of your Trust Department. Let 
us stress that it is YOUR .Trust 
Department. 

We recognize the fact that the nature 
of Trust business, makes it somewhat 
remote and secretive. As Bankers you 
are all familiar with the' extremely per- 
sonal and private financial aspects of 
your customer's lives. Trust work is 
further, complicated -by the addition. ,of 
emotions, loves, hates, ambitions and 
fears. It becomes evident then, that 
when dealing with such volatile emo- 
tional factors, that an atmosphere of 
quiet security and assurance prevail. 
Thus the requisites of the business .are 
the very^ things which "mislead many 
pebplelinto feeling that Trust work is 
mysterious and withdrawn. 

Actually, within the framework of the 
laws set down by the State and Federal 
Governments, the operation of Estates, 




BELL 



Trusts, Escrows and the like, are very 
logical businesslike processes, extremely 
diverse and interesting by reason of their 
being the product of extremely varied 
and interesting people. 

First, let us erase the impression that 
Trust work deals exclusively with the 
contemplation of death. Admittedly, the 
planning and administration of Estates 
is a major function as evidenced by our 
backlog of nearly $100,000,000 in, Wills, 
under which the Bank will serve. How- 
ever, one must bear in mind that even 
an Estate Plan and Will have living mo- 
tives, in that they are extensions of the 
good business practices and procedures 
which we all try to follow in our daily 
living. 

To further illustrate the living func- 
tions of your Trust Department let us 
cite the Inter-Viyos of Living' Trust. 
Hero we have an amazingly versatile 
document which provides the* vehicle for 
everything from seeing, the. grandchil-* 
dren through school, ~4<v providing profes- 
sional management of investments for 
spendthrifts, or for elderly people who 
lack confidence in their own business 
judgement. 

There are Life Insurance Trusts for 
tax savings; Business Insurance Trusts 
to provide the means for the logical 
succession of ownership, of Corporations 
or partnerships, ■ «- . .. ., , ^^ 

As Transfer and Disbursing Agent, we 
maintain records of stock ownership and 
remit to the stockholders such dividends 
as are authorized and provided for by 
the Board of Directors. We also operate 
Pension and Profit Sharing Trusts as 
we do for our own Corporation, in which 
we receive and invest donations, main- 
tain records and disburse to the partici- 
pants or their beneficiaries at the direc- 
tion of the Retirement Committee. In 
this capacity we serve many municipali- 
ties as well as all types of businesses. 
As Bankers, I am sure you all are fami- 
liar with Escrows and their various func- 
tions, so we will not attempt to expound 
on this very adaptable and versatile 
function. 

Let us emphasize, again, that these 
services are offered by your Trust De- 
partment here in your Bank, and that 
they are provided by your Board of 
Directors in their unceasing efforts to 
provide the best and most complete 
banking facilities possible. Xet^me- add- 
here in all modesty, that these services 
are being supplied the public „on an in- 
creasingly profitable basis and have 
served to enhance our Bank's already 
enviable reputation throughout the State, 

We shall continue to add to that profit 
and reputation with your help. Remind 
your customers that we provide com- 
plete Trust services, and that we .will 
be most pleased to have the opportunity 
of serving them. 



11 



'Pe/ttowcdtfy SfieatUaf 



• • © 




It's GREAT to be an AMERICAN! 

It's a PRIVILEGE to know we can attend church, and worship as we 
pleasel 

It's TERRIFIC~to beTable to state an opinion — pro or con— -openly arid' 
Ioudlyl 

It's SUPER to be able to read, look at, and listen to, material WE select! 
Am I Flag Waving? Boasting and bragging about our way of life in the 
United. States? 

YOU BET I AM! 

Am I telling in essence of our FREEDOM and LIBERTY, as opposed 
to the incredible oppressions of those who live in the shadow of the 
Kremlin, and those who feel the monstrous weight of the far-reaching 
tentacles of Communism? 

YES! 

AND WHY NOT! 



As ]. Edgar Hoover states in his book, "Masters of Deceit" . . . We, as 
a people have not been sufficiently articulate and forceful in expressing 
pride in our traditions and ideals. As Americans we should stand up, 
speak of it, and let the world see our light of freedom, rather than con- 
ceal it.. For too long we have had a tendency to keep silent while the 
Communists, their sympathizers, and their fellow travelers have been 
telling the world what is wrong with Democracy." ' 

Like the man says — Let's talk it up. Let's drown out the "Doom Merch- 
ants," the spineless "Shruggers," the "Whatcanyoudo'ers." Read Mr. 
Hoover's statement again. Study it. Remember it. And when the oppor- 
tunity comes— and it will— express justifiable pride in your country and 
what it stands for. 

We can be truly Thankful Every Day of the 
Year, for the many blessings we enjoy. 

Yes— It's GREAT to be an AMERICAN! 

Isn't it! 




> 






35 ijt 



eapd of 



OUTSTANDING SERVICE 




*J 



fyeutuanfy t962 




NOTES 




LITTLE RIVER BANK and TRUST COMPANY 



8p17 NORTHEAST 2nd AVENUE 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 



*»^ * - *► 



BANK... djlk Contents 

NOTES: Ahtthr 2 

About the Cover ,. ... 2 

Vo1,5 ^°- 1 Message from Mr. Garner 3 

. . . Dedicated to Progress . . . Through Have You Heard „ v . w .>.,. 4 

Mutual Understanding and Apprecia- ' f . '; 

Hon for each other. On-The-Job Banking" 5 

advisory board Christmas Party .....«^....^........... 6-7 

DANIEL C. NORTHROP _ 

Vice President Thank You, Directors ..,.,.... » 

EDWIN M. GRAHAM , ^ BirtM 8 

Vice President * "; ' 

. * ♦ * "Checkmates" Officers 9 

editor The .Welcome Mat „., .,,.,... 10 

LYNN D. BROWNE 

A Good Thing ,. 10 

* * * * * 

STAFF Welcome and Thanks 11 

Virginia Asbury 

"Ten Commandments" .............. 11 

Lorraine Aufford 

Judith Kaufmarin 

Personally Speaking..,. Back Cover 
Mae Teubner * . . * 

Dorothy - Wallace u>*j>> * 

7" — s — ABOUT THE COVER • • • 

£iiiAQ "^Pw^ iT^Te I Volume IV depicted on the front 

I ^jffl *^W * cover si S nif l^ s the * completion of 

„ " : lBf .. . ; ,, ■ ' ./ Bank Notes ^fourth .year. This is 

Member South Florida Industrial Editors Association * *" ' 

Southern Council Editors Association the first iSSUe Of the fifth year for 

International Council 0/ Industrial Editors 

L. our .magazine.** 

2 







A highly important factor hi the growth of our bank is 
the service we give to our customers. This cannot be over- 
emphasized. Since we were established in 1926, we have insti- 
tuted new systems, added, new machines, and expanded our 
facilities to take care of the needs of our depositors. 

Now in our 35th year, we continue to keep pace with the 
banking requirements of the community. However, while all 
of these factors merit their share of importance, in the final 
analysis — systems, machines, and conveniences^ rely on the 
human element for success and^workabiliiy. 

Therefore, it is important that we use these mediums* to 
their best advantage, and inject the personal touch when serv- 
ing our customers. Personalized Service . . . is not only a 
desirable factor, but will reflect in our continued growth and 
prosperity . . . and in yours. 




*%i0g IfiaU *i¥eand 



by "LIndy" 

The Holidays have come and gone with their hustle and bustle — sparkle 
and gleam— and very special aura. Our bank took on its traditional festive 
attire which reflected tKe good taste of Walter W. Asmus, (VP and — 
Treas.) — "Bobbi" was her pert, accomplished self at the organ-— the tree 
in the lobby was especially beautiful this year— the Santas at the Teller 
windows— the special arrangement around' the clock — and wreaths at the 
windows all played^their part in establishing Christmas in our bank. The 

Trust Dept. had. its own tree — outside Teller windows were decorated 

* 

too — and even the door to the stockroom was decked with a wreath, 
courtesy of Tom Doell, who made it. It took a lot of effort getting our bank 
"dressed for Christmas" and thanks to Tom Doell, Ed Herrschaft, Willie 
Nicholson, Leroy Stebbins, and Willie Scott. But more enchanting than 
the planned decorations were the individual efforts of co-workers thruout 
the bank. There wasn't a department that didn't have its own lighted tree. 
And of course, our Cafeteria was as usual the center of behind-the-scenes 
attractiveness as a result of the inimitable touch of Gladys Haldy, Kath- 
arine Evers and Vivian LaPorte, who decorate for any and all occasions 
and by so doing make our cafeteria a very special place to be . . . Christmas 
started for us more or less officially with our Christmas Dinner Dance 
at Miami Shores Country Club. It doesn't seem as tho it could get any ! 

better but somehow it does each year, and many, many times was the 
remark heard "This is the best party we've ever had." High point of the ' 

evening was the presentation of Mr. Garner's gift, given him by Officers i 

and Personnel of our bank, and all those who are with Garner Insurance j 

and Mortgage Company, and who always attend the party too. Glamour j 

prevails that nite — and fun is foremost. But there are endless details and 
chores that go into the planning and execution of a successful affair for j 

which, appreciation is given to Edwin M. Graham (VP), Albert J. Sokoll, ' 

(AVP), Lorraine Aufford, Mae Teubner, Rosemary O'Roiirke, Joan Smith 
and Earl Helfman. (Heaven help me if someone is overlooked. Please! It's j 

not intentional!) Last but NOT least our thanks to James G. Garner, Presi- j 

dent, who "gives" us our annual Christmas Party . . . Christmas time was \ 

also a time of vacations, and trips home to the folks. It was an 'at home' time J 

for De Merle L. Harper (AS), and for Julie Partch too . . . while traveling \ 

was done by JoAnn and John Fuscoe to Youngstown, O. for the Holidays ... 

(Continued on Page 10) I 

4 



ON-THEJOB BANKING 



by WILLIAM F. DUNCAN 
Assistant Treasurer 



In an effort to combat Credit Union 
competition, the American Banker's 
Association Committee on Credit Un- 
ions recommends commercial banks 
adopt On-The-Job or In-Plant Banking 
services. An article to this effect was 
carried in an issue of the Florida 
Banker's Association Bulletin, with 
the information that operating proce- 
dure for this type of program was 
available from ABA sources. As a re- 
sult of this, the writer made inquiry 
to the ABA and received a "How-To- 
Do-It " Kit, which established ground- 
work procedure for our bank. 

We also learned at that time, that 
a number of prominent financial in- 
stitutions throughout the country were 
eitlier already initiating a program, 
or seriously contemplating installing 
one. These include: The Bank of 
America, The Continental Illinois Na- 
tional Bank and Trust Company, The 
Citizens and Southern National Bank, 
The First National Bank of Atlanta, 
The Fulton Bank and Trust Company 
of Georgia, First National City Bank of 
New York, Wachovia Bank anil Trust 
Company, The Mellon National Bank and 
Trust uompany, Republic National Kank, 
Union Planters National Bank, and First 
National Bank "at Orlando, FJa. 

We then communicated* with the Or- 
lando bank, since we felt they would be 
most familiar with our geographical 
and economic conditions. They replied 
promptly and rendered a good deal ,of 
assistance by furnishing us with a com- 
prehensive sales program; 

Several conferences were held with 
Senior Officers of our bank, and the 
T writer was greatly assisted by Walter W. 
Asmus, Vice President and Treasurer; 
Edwin M. Graham, Vice President; and 
John A. Wilshear, Jr.,^ Assistant Vice 
President. Additional atlvice and guid- 
ance was given by Raymond E. Morlock, 
Senior Vice President; Bernard E. Bol- 
din, Vice President; and Daniel C. North- 
rop, Vice President. The program was 
then discussed "with James "G.* Garner, T 
President, and final approval was ob- 
tained. I .wish to stress, that this pro- 
gram could not have become a reality 
without the cooperation of the officers 
listed above; and many others who 
assisted. 

It was then recommended that the 
writer should institute several pilot in- 
stallations with the assistance of Earl 
Hfelfman, of our Business Development 
Department. We compiled additional in- 
formation, made added inquiries, and 





BmKlmtas 






'VOT • j JT , *T pl ' 1 T" WI ili' J Mli''.fW i 



Mr. Duncan left, and Earl Helfman check a 
display for On-The-Job Banking. 

finally "went to press" and ordered our 
first On-The-Job Banking service racks. 
Further conferences with Mr. Asmus and 
Mr. Wilshear, resulted in the; designing 
of suitable forms applicable to our needs, 
which were subsequently ordered. 

Now that we have discussed the im- 
plementation of this program, perhaps 
we should explain some of its advan- 
tages. First of all . . . sixty percent of 
all people employed on an hourly basis 
in plants and similar occupations, do not 
have any banking connections whatso- 
ever. Therefore, it is not easy for them 
to develop good thrift habits as they are 
forced through necessity to seek finan- 
cial assistance from high rate lending 
organizations. 

For employers, this program provides 
an added fringe benefit available to em- 
ployees, at no expense to the company. 
It also reduces absenteeism of employees 
who have to transact personal ^business 
during working hours s For employers 
without credit' "unions, there isn't" any 
space problem with this type of service. 
In addition, it is unnecessary to employ 
extra personnel to staff a credit union, 
nor is an outlay of funds necessary for 
the purchase of specialized equipments 
Further, employees prefer dealing di- 
rectly with the bank to keep their trans- 
actions confidential, and Oh=The»Job 
Banking services makes this possible. 

Banks entering this program, are pre- 
sented with an entirely new challenge by 
(Continued on Page 9) 



*: 



Board of Directors ■ 

Little River Bank and Trust Company 

Gentlemen: 

It is again our pleasure to be able to thank you for the 
Christmas bonuses you so kindly approved for us. 

The Holiday Season always has an extra sparkle to it 
because of your thoughtfulness. We want you to know we 
appreciate your generosity. 

We trust you enjoyed Happy Holidays, and wish you 
continued good health and prosperity -in this \New Year. 

Sincerely, 

Personnel 

Little River Bank and 
Trust Company 



^cJfatifnj ihUithdau to y (Joui 



I 




XJ 



FEBRUARY 

3 



u.*f*fn-t£** j 



ft«0*W«»*^T*< 



Mayson Blouin— Block *.,.,„ 
Leroy Stebbins— Janitor ^» 
Jeannine Marks— Bookkeeping ,^.^ 
Edward Herrschaft— Teller 
Jimmie May Tooker— Bookkeeping 
Sally Broe— Check Imprinting .*w 

Carol Berger— Return Items „-. * 

Inez Fasig—Bookkeeping .„„-...„ -.., 

Thomas Doell— Stock Room , A >.,ww,*.„. 25 
Ruth Sarhan— Secretary to Mr. Asmus 26 
John A. Wilshear, Jr.— 

Assistant Vice President .„*»*„._.*,»»* 26 
Evelyn Byrd— Bookkeeping *..*..*«».»«- 27 



8 

12 
13 
13 
14 
19 
19 



MARCH 

Alice Hoban— Analysis .„ A( .,„.,Y.. rt w>«a.-. 2 

Patrick: Garzon— Mail Teller m , — 6 

John McArthur^r-Teller .„..*„.*...««„*«** 6 
Helen Snyder— Bookkeeping *.,.«.*.....«*«,. 8 
Barbara Hughes— Bookkeeping A , An ,,.. M 17 

Alice Peet^Centra! Teller » wm 18 

Winifred Maxson— Bookkeeping. *«*.<».«< 19 

Forrest Nielsen— Trust ,„ ..„.*..— 19 

Marian Tilghman— Teller *..w„-» 19 

Miriam White— Analysis ....... , -*»«. 24 

C. Lawrence Lynch— 

Assistant Treasurer „ r. ,„^« 27 

Elizaebth Krutzer— Teller * *L 28 




8 



' @6ec&mate&" Sfect *HeM Ofytcena 



A new slate of officers was recently 
elected by members of "Checkmates," 
our social and service club. They are as 
follows: Earl Helfman, president; Ed- 
ward Herrschaft, vice president; Jac- 
queline Cravero, secretary; Betty Ham- 
ilton, treasurer. 

For the benefit of our new co-workers 
"Checkmates" was founded after World 
War II, for the purpose of eliminating 
individual collections for gifts. Through 
the years it has remembered brides-to- 
be, mothers-to-be, those who left our 
bank, flowers for the ill" and hospitalized 
and many others according to policy as 
set in the by-laws. With its concentrated 
funds derived from dues, "Checkmates" 
has been able to do many fine things for 
many people. 

"Checkmates" is primarily a service 
club~not a social organization. However, 
there is: usually enough money for a pic- 
nic or similar get-together that is antici- 
pated each year, 

To be an officer of "Checkmates" en- 
tails a good deal of conscientious effort 
throughout the year. There is a consid- 
erable amount of money to be handled 
and accounted for, records to be kept; 
gifts to be purchased; flowers to be or- 
dered and numerous other details equally 
important, As for the social events . . * 
if you've ever planned a party a home 
you have an idea of the work entailed., 
"Checkmates" has over 100 members. 
Trying to please that, many people is not 
an easy task. 

To be a good Officer of "Checkmates" 
means doing your level best to make the 
social affairs enjoyable, and taking care 
of the many duties and chores that con- 
tinually demand attention. We recognize 
the fact that all our past officers have 
done this. We know the co-workers now 
in office will continue to carry on in this 
tradition. 

To be a good member of "Checkmates" 
means to pay your dues promptly, and 
to be considerate. If you go to a social 
event and something does not quite 
please you, be charitable. Remember 
the officers do their best for all con- 
cerned, and it is quite possible that one 
day you too will be a "Checkmates" 
Officer, and will then realize how im- 
portant it is to receive understanding 
and cooperation. 

Membership in "Checkmates" is open 
to all co-workers. If you haven't joined 
do so now. You'll find it a good feeling 
to know that your contribution helped to 
make someone happy. And should the 
occasion arise you too, will be remem- 
bered in return. 




New "Checkmates" officers are 
left, Jacqueline Cravero, secre- 
tary; Betty Hamilton, treasurer. 
Left, Edward Herrschaft, vice 
president; and Earl Helfman, 
president. 



(Continued from Page 5) 
penetrating a previously untapped source 
of new business. There is also a closer 
working relationship created between 
the bank and the employer, which places 
the bank in a more favorable competi- 
tive position. 

We are now pleased to report that we 
have completed our first installation with 
the Winn-Dixie Stores of Florida, Inc., 
more familiarly known as the "Kwik- 
Chek" stores. It is now possible for their 
employees, by following a simple pro- 
cedure to: l~open Special Checking Ac- 
counts 2-^take advantage of our Syste- 
matic Saving Plan program (initiated by 
Mr. Graham) which will be offered in 
conjunction with Special Checking 3-^ 
open Savings Accounts and 4— obtain 
Installment Loans. 

Necessary forms are installed in racks 
at the plant, and all that is necessary to 
obtain our services is to complete the 
simplified forms and return them by 
mail to our bank, in the self-addressed, 
stamped envelope provided. 

Although we are most enthusiastic 
about this program we do not anticipate 
a great deal of response in the imme- 
diate future. It will be necessary to com- 
plete the remainder of the installations 
before indications as to future returns 
may be estimated. Inquiries regarding 
this new program should be directed to 
Earl Helfman, Business Development; or 
to myself, in the Loan Department. 



THE WELCOME MAT 



JEAN BARNEY-^Blbck . .- . Formerly 
worked at First National Bank of Louis- 
ville, Ky. for about 8 years in the Book- 
keeping Dept Jean's husband John was 
transferred here recently.. They have a 
son Chris, 4 months. Attend St- John The 
Apostle Catholic.Churchin'Hialeah. Hob*-" 
bies-niancing, swimming, and jazz. 

WALDA SMART— Block . . , Call her 
"Wally." Originally from New York City, 
Wally formerly was at The Hialeah- 
Miami Springs Bank in the Block, Dept. 
Attends First Methodist Church; Hialeah 
and sings first soprano in the choir. 
Likes roller skating, and water sports. 

JOHN McARTIIUR-^Teller . . . Born in 
Toronto, Canada, and formerly with The 
Toronto Dominion" Bank, 'where he was 
a Foreign Exchange Officer- John worked 
at Miami National as a Teller. Is mar- 
ried to Isabel; hobbies— reading and 
electronics. 

RONALD COMAN— Collections . . . Be- 
fore coming to our bank was at Com- 
munity National where he was a Teller, 
and worked in Bookkeeping. Born in Mi- 
ami, graduate of Miami Central Hi. Was ' 
secretary-treasurer of the "Key Club/' 
served on the Student Council, Ronald 
attends Parkway Baptist Church, likes 
reading, and swimming. 



(Continued front Page 4) 
Earl Helfman to Sheboygan, Wis. . . . 
Maxine Scroggs to Orlando . . . Inez 
Fasig to Akron, O. (Inez plane ticket 
was a family gift) . . . and Tom Doell 
to Montgomery, Ala. - . . On the other 
hand, other folks had friends and rela- 
tives visit with, them for the Yuletide 
Season . . . Willie Nicholson's daughter 
Meriam came from Tuskegee Inst, in 
Alabama, whe're she is a Junior . . . 
"Chip" Coon SP/4 Signal Corps, USA 
visited Aunt Angela Burke, before being 
transferred to Germany . v - The E. M. 
Grahams (VP) welcomed Betty Anne 
and Ned . . . Alice lioban's son Thomas, 
had leave from the Norfolk Naval Base 
. . . Bob Stewart's brother Fxed came 
from Orlando . . . Harriet Guise' son Don 
was home on his first leave . . . Sara 



WILLIE SCOTT— Janitor . . . From Val- 
dosta, Ga., is married to Esther, and has 
three children Alfred, Darlene, and Fan- 
nie Mae. Scott is a Trustee for St. James 
AME Church; Chairman of its Finance 
Committee; President^ the Male Chorus^ 
for which he is a Tenor, and also a mem- 
ber of Choir No. 2. Is President of the 
Dorsey Junior Hi PTA, the largest negro 
PTA in the County. Devotes his time to 
school, church work, and children for 
whom he organizes recreation. Partici- 
pates in Heart Fund Drive and United 
Fund; Served as' UF Captain for the Lib- 
erty City area. 

PATRICK GARZON— Mail Teller . . . 
Pat is from New York City where he 
was with a Credit Corp. as adjuster and 
investigator, In line with his work took 
a course at New York Institute of Crim- 
inology. Also attended Boston University, 
majored in Social Science. Attends St. 
Patrick's Church, Miami Beach. Hobbies 
are reading, and photography. 

FRANK VECCHIONE— Coin Wrapper . . . 
Former resident of New York where he 
was a textile printer. Came to Miami 
in 1951, worked locally before coming to 
our bank. Frank attends St. Mary's 
Chapel and is a member of the Senior 
Citizen's Club at Soar Park, where he 
plays Shuffleboard. 



Kulok's mother journeyed from Argen- 
tina to be with her . . . Dorine Hebert's 
friend Marcus travelled from Mo. . . . 
Jeannine Marks sister "Glnnle" and 
family from O.O.T. ... and while he 



A GOOD THING . , . 

. . v is always worth repeating. 
That's why Bank Notes again car- 
ries "The Ten Commandments of 
Good Business." They formerly ap- 
peared in July, 1959. The first issue of 
this year of 1962 seemed; a propitious 
time to repeat the "Commandments" 
which are particularly pertinent with 
reference to Mr. Garner's message, 
on page 3- 



Y 



10 



couldn't l>e with her, Lucile Petrie was 
most thrilled at receiving a Mars-gram , 
from son Harold, stationed in Germany^ 
. : . Wonderful Deed was that of C. 
Lawrence Lynch (AT) who was Santa 
Claus for the youngsters at Crippled, 
Children's Society in Fort Lauderdale 
, B . This *N That— Congratulations to 
Dolores and Raymond Matthews who 
were recently wed ... St. Valentine's 
Day is the date set for wedding of Jim, 
son of Winnie Jtfaxsqn, to Avolone. (He 
is the same young man who just about- 
a year ago underwent amazingly suc- 
cessful heart surgery) . , . Best wishes 
to recently engaged Lynn Scott and Bob 
Sheldon. Lyxin just come thru a pretty 
rough time of* two operations at St.^ 
Francis. Concerned coworkers sond 
her greetings . . .Best Wishes to Anne 
MacNulty on her engagement to -Chuck" 
Daniels of Chi., . . . Congratulations to 
Bill Duncan (AT) recently elected 
Secretary-Treasure^, of ^Miami Shores 
X-change Club. (Happened while he 
was hospitalized.) \ . . Wonderful sur- 
prise for *Dot Wallace who was gifted 
with red, recT toses from George, for 
their Third Wedding Anniversary . ,. . 
Grandad Forrest Nielsen's twin daugh- 
ters Beverly and Barbara will again be 
adding to ,the family .... and if we 
were to relate * ALL the. doings in our 
bank at this time of the year, there 
wouldn't be space for anything else. How- 
ever, we can still continue to enjoy the 
memories of a Wonderful Holiday Sea- 
son^and look forward to this Bright -New 
Year of 1962. 



r 



-WELCOME and THANKS! 



Welcome to Virginia Asbury, new 
Bank Notes staffer. Virginia replaces 
Inez Fasig, who has been on the staff 
since Bank Notes was established. 
Many thanks are extended to Inez, 
for. her faithful reporting through 
4he years. \"\ / 



TEN COMMANDMENTS 
OF GOOD BUSINESS 

r i 

^ ^ ■ \ * ^ * * X \ 

A Customer . .n is the most im- 
portant* person in any busi- 
ness. 

A Customer' . . . is not dependent 
on us, we ar.e dependent on 
'him. , 

A Customer . . . is not an inter- 
ruption of our work, he is 
the purpose of it. 

A Customer . . . does us a favor 
when he calls, we are not 
doing him a favor by serv- 
ing him. 

A Customer ... is part of our 
business, not an outsider. 

A Customer . . t . is not a cold sta- 
tistic, he is a flesh-and-blood 
human being with fpelings 
and emotions like our own. 

A Customer*. . . is not* someone 
to argue or f match wits with. 

.A* Customer'.* . . is a person who 
brings us his wants, it is our 
job to fill those wants. 

A Customer ... is deserving of 
the most courteous and at- 
tentive treatment we can 
give him. A 

A Customer ... is the life 1 blood $ 
4 of this and every other busi- '* 
ness. 






'Pety&MtGitty Sfiea&ietf 





35 




ecii*6 of 

OUTSTANDING SERVICE 




• • • 

f 

The following came to my attention from H 

John A. Wilshear, Jr., Assistant Vice President, "' 

who thought it rather interesting. It is that ~ % ' 

and more *-> as you will find when you read it. 

Bryce Harlow, who Was former President 
Eisenhower's assistant, has this to say about 
Russia. Quote . . . 1 no longer run around 
demanding that America," catch up" with Russia. 
j // we did that we'd have to rip up 14 of every 15 .,' J 

miles of our paved highways and two of every J 

three miles of railroads, sink eight of every nine 
ocean-going vessels, scrap 19 of every 20 cars and 
trucks, destroy 50 million TV sets and nine out 
of every 10 telephones, abandon three-fifths of 
I our steel capacity, two-thirds of our petroleum 
and nine-tenths of our natural gas. We 'd have to 
put 60 million of our people hack on farms which 
they wouldn't own, and jam most of the remain- 
der of us into city tenements holding six to 20 
^persons in each room . . . Unquote. 
\ Thought provoking —> isn't itl 






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^GMuanty i$63 




RIVER BANK and TRUST COMPANY 



8017 NORTHEAST 2nd AVENUE 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 



JUv?*, ... -\ 



$*>- 






BANK... 
N 




Contents 



V si 



Vol.6 



No. I 



. . . Dedicated to Progress , . . Through 
Mutual Understanding and Apprecia- 
tion fof each other. 



ADVISORY BOARD 

DANIEL C NORTHROP 
Vice President 

EDWIN M. GRAHAM 
Vice President, 



'<* 



* * * * 



EDITOR 

LYNN D. BROWNE 

# * * * 

STAFF 

Virginia Asbury 
Lorraine Aufford 
Judith Kaufmann 

Mae Teubner 
Dorothy Wallace 



'» 



Message*from Mr. Garner - 



Bank Notes 1957-1962 „ 



Have You Heard 






4:9"! 



"Checkmates" Officers ™_ 11 



Christmas Party — „_ 



12-13 



Happy Birthday 



>. 14 



A 



snea 





Member South Florida Industrial Editors Association 

Southern Council Editors Association 

International Council of Industrial Editors 



The Welcome Mat 



We Thank You 



_..i, d4 1 



15 f - 



Jf+A' : 







For the past five years it has been our pleasure to give you "Bank 
Notes." With the publication of the first issue in December 1957, your 
magazine has consistently appeared on a bimonthly basis. 

It's purpose has been to give you the facts and keep you informed 
of important happenings in the bank, as well as to create a closer feel- 
ing of kinship with, and for each other. At times it has assumed the role 
of instructor, and at other times it has cautioned you for your own sake. 
But it has consistently leaned toward reporting progress — yours and the 
bank's — for the benefit of all concerned. This is defined for you in the 
masthead as follows: "Dedicated to Progress Through Mutual Under- 
standing and Appreciation for Each Other." 

For your information "Bank Notes" is not only distributed to each 
and every person in the bank, but is mailed to our Directors, our Stock- 
holders, and a special mailing list of those requesting it. It also is sent 
by request to the United Nations, which has a special place for such 
publications; and to the School of Journalism and Communications, 
Stadium Library at Gainesville, where it is available to the students 
for study. 

If you were to have all the issues published since 1957, you would 
possess an interesting and comprehensive "history" of the activity within 
our bank since that time. 

this Anniversary Issue — will recap highlights of those years for you. 
It is to be hoped that you who have been with us since 1957 will enjoy 
reviewing that period. For those of you who have been employed here 
in more recent years, we trust this issue will be particularly interesting 
and informative. 




In mid-December of 1957 on a Friday morning, the first issue of Bank 
Notes was distributed' throughout the bank. Since th&t time it has been 
published _ regularly, eyeryother month for the past five years. But 
before that first publication date became effective^ many "hours were spent- 
in discussions and decisions. Policy was set, format was decided and 
such things as size, whether or not to use color, what printer to use; 
etcetera were determined ... as the first issue was to be the pacesetter 
for the issues to come. 



It may interest you to know that 
your magazine is a letterpress opera- 
tion, printed on 70 lb. coated stock. Cuts 
and mats "are used for the art wbrk.- 
Its size 6x9 was chosen because 
of its compactness and easy handling. 
Amusing is the fact that Bank Notes 
was to contain only eight pages . . . but 
just about the only issue to have eight 
pages was the first one, (there may 
have* been one more). The second issue 
necessitated twelve pages and it has 
commanded that amount ever since, with 
the exception of the times it jumped to 
sixteen pages*, 

t 

Bank Notes is the only publication of 
its kind your bank has had. The people 
who are concerned with it are listed on 
the masthead: Of the staff, (who con- 
tribute the many and sundry items for 
the popular "Have You Heard" column) 
Lorraine Aufford is the only one who 
has continued as a staffer since the first 
issue/ Mr. Northrop and Mr. Graham, 
advise should a question of policy arise, 
tynn, Browne, whose' background' in- 
cludes the publishing field has been 
• Editor since the planning stages of your 
magazine. 



Bank Notes is both an internal and an 
external publication. It communicates 
with and informs Personnel, Directors, 
Stockholders, and a special mailing list 
of those who receive 'it by request. 



When Bank Notes is being written 
its editorial content must' be viewed from 
both, an internal and an external point of 
observation. A fine balance must be kept 
between these two that is at times diffi- 



cult to achieve. With a publication that 
is both internal and external) an editor 
must be able to write from the "inside*' 
yet be objective' f rom the "outside." This 
takes understanding of the viewpoints 
of both factors, as well»as the confidence 
and cooperation of top management. 
Your Editor can state twith sincerity, 
that she has enjoyed the confidence and 
complete cooperation of management 
during these "years, and that much of the 
success of Bank Notes is due to this fact. 



What make Bank Notes ? Primarily — 
people— in fact YOU! What YOU do, 
where YOU go, YOUR sorrows and 
YOUR joys. Equally important are 
events . , . a building expansion ... a 
new service . . .added conveniences. Im- 
portant too are Officer promotions . , . 
Personnel achievements . . . new co- 
workers . . . and the function of depart- 
ments. All of this and more goes into 
Bank Notes, which is designed to* be a 
well-rounded publication that contains 
something of interest for all concerned. 



The first issue of Bank Notes fea- 
tured an article by Walter W. Asmus, 
Vice President, on the new extension. 
Mr. Asmus wrote "'Growing Pains" and 
explained the ultimate outcome of all 
the construction activity taking place at 
that time, and which finally emerged as 
our Fifth Major Expansion. The cover 
carried a picture of Mr. " Asmus ancf 
James G. Garner, Chairman of the Board 
and President, taken where our drive-ins 
now are. This issue also carried a pro- 
file on Mr. Garner, the first in the series 
"Know Your Director" and which event- 
ually included profiles on all our Direc- 
tors. "Welcome Mat" and "Have You 
Heard" were also started in this issue 
and have been an integral part of the 
magazine since that time. 



1958 



The first issue of this year, February, 
carried the start of the "Special Mes- 
sage" series written by Officers of our 
bank. The articles discussed and ex- 
plained certain factors of their respon- 
sibilities they felt would be informative 
and instructive to personnel. 



"Happy Birthday" began in this issue 
too, and has been included since that 
time. It also carried the first photos 
taken at our annual Christmas Party, 
which has become a Pictorial Feature 
of that event. 



ing of the entire personnel 1 and in a talk 
explained the necessity for the new sched- 
ule . . • unquote^Maxiy of you will recall 
that meeting, tthich was followed with 
press releases and special announcements 
sent by mail to our customers advising 
them of our new hours. 



This issue also carried the first of 
several features that were designed to 
be instructive and constructive. Its title 
was . , . "Our Bank is a Reflection of 
Ourselves." Pictures posed by co-work- 
ers depicted cooperation, friendliness, 
neatness of dress, and urged less gossip, 
and less criticism of each other. 



An important "first" was the begin- 
ning of the Departmental Features. Inez 
East, who has been a co-worker longer 
than any other employee was the first 
person to be written iip. These articles 
are designed primarily to tell the func- 
tion of the department. However, in or- 
der to create interest the articles are 
written around a co-worker to give them 
a human element. The featured co- 
worker is chosen on the basis of senority 
♦of time of service in the department. 



In September, a pictorial and editorial 
feature was carried on the Fifth Major 
Expansion, which at the time of printing 
was already occupied by Officers and 
Personnel. On the lighter side in this 
issue, was a short article on Roberta 
Alberti — our "Queenie" who won a 
beauty contest in our bank and appeared 
at the Orange Bowl to ^compete in the 
"Miss Miami Marlins, of 1958" contest. 
Roberta was one of five fanalists, which 
is no small honor in view of the stiff 
competition from banks and firms 
throughout Miami who were represented 
at the event. 



On Friday, October 3, 1958 ... we 
opened on Friday night from 5 to 7 
p.m. . . . for the first time. Bank Notes 
carried a story to this effect quote . . . 
This was by no means a sudden move, but 
the result of a survey to determine another 
way of giving our customers better service. 
When the ultimate decision was reached, 
James G, Garner, President, called a meet* 



1959 * 



On February 4th of this year our 
Cafeteria opened. The Cafeteria is a re- 
sult of "our expansion, and has contin- 
ued to give pleasure and satisfaction 
since its opening date. It filled a need 
that was only fully realized with its 
completion. It has consistently added to 
our comfort and well-being and has been 
successful far beyond anticipation. 



Not too many people in our bank 
realize to what extent our Officers par- 
ticipate in clubs and organizations. This 
was brought to our attention in the May 
issue, with the feature . . . "Our Officers 
Exemplify Today's Community Leaders." 
It listed their memberships and pictured 
them at meetings. Our Officers are 
urged to join clubs and organizations, 
take active part in them, and participate 
in many worthwhile events. 

In May 1959 two of our Directors, Mr. 
Hugh P. Emerson, president, Aeroland 
Oil Co., and Mr. Earle M. Rader, senior 
partner and founder, Rader and Asso- 
ciates, Engineers and Architects; were 
part of the first group of prominent 
businessmen who journeyed to Moscow 
to interview Nikita Khrushchev. In light 
of world conditions today, the article on 
their trip may be of interest to you. It 
is reprinted in full as it app'eared in the 
July 1959 issue, of bank Notes. 



THEY WENT BEHIND THE 
"IRON CURTAIN*' 

On May 23, 195$ "forty-five ^business 
men and civic leaders throughout South 
Florida, participated in a two hour in- 
terview with Nikita Khrushchqv, in Mos- 
cow, Russia. 





EMERSON 



RADER 



Two, of the men who were in the group 
are Directors of our Bank. .JFhey are 
Hugh P. Emerson, president, Aeroland 
Oil Co., and Earle M. Rader, senior 
partner- and founder, Rader and Associ- 
ates; Engineers and Architects* 

This was the first such interview ever 
granted to men of a non-official status. 
Ralph Renick, Vice President in charge 
of News for WTVJ, was spokesman dur- 
ing the interview which was conducted 
through an interpreter. 

Although Mr. Emerson, and Mr. Rad- 
er, did not speak directly to Khrushchev, 
their observations of him and of the 
people of Russia bore one thing in com* 
mon. Khrushchev is an extremely in- 
telligent person, and the Russians on the 
whole, are content with the present 
regime. 

Mr. Rader stated, "The people seem 
to be happy with Communism and are 
making it work, at least to a degree." 
He went on to point out that under the 
rule of the Czar, the people were "terri- 
bly oppressed, nothing but slaves. Now 
they have something, although the satel- 
lite countries are in a very bad way." 

Mr. Rader feels however, that in the 
final analysis Communism will fail be- 
cause of two things. "No country," he 
said, "can ever survive without Reli- 
gion, and the fact that people cannot 
accumulate estates will not, in the long 
run, aid Communism." 

Mr. Emerson was impressed with 
Khrushchev's political sagacity. "He's a 
very smart politician," he commented, 
"well informed and extremely aware of 
the 'International Front/ I feel," he con- 



tinued, "that if Khrushchev wanted to, 
and providing we had a World Govern- 
ment, he could be, elected president." 

According to Mr. Emerson, the people 
are -thoroughly* indoctrinated with Com- 
munism. They are dedicated, and 'sold- 
on their Government. 

The people were /friendly, courteous 
and seemed to appreciate the group's 
visit. Hotel accomodations were com- 
fortably acceptable, and food was fairly 
good. Mr. Emerson said however, that 
he "missed havings a good„cup of coffee, 
and they don't seem to know what iced 
lea is. But wine and champagne is 
plentiful." 

He found the children very interesting. 
After attending Kindergarten, they go 
into what is referred to as a Pioneer 
Group. He said each group wears Ats 
own emblem, which they were glad to 
exchange for American candy or gurn. 
It impressed him that they did every- 
thing as a "group." He said he .saw 
many children marching in formation 
on their way to recreational pursuits 
such as swimming, soccer and volley 
ball. They even inarched in formation 
to Cafeterias* Mr. Emerson further 
stated that he did not see any "tennis 
courts or golf courses." 

Mr. Rader and Mr. Emer3on, felt that 
although the trip was strenuous, it was 
extremely interesting, educational, and 
a wonderful opportunity to gain knowl- 
edge of a country which is similar in 
size, to our United States. 



The September issue told about A.I.B., 
The American Institute of Ranking. It 
was organized in 1900 as a result of 
requests by bank employees in various 
cities for a program of education that 
would enable them to understand more 
clearly the work they were doing. The 
Institute's general plan of operation has 
been to carry on its activities through 
local organizations called Chapters, 
thereby creating the opportunity to ac- 
quire a knowledge of specialized banking 
subjects for both men and women 
throughout the United States and its 
possessions. Richard C. Boggs, our Exe- 
cutive Vice President and Trust Officer, 
is a past-President of the Miami Chapter 
A.I.B., having served 1949-1950. 

In November, Bank Notes cautioned 
about "Carelessness." "Don't Prove 
You Care Less by Being Careless," was 
the feature that pointed out how you 




could injure yourself in spite of the 
many precautions the bank has taken 
for your safety and well-being. Dangers 

Eictured were — open file drawers over- 
ead, open desk drawers, tilting back on 
chair legs instead of sitting properly, 
rounding corners heads down, descend- 
ing steps with arms laden, and using 
machines with little regard for fingers. 



I960 



This year's first issue — January — 
inaugurated the "Man Behind the Title" 
series, with a story on Walter W. Asmus, 
Vice President. The series is designed to 
help co-workers understand the man- 
rather than just the title — and in so do- 
ing create a better working relationship. 

In March, Bank Notes carried a fea- 
ture on machines throughout the bank, 
with pictures of many that are used and 
identification of same. There was quite a 
lot of interest regarding this feature, 
since many times people in one depart* 
ment will not be too familiar with mach- 
ines used by folks in another department. 

Free Personalized Checks and Monthly 
Statements for Special Checking Ac- 
count customers, to go into effect about 
April 1, was duly reported on for 
your information. To quote . . . State- 
ments for SCA Accounts which have 
formerly been mailed on a quarterly 
basis, will with the innovation of SCA 
Personalized Checks — be mailed each 
month . • . unquote. 

"How Do You Rate" . , . was an in- 
structive feature of the May issue, 
stressing courtesy to our customers at- 
all times. Co-workers cooperated in 
posing for pictures graphically portray- 
ing how one could unconsciously offend. 

The July issue carried a story on 
William Baraket, Vice President and 
Trust Officer; and John A. Wilshear, 
Jr., Secretary and Treasurer, who had 
recently returned m from two weeks of 
intensive indoctrination in selective 
banking schools. This was the first step 
of a concentrated three year session for 
these officers which included two weeks 
of each year at their individual schools, 
supplemented with extension problems 
throughout the year. 



A feature on "Simplicity — the Keynote 
to Being Well-Dressed" was carried in 
the September issue. Neatness and ap- 
propriate attire for business was stress- 
ed, and portrayed with pictures. 



1961 



In January, the message from Mr. 
Garner stated that the bank not only in- 
tended to maintain a high standard of 
operation . . . "but to better it as time goes 
on* This can only be achieved through co- 
operation*— your cooperation. For that rea- 
son, Bank Notes again brings you a mes- 
sage . . . which emphasizes how you can 
cooperate more fully, and thereby help to 
exceed past achievements. We know yon 
will read it with perception and understand' 
ing and we anticipate a year of mutual 
satisfaction and accomplishments 



The editorial content of this feature 
entitled "There's Always Room for One 
More New Year's Resolution," urged us 
to remember at all times that . . . 
"wherever you go . . - whomever you 
associate with, you are in essence an 
extension of this bank and as such are 
expected to conduct yourselves accord- 
ingly. You should not — under any cir- 
cumstances—use your bank as a spring- 
board for "personal glorification," nor 
should you discuss the bank in public 
places unless you do so with discretion 
and loyalty/' Further excerpts are as 
follows: ''Important too — is a common 
sense attitude toward the extent of 
your social life with regard to getting 
a sufficient amount of rest and proper 
nourishment for on-the-job efficiency. 
If you're not "up to it" you cannot do 
your share of the day's work properly. 
Results can be costly in errors, the extra 
amount of time needed to accomplish a 
task, or the putting off of chores until 
tomorrow that should have been com- 
pleted today . . s There isn't any "mys- 
tery" in the fact that if you're too 
"tired" or "sluggish," you cannot do 
your work properly . . . You are urged 
to start the New Year right! ... In 
adhering to these precepts you cannot 
help but realize that a feeling of phys- 
ical fitness plus the knowledge of a 
day's work well done . . . will in time 
"reflect favorably for you." 




March carried an article on "SSP — 
Our New Customer Service." Put into 
effect about this time the Systematic- 
Saving-Plan was designed to make 
saving automatic and. easy for the bene-- 
-fit of our-* customers.— The -article ex- 
plained that upon receiving a signed 
agreement from a customer, "We will 
do one of two things,/ transfer a set 
amount each month (not less than 
$10.00) from the customer's Checking 
Account to his Savings Account, or open 
a Savings Account (in the event he does 
not have - one) for not less than $10.00. 
The customer's Savings Account will 
then be automatically credited each 
month in the amount he designates (but 
not less than $10.00) per month/and his 
Checking Account charged. 



With all the talk of converting to 
Automation — that issue also carried a 
story as to how it would affect our bank. 
It was headed "Don't Let Automation 
Confuse You" and explained how a grad- 
ual conversion would have no adverse 
affects on personnel. Complete Automa- 
tion is a process that takes several 
years, and is usually done in various 
stages. It is not to be confused with the 
popular misconception that people would 
be "thrown out of work overnight" It 
went on to explain that "in the natural 
course of events Personnel will leave 
our bank of their own accord, for such 
reasons as retirement, marriage, preg- 
nancy, etcetera. As our bank grows it 
would be necessary to hire more Per- 
sonnel to take care of our customers. 
Automation minimizes this necessity 
since the use of machines will automatic- 
ally step up production. By the time 
complete automation would be accom- 
plished, it is safe to assume that Per- 
sonnel then on hand, would be necessary 
for operation of the machines. 



In May, the article "For Your Infor- 
mation" related the beginning of the use 
of Mechanical Validation of Deposits. 
Tellers had received new machines which 
enabled them to give customers a de- 
tailed duplicate deposit receipt, which is 
a carbon copy of the original. This eli- 
minated the necessity of tellers making 
out pink tickets, and because of the com- 
plete data on the duplicate deposit re- 
ceipt, passbooks are no longer necessary. 
Reported too, was the fact that Personal 
Checking Account customers would now 
receive Personalized Checks, without 



charge. New Check Books imprinted 
with the individual's name were mailed 
with an announcement stating "It is our 
pleasure to present your first book of 
Personalized Checks." Enclosed with the 
book-were deposit slips and ~ a -reorder*-- 
blank. (Special Checking Account custo- 
mers had been receiving personalized 
checks for well over a year.) 



In August our bank observed its. 35 th 
Anniversary. Outdoor advertising signs, . 
newspaper ads/ radw spot announce- 
ments and stuff ers proclaimed this fact 
to the public. The story was also car- 
ried in the September issue of ypur 
magazine. Excerpts that will be of inter- 
est are as follows: "It was on a Monday 
morning 35 years ago— that our bank 
opened its doors, prepared to serve the 
banking needs of the community. The 
date was August 9, 1926 . . • the time 
9 a.m. The location was the northwest 
corner of 79th .Street and Northeast 2nd 
Ave., the site now occupied by the Little 
River Drug Store." The story related 
how our bank "weathered the Hurricane 
of 1926 and the National Depression of 
the 1930*8.!' Our first president was the 
late, Landon E. Edwards, who served 
from 1926-1932. He was succeeded by 
James G. Garner, v who served 1932-1936; 
was re-elected in 1947, and has been 
our president since that time. Mr. Gar- 
ner has been with our bank since its 
opening day. Our bank has had five 
major expansions. It was in 1937 that 
we located on our present site. Of the 
officers who have been with our bank 
for some time: Raymond E. Morlock, 
Senior Vice President has been with 
us since 1933; Daniel C. Northrop, 
Vice President, since 1935; Walter W. 
Asmus, Vice President, 1940; Richard C. 
Boggs, Executive Vice President and 
Trust Officer, 1947; George S. Ness, 
Senior Vice President and Comptroller, 
1950, and Cadwalader Woodville, Jr., 
Vice President, since 1950. 



Although our bank is necessarily a 
serious place of business, it also has a 
very human side to it. This was re- 
flected in the story in the November 
1961 issue entitled "Teams We Sponsor." 
Not generally realized is the fact that 
we sponsor three bowling teams and a 
baseball team. The duties of sponsorship 
include bowling fees, sanction fees, bowl- 
ing shirits, baseball uniforms, and equip- 
ment as necessary. Two of the bowling 



% 




teams, the Juniors and Bantams which 
play in the Lions Club League, were 
brought to our attention by Cadwalader 
Woodville, Jr., Vice President; an active 
member and a, past-President of Little 
River Lions Club. Our adult bowling 
team the "Delinquents," is part of the 
American Institute of Banking Bowling 
League and is comprised of co-workers. 
Our Pony League Baseball Team . , . the 
Miami Shores-Little River Bank and 
Trust Company Team . . . was brought 
to our attention by Edward M. Graham, 
Vice President. 



1962 



The July issue carried the story of the 
completion of the three year courses 
participated in by Mr. Baraket and Mr. 
Wilshear. It was headed — "Baraket and 
Wilshear Complete Three Years Inten- 
sive Studies/' Mr. Baraket specialized 
in Trust at The Stonier Graduate' School 
of Banking, Rutgers University, New 
Jersey. Mr. Wilshear specialized in Com- 
mercial Banking, at School of Banking 
of tHe South, Louisiana State Univer- 
sity, Baton Rouge, La. 



In congratulating the officers on their 
graduation, Richard C. Boggs, Execu- 



tive Vice President and Trust Officer, 
who completed a course in Trust, at 
Stonier and graduated in 1947* stated, . 
( 7/ is no small honor for these men to have 
been chosen to attend these intensive trains 
ing programs* Although the courses^ are 
extremely rigorous . . . and, Graduation a 
time for rejoicing . . . the benefits far out- 
weigh the time spent in study, for the men; 
as well as for the bank. Mr. Baraket and 
Mr. Wilshear deserve to be congratulated on 
their achievement/' 



In November, Bank Notes told of the 
installation of the Automatic Answering 
Service; and ran a shor t t story with" pic- 
tures of our new Time and Temperature 
sign, on 79th Street, and landscaping on 
either side of the sign, and at the drive- 
in windows* 



These are the highlights of' the i>ast 
five years, as reported in your magazine. 
We hbpe^you haye enjoyed reviewing 
these events. We trust that for more 
recent co-workers it will prove to be * 
helpful in acquiring a general back- 
ground of your bank. 



We start now with the first issue of 
the year 1963 .. . and ,the beginning of 
the Sixth* Year for Bank Notes. 



WW WW WW W\»* w*w 
* T WW WW WW WW 
WW WW WW 

WW w,w 
WW 



have you heard 



Although the Holidays are over, the memory of the bright decorations 
thruout the bank will linger for some time . . . The Christmas Tree that 
reached to the high ceiling of our lobby brought wondrous awe to the eyes 
of youngsters-who^gazed-at -its -brightness . . .-The* familiar- Wreaths ~ 
were hung at the windows . . . gay Santas highlighted the Teller win- 
dows . . . and organ music delighted the ears . . . Poinsettias graced 
the landscape near the drive-in windows which were also decked for the 
season . . . The Trust Department had its tree and decorative touches . . . 
as did every department throughout the -bank . . . It was quite a sight 
on the mezzanine floor to be able to see three or four trees at one time in 
various departments — all bright — all quite lovely . . . But for homi- 
riess and^nth degree Christmas Atmosphere our Cafeteria was "the" place 
. . . Katharine Evers, Gladys Haldy and Vivian LaPorte really outdid 
themselves this year in making the Cafeteria a mighty fine place to 
be ... It takes a lot of planning and hours of work to decorate our bank, 
so thanks to Ed Herrschaft, Tom Doell, Willie Nicholson, Leroy Stebbins 
and Willie Scott for their* efforts . . . ANOTHER' HIGHLIGHT of the 
Holiday Season is our Annual Christmas Party at Miami Shores Country 
Glub. With the expansion of the Country "Club, that has also been newly 

decorated, the setting for our party this year was particularly gracious 

Many were the comments on its beauty, the first quality dinner, and the 
excellent dance music . . . But dinner dances "Don't Just Happen". Many" 
plans and much work go into that evening we all enjoy. Our thanks to 
James G. Garner, President, who is our generous and pleasant -host . . . 
and to the folks who did the work — Edwin M. Graham (VP), Albert J. 
Sokoll (AVP), Mae Teubner, Earl Helfman, Lorraine Aufford, Joan Smh4, 
Mildred Graziano, Maxine Scroggs and Alice Peet ... AS USUAL per- 
sonal Christmas enjoyment was enhanced with Visits and Visitors and 
Vacations — Mary Foresteire entertained her daughter and son-in-law 
Major and Mrs. Edward Peter of Kansas ... Jo and Charlie Snyders' 
son Bob and wife "Sandy" were home from Gainesville . . . "Skip"Rocka- 
fellar, son of the Paul L. Rockafellars' (AVP) home from Annapolis . . . 
Don Guise, USN Harriet's son home from Pensacola . . . Also Bud, Carol 
Berger's brother from the USN . . . and then . . . Sylvia and Bob 
Jablonski had Sylvia's father, Kurt Walkowiak of Webster, Mass. with 
them . . . June and JL Browns' son Billy from Biloxie, Miss. Air 
Force Base . . . Gypsy Kelly's son Jeff, a Paratrooper at Ft. Bragg, N. C. 
was home too . . . Dot Madsen and her folks entertained aunt, Eileen 
Knowles of L.A. and uncle, Bill Whipple of St. Paul . . . Gloria and Don Vick 
had Don's mother, Mrs. Joyce Burke of Napa, Calif, with them . . . Willie 
and Martha Nicholsons' daughter Meriam (who will graduate in June and 

10 



"Checkmates" Officers for 1963 




At a recent meeting of 
"Checkmates" our social and 
Service Club, new officers 
were elected to serve for 1963. 
They are as follows: Edward 
Herrschaft, President, stand- 
ing left; Robert Boyer, Vice 
President, right; Carmen 
Lopez, Secretary, seated 
right, and Mary Jane Spahr, 
Treasurer. The new officers 
will carry on in the tradition 
of "Checkmates" which was 
founded soon after World 
War II for the purpose of 
eliminating individual collec- 
tions for gifts. Although 
"Checkmates" is primarily a service club, there are usually enough funds 
for a picnic and/or dance that is anticipated each year. 



Teach) home from school . . . Jean and 
Numon Dickens had Numon's folks from 
Indiana . . . Lorraine Aufford's daugh- 
ter and husband, Sandra and Ed Bunn 
came from St. Pete where Ed is study- 
ing Law at Stetson . . ■ VIP event too, 
was Lauri Aufford's Confirmation - . . 
Maribel and Niel Neville had severai 
happy holiday events ^= Maribel's folks 
Mr. and Mrs. Trout came from Spring- 
field, O. — son Tommy made All-City 
— and "Suzy" (a Kerry Blue) had 5 
puppies (but not so True Blue) . , . Al- 
though he couldn't be with his folks, 
David Slauter A-2C stationed in Pakis- 
tan thrilled parents Nelle and Walter 
Slauter with his tasteful gifts that in-, 
eluded a jewelled wine decanter, a Fez, 
etcetera . ., .Folks who had the oppor- 
tunity to visit home for the Holidays 



were Sandy Salvesen to White Plains. 
N. Y. to be with her father . . . Martha 
Ramey went to Cleveland to be delight- 
ed by grandchildren Karen Lynn and 
George David . . . Earl Helfman to She- 
boygan, Wis6. to be with his folks . ., . 
Angela Burke to Calif, to be with hus- 
band Edmund and his family , , . Christ- 
mastime also brought its quota of Wed- 
ding Plans ^— Phyllis Magruder was 
gifted with a beautiful diamond from 
Bernie Schaw, and is looking forward to 
a June Wedding. Phyllis was quite amus- 
ing with her dismay at the fact that no 
one was "surprised" at her receiving a 
ring from Bernie . . . and the Date Is 
Set, for Feb. 2 at Holy Family Catholic 
Church for Sylvia Rheault and Larry 
Doyle who are also anticipating taking 
up residence in their recently purchased 
(Continued on Page 15) 



11 












> 



.-** 



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^ 




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<?/• 








o 




t:4m k 







HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU 



U 



yj jTjj j /j n h^ 



FEBRUARY 



Leroy Stebbins — Janitor »*».-.«**. 
Edward Herrschaft — Stock Room 
Jimmie May Tooker — 

Personnel Secretary ««*«-« 



8 
13 

~—«« 13 

Sally Whitton— Bookkeeping „, — __^ 14 
Carol Berger — Bookkeeping * u * w - MWBtB 19 
Inez East — Bookkeeping ^^^^^^ 19 
Royce Decker — Exchange -^-„„ w ,-^-.*. 20 
Frederick Fiddes— Teller ,^^,^^_ 24 
Thomas Doell — Stock Room ,.-^„, ===w 25 



Ruth Hunt — Secretary to Mr. Asmus.. 26 
John A. Wilshear, Jr. — 

Secretary and Treasurer « »_«» 26 



Ronald Coman— Auditing 

Alice Hoban— Analysis w» m , 
Joanne Wilson— Block 
Joan Cherry — Teller ^ 



MARCH 

2 
2 

5 

John McArthur— Bookkeeping «*«» 6 
Helen Snyder^-Bookkeeping ,^.^„*„ 8 
Alice Peet— Central Teller ^..^.^^. 18 
Forest Nielsen — New Accounts -__-.«*.* 19 
Miriam White — Analysis v^^w^m* 24 
Elizabeth Krutzer— Teller ,«*_«««. 28 




M|t** C^O HIVW 



THE WELCOME MAT 



Recent addition to our staff of officers 
is Henry R. Carpenter, Vice President 
His principle activities will be in Loans 
and Business Development. 

Mr. Carpenter has been in the banking 
field for approximately 35 years. For 
about 18 years he was with Chase Man- 
hattan Bank of New York where he was 
a Credit Manager, He transferred to 
U. S. Trust Company 
of Newark, N. J. 
where he remained 
for about 13 years 
and was Senior Vice 
President. t 

After coming to 
Florida, Mr. Carpen- ., 
ter started a% a Vice I 
President at First 
National Bank of j 
Coral Cables, and 
later became Presi- 
dent. He served as 
President for about two years. 

Mr. Carpenter then went with A. M. 




CARPENTER 



Kidder and Co., Inc., as a Sales Repre- 
sentative specializing in handling invest- 
ment portfolios. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter reside in 
South Miami. A daughter, Mrs. William 
Krall and five grandchildren live in 
northern Florida. 

Mr. Carpenter is a past-President of 
the Greater Miami Clearing Association; 
an usher at Church of the Epiphany; 
and a member of South Miami Lodge, 
BPOE. 



RAY ZIMMERMAN— Coin Teller . . . 
Originally from Baltimore, Md. and a 
graduate of North Miami High School, 
Ray was formerly with The Hialeah- 
Miami Springs Bank in the Bookkeeping 
Dept. He is married to Marsha; and at- 
tends Rader Memorial Methodist Church 
where he is a member of "Young Mar- 
ried Couples." His* hobby is music. He 
played trombone in the school band, and 
is accordinist for his own trio "The 
Stereo-Tones." 



14 



we thank you 



Board of Directors 

Little River Bank and Trust Company 

Gentlemen: 

Once again it is our pleasure to thank you for the Christmas 
bonus you so thoughtfully approved for us. 

Christmas, that special time of the year, is, always more 
enjoyable as a result of your generosity. 

We trust you and your families had a wonderful Holi- 
day Season, and extend our best wishes for your continued 
Health and Prosperity in the New Yean 

Sincerely, 

Personnel 

Littl^River Bank 
And Trust Company 



(Continued from, Page 11) 
^y Home . . . FAMILY ADDITIONS 
looked .forward to are anticipated by 
Sally and Jim Whitton, early Summer 
. . , Laureen and Joseph Vpnkus in June 
, [ , and Jean and Numon Dickens who 
expect their second child in June . , . 
OTHER "ADDITIONS TO THE FAM- 
ILY" are Rosemary O'Rourke's plump, 
brown Poodle *— "Coco"? ?* "Pierre"? 
„— ■ from her "Nice Bosses" . . . Barbara 
Smith's wriggly and white Maltese 
"Higgihs" from husband Larry . . . and 
the 7 Puppies "Lady" Spahr presented 
to Mary Jane and Bill . , . Busy both 
Socially and Businesswise was Richard 
C. Boggs (Exec. VP&TO) who talked 
on "Community Service" at a December 
meeting of Miami Shores Rotary Club. 
A highlight of Holiday Fun for Mr. and 
Mrs;, Boggs was the Annual Rotary 
Christmas Party — held outdoors un- 
der a huge circus tent at the home of 
Rotarian Tom Baden . < s . Fun too was 
Jimmie.and Fred Tooker's "Open House" 
,on Christmas Day - . - CAUSE FOR 



HAPPINESS ^ is Virginia, born to 
Fred and Ruth Cruz at Jackson Hosp., 
Jan- 4, wt. 6 lb. 14 oz. , . . the new Mag- 
navox Organ, Pauline and Howard Mc- 
Elhaney gifted themselves' with >.. . the 
"mystery" re Dec. 20 first floor ^Person- 
nel teases (Sr VP) Ray E. Morlock about 
. . /the mew home in Miramar, Mr.. and 
Mrs. George W. (AT) Bburbeau moved 
into . , . Howard RehnTs record 220 lb. 
Deer . . > Irene Renn's 179 game for our 
"Delinquents" . ,. * June Brown's new 
Ford Fairlane . . . Vivian LaPorte's 
"car for work" , . , Merle Harper's (AS) 
new apartment shared with friend "Pat" 
% . . Doris Pickeriirs new home with the 
folks at Palm Springs North . . * Yolie 
Cappolino's son "Butch" making All 
Stars Tackle in the Northern Div* for 
M.S. Community House Unlimited . . . 
and Joel Swanson's vacation at home 
with so much accomplished . . , WEL- 
COME BACK to Sue Gates . . . Many 
Thanks to Roberta Alberti who brought 
Back Cover copy to our attention,. < .and 
A HAPPY 1963!! 



15 



tf i\i 



SL 



^ 



What YOU Can Do Id 

Fight etMHMISH and Preserve 




A 
M 
E 
R 
I 

it 

C 

A 



lert yourself - learn the. true nature and tactics of 
communism. 



ake civic programs for social improvement your business. 



xercise your right^to vote; elect representatives of integrity. 



ttack bigotry and prejudice wherever they appear; justice for all 
is the bulwark of democracy. 



J. Edgar Hoover 

Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 



+ ■ 



espect human dignity — communism arid individaul rights 
cannot coexist. 



nform yourself; knojv your, country - its history, traditions, 
and heritage. 



ombat public apathy toward communism - indifference can || 

be fatal when national survival is at stake. 



mi 




ANK 



^ O O 




| >*/o^i /?62 







t— "-^—tHi rtw an nr ' iif 



ft ^'-P 



LITTLE RIVER BANK and TRUST COMPANY 

8017 NORTHEAST 2nd AVENUE 
MIAMI. FLORIDA 



MBl 



BANK... tfSk Contents 

NOTES 

About the Cover ...*....«*«,«.*,»».. 2 

Vol. 5 - . No. 2 „ ] , 
. __ Feature Story .v...., A ...„„.,..*..<....... 3 

. . . Dedicated to Progress . . . Through Have You Heard „,«„.^ .>.,. 4 

Mutual Understanding and Apprecia- 
tion for each other. Man Behind the Title „.,.„._„v.4-5 

advisory board Harper, Panelist „.,.. rt ^,-. v ..«.^.-. 6 

DANIEL C. NORTHROP 

Vice President Board Promotions ..«>,„•,*,.-, ,„ 7 

EDWIN M. GRAHAM ' ,, r . ., T _. „ v _ 

„. „ .. t What's In It For You „>.„.,..,„>. 7 

Vice President 

» * * * Regan Retires .-.,*>.„&..,*.,>..«..*„.«. 8 

EDITOR Prn^rp^ 8 

LYNN D. BROWNE 

The Welcome Mat ...,..,...„,.,„.,... 9 

* * * * 

STAET , Happy Birthday .,..,.,..,,.,...,.., 10 

Virginia Asbury 

Baraket, Speaker ,.„.....„ rt „^* 11 

Lorraine Aufford 

Judith Kaufmann ... „. 

Profit Sharing ,„ .w..„.v.......„,...ll 

Mae Teubner 

Dorothy Wallace _ „ « , . ^ . „ 

Personally Speaking ....Back Cover 

■ — <^*^» 

SljCa ^§p S^ ABOUT THE COVER 

u / c ,«, » -j rT,-» «.. j V ... Rose Winters, is our "Cover Girl" 

Member South Florida Industrial Eiitort Association ' 

southern Council Editors Aisoeiathn for this issue. Read her story on 

International Council of Industrial Editors ^ 

; page 3. 

2 



ROSE WINTERS WELCOMES 
DAILY CHALLENGE IN BLOCK 



There are many kinds of machines 
throughout our bank that are used to 
perform various functions. Each machine 
is a necessary aid for the task if is de- 
signed to do. But the IBM machines in 
the Block Department play a particular- 
ly important role ... for this is the 
department in which every transaction 
that has taken place in our bank through- 
out the day-^is balanced out. 

Block— the final proving ground— is a 
busy place. The department has eight 
IBM macliihes that are in constant use. 
A thoroughly experienced operator is 
Rose Winters, who has be«n with our 
bank since November 3, 1958. Rose likes 
working in this department because she 
§njoys running the machines. She feels 
it a daily challenge to see if she can 
improve on the number of items she 
tabulates, and for that reason gets "a 
kick" out of her work. 

An interesting aspect to working in 
Block, is the fact that checks from all 
over the world go through the depart- 
ment and tends to give one the feeling 
of having a finger oh the "banking pulse 
of the globe." 

In addition to the machines, there is 
the markup desk. It is here that Checks 
are examined for proper endorsement; 
and are marked with the number of 
days it will take for them to clear 
through the paying bank. All items in 
excess of $500 are set aside for reexami- 
nation by the supervisor of the depart- 
ment. Checks deposited to Special Check- 
ing Accounts, and deposits opening new 
accounts, are held k . ., /.regardless of the 
amount. 

After markup, checks go to one of five 
Transit Proof Machines for routing to 
our correspondent banks. These machines 
verify the addition on the Deposit Slip, 
as well as route the checks. 

The Internal Debit Machine is used 
to route OUR checks to the proper 
ledgers such as Commercial Accounts, 
Regular Checking Accounts, Special 
Checking Accounts, Savings, Withdraw-, 
als, General Ledger Debits, Treasurer's 
Checks, Expense Vouchers, etcetera. 
These in turn are forwarded to Book- 
keeping, Savings or General Ledger for 
posting. 

The Credit Machine sorts the Deposit 
Slips, which are then processed the same 
as our checks on the Debit Machine. 
These two machines are in essence a 
control over the Transit Machines. 

Each morning, we receive "checks 
drawn on us. They reach us through 



Clearings from the following banks; First 
National of Miami; The Hialeah-Miami 
Springs Bank; People's National of Mi- 
ami Shores; Jacksonville Branch of the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Items 
are routed to the proper ledgers and at 
the same time the charges from the 
above banks are verified. 

It is interesting to note that three* 
fourths of the checks drawn on our bank, 
are received through Clearings. Items 
drawn on out-of-town or correspondent 
banks, which are to be returned by mail, 
are photographed by tho markup clerk 
before leaving our premises. Local items 
are delivered by Rolfe Armored Truck. 

When queried as to how many items 
go through Block per day, Rose ex- 
plained that at the beginning of the 
month they "average 60-63,000 per day, 
which decreases to a 42-45,000 average. 
Monday is the heaviest day of the week/' 
she continued, "there are the transac- 
tions from Friday night when we are 
open from 5 to 7 p.m., and in addition 
deposits and checks are heavy because 
of stores and shopping centers that are 
open on Saturday. This added to Mon- 
day's work, gives Block a double load 
to handle." 

At the beginning of the month the 
work is heavier too, because of all the 
Government checks that come into the . 
bank. The tourist season increases the 
amount of items in the winter months, 
as many accounts are. activated during 
that time. 

Rose went on to explain that the Block 
Department is also responsible for re- 
ports. A daily report is given to Audit- 
ing which is a breakdown of totals on 
Deposits, Checks, Items, Cash In, and 
Cash Out. A" detailed breakdown is posted 
daily in the departmental volume book 
which gives totals of all transactions. 
This is compiled at the end of the month 
in a report, typed by Rose, which is 
forwarded to George S. Ness, Senior Vice 
President and Comptroller; Daniel C. „ 
Northrop, Vice President; Albert J. So- 
koll, Assistant Vice President; and 
James V. Fagan, Assistant Secretary 
who is in charge of the Block Depart- 
ment; 

Like other departments, Block has a 
training period to help new co-workers. 
In order to aid these people, Mr. Fagan 
has written a comprehensive and de- 
tailed manual of the department's func-. 
tion, which is given new employees to 
read. According to Mr. Fagan, t it takes 
a particular temperament to be, able to 
(Continued on Page 6) 



*i¥ave fyott *i¥emd 



APPLAUSE— lor Mr. and Mrs. Gerard 
Bouchard, who recently took tests for 
their Cifieznship papers.- It's, wonderful 
to hear Gerry use "WE" when discuss- 
ing our Country. He is so PROUD! And 
their daughter Paulette, a citizen by 
virtue of her parents attaining their goal, 
is said to be delighting them with her 
talent for the Violin ... CONGRATULA- 
TIONS are in order for Newlyweds, 
Pat Garzon and former co-worker Mary 
Ann Mecale , . . CONGRATULATIONS 
too, to Dolores and Raymond Matthews 
who are looking forward to a little 
one . . . ANNIVERSARY GREETINGS 
to Dorothy and Bill Sweeney. Feb. 20th 
marked their 13th year . . . And isn't 
it a fact that the Ed Herrschaft's ob- 
served a Wedding Anniversary just re- 
cently? . i . That was the wedding of 
her brother, Arvid, that Jeannine Marks 
attended in 111. . . . But poor Sally Broe 
mixed Cheers with Tears, what with 
being maid-or-honor for friend Judy 
Mansfield— then having everything of 
value stolen from her home . . . Oh-So- 
Happy are Dick and Carol Swan over 
small Richard Glen. "Little Dick" was 
baptized on Feb. 18 at St. Mary's, with 
Bill and Connie Mooney standing in for 
the godparents who couldn't attend . . . 
ACCOMPLISHMENTS — Jean Gallub's 
daughter Martha made the swim team 
at Edison . . . Yolie Cappolino's son 
"Butch" who plays tackle, received a 
trophy, awarded each member of the 
M. S. Community House Football Team 
for 2nd place for South Fla. . . . 
"Jimmle's" husband Fred Tooker was 
one of 3 in South ,Fla. honored by the 
Boy Scouts of America, for outstanding 
work with the Scouts . . . and last but 
by no means least "Mr. Jet Regardless," 
Alice Peet's impish Boston Terrier took 
1st Prize for Local Bostons, and 2nd in 
the All Male Class. Shown by his "Aunt" 
Mae Tcubncr, this totals 4 Ribbons for 
"his highness" . . . Departmental 
Changes are numerous— Maxine Scroggs 
from Trust to Information . . . "Jackie" 
Cravero, Information to Check Imprint- 
ing .. . "Jimmie" Tooker, Sig. Control 
(Continued on Page 6) 



»^\\e 






\\ 



Will you ever forget the Christmas, C. 
Lawrence Lynch donned a Santa Claus 
suit and passed out gifts exchanged by 
the girls in Bookkeeping and Block. The 
only reason he wasn't Santa this past 
year, is because a suit couldn't be 
located. However, that didn't stop him 
from being Santa Claus for youngsters 
at The Crippled Children's SocietyMn'Ft. 
Lauderdale, all of which is by way of 
proving the kindliness of this man, as 
manifested in his ready smile and pleas* 
ant manner. 

Mr. Lynch was born Charles Lawrence, 
in Montreal, Canada, on March 27, 1918. 
He attended schools in Montreal, and 
graduated from Loyola High School in 
June, 1935. 

Following his graduation he found em- 
ployment with the Royal Bank of Canada 
where he remained for 24 years. During 
that time he completed a four^year cor- 
respondence course in Banking and Fi- 
nance conducted by Queen's University, 
for which he earned his degree/ "Fellow 
of the Canadian Banker's Association." 
These courses are similar to our Ameri- 
can Institute of Banking classes, which 
Mr. Lynch conscientiously attends. 

He worked In fifteen branches of RBC, 
and held every position in branch bank* 
ing up to and including that of Branch 
Manager. As an Accountant ho was re- 
sponsible for the staff and routine opera- 
tions of branches having staffs as large 
as 60 employees. His duties as Branch 
Manager encompassed responsibility for 
the credit and overall management of 
two different branches. 

In January 1942, his banking career 
was interrupted by World War II. Mr. 
Lynch served with The Royal Canadian 
Hussars, in Europe and rose to the rank 
of Captain. The Hussars originally a 
mounted regiment of the 17th Duke of 
York, became a Reconnaisance Regi- 
ment in 1939, and operated with the Third 
Canadian Division. 

In speaking of those years with the 
Hussars Mr. Lynch remarked, "They 
were some of the best years of my life/' 
As a Recon Regiment they were 
equipped with armored cars and small 
gun carrier trucks. It was their job to 



C. Lawrence Lynch 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 






go in^get the 'lay of the land'— and 
move f-a-s-t. 

In September of 1942, Mr. Lynch mar- 
ried the former Marion Hall. Three 
months later he was sent overseas. He 
spent two-and-one-half years In Europe 
based mainly iii England and is one of 
the men who went through D-Day and 
lived to tell the tale. Operation Overlord, 
the Allied Invasion of Europe began at 
precisely 15 minutes after midnight on 
June, 6, 1944. Tliis was the greatest 
armada the world had ever known. When 
queried as to the reactions of the men 
who participated in the D-Day invasion 
he answered, "There wasn't any par- 
ticular excitement. We had previously 
been trained so thoroughly in landing on 
beaches — wading in water up to our 
necks— that this was pretty much rou- 
tine. On D-Day we didn't know where 
we were really going until we were on 
board ship." At this time he held the 
rank of Lieutenant. 

Mr. Lynch was quite noncommittal 







Lt. C.« Lawrence Lynch, aboard ship at 
dawn, D-Day, enroute to the invasion. 



about that particular day. He became 
much more animated in telling about 
the Regiment's inspection by Generals 
Eisenhower and Montgomery— and the 
fact that they were inspected three times 
by the late King George. An amusing 
anecdote he remembered happened dur- 
ing an- inspection by the King. An Offi- 
cer marching in the extremely rigid 
fashion of the Hussars, tripped and fell 
flat on his face . . . just as he was pass- 
ing in review before King George. Mr. 
Lynch remarked with ready wit that he 
wished it had happened to him so he 
could have some claim to fame. 

But he does have a certain fame in 
light of the fact that the book "The 
Longest Day" which is the story of 
D-Day written by Cornelius Ryan, car- 
ries this notation on page 267— Lynch, 
C. Lawrence, Lt. (3rd Can. Div.) Bank 
Employee. His name is listed in the 
Canadian sector of D-Day Veterans as 
compiled in the back of the book. Mr. v 
Lynch didn't have, any idea he was listed 
among D-Day survivors until his name 
was pointed out to him by a friend. (The 
book is on the stands in a paperback 
edition.) 

Although^ he was fortunate enough to 
go through the D-Day invasion un- 
harmed he received a serious wound 
a short time later. In August of 1944, a 
piece of shrapnel entered his left lung 
right above' the heart. It was about the 
size of a fifty-cent piece and tolled the 
end of his active career in the Hussars. 
The incident happened in Falaise, 
France. Seriously wounded he was hos- 
pitalized there for about a month J 
shipped back to England for another 
four months hospitalization period; and * 
then finally home to Canada where he 
returned with_ the rank of Captain. . 
* Mr. Lynch returned to Royal Bank of 
Canada. But because he had developed 
a desire to live in a warmer climate, in 
January 1959 he journeyed to Florida. He 
took the trip by himself; liked what he 
saw; and returned in September of 1959 
with his wife and three daughters, 
Heather, Judith and Jennifer. The fam- 
ily first settled in Ft. Lauderdale and 
has sinced moved to the suburb of Plan- 
tation Park. 

Mr. Lynch entered our bank in Octo* 
(Continued on Page 8) 



DeMERLE HARPER, PANELIST 
AT NABW MEETING 

At the January dinner meeting of the Mi- 
ami Chapter, National Association of Bank 
Women held at the DuPont Plaza Hotel, De 
Merle L. Harper, Assistant Secretary, partici- 
pated in a panel discussion on Loans. 

Sharing honors with Miss Harper were 
Luba Marsh, Vice President, Commercial Bank 
of Miami, moderator; and Dorothy Eddleman, 
Assistant Cashier, The Hialeah-Miami Springs 
Bank. 

Marie Doland, Assistant Personnel Officer, 
First National Bank of Miami was program 
chairman of the meeting which was presided 
over by Virginia Smith, Assistant Vice Presi- 
dent, First National Bank of Homestead. 

Miss Harper, who is in charge of our Mortgage Loan Department, 
discussed her field and in particular Construction Loans. The question 
and answer period which followed proved so interesting and informative, it 
was decided to invite the panel to return at a later date so the subject 
could be explored in greater detail 

De Merle L. Harper has* been an Officer of Little River Bank and Trust 
Company, since 1955. Before coming to our bank in 1952, she was with 
Riverside Bank, Miami; and Florida National Bank of Key West. 




(Continued from Page 4) 
to Personnel . . . Judy Kaufmann, Re- 
turn Items to Sig. Control (finally) , , . 
Harry Lenard, Exchange to New Ac- 
counts . - . Wally Swentzel, Teller to 
Head Teller . . . Jean Barney, Block to. 
Return Items . . . Sally Broe, Check 
Imprinting to Bookkeeping . . . and 
Mary Jane Spahr is now a floater in 
Bookkeeping . . . Since Tom Doell went 
on a Wednesday and Friday schedule-^ 
it's Ed Herrschaft who is a now in the 
Stock Room . . . Welcome Back to 
Roberta Alberti, Secretary to Mr. Mor- 
lock, and to Jane Stone in Block . . . 
FUN is the password for Pauline and 
Howard MeElhaney who weekend at Key 
Colony Beach with Pauline's folks the 
John Gallian's of Mich. . . . Ina and Stan 
Claypool are to be commended. Ina is 
taking Typing, and Stan, Spanish at 
N. M. Hi. And that was Carl Schubert, 
Professor Emeritus, University of Illi- 

(Continued on Page 10) 



(Continued from Page 3) 
work successfully in the Block Depart- 
ment. One must not be easily flustered, 
and it is equally important not to be- 
come upset when the work piles up. 
Many people tend to "go to pieces" when 
the pressure starts. The department 
must function as a team, whose greatest 
asset is the ability to get along with each 
other, air. Fagan unhesitantly stresses 
the fact of cooperation within the depart- 
ment as of the essence, since the depart- 
ment must balance as a whole. 

This is comparatively easy for Rose, 
because she is genuinely interested in 
her work, and has a natural ability to 
function smoothly under pressure. Born 
in Philadelphia, she was formerly with 
Philadelphia National Bank, where she 
spent three years in the Block Dept. She 
is married to William, and has two chil- 
dren William Daniel 7, and Rose Ann 5. 

Rose lives in North Miami, and is a 
member of Holy Family Catholic Church, 
and Natural Bridge Elementary PTA. 
When asked about her hobbies, she an- 
swered, ''What with working at the bank 
and taking care of my family at home, 
I really don't have time for a hobby— 
but I do like to swim." 



BOARD PROMOTES NESS, 
BARAKET, AND WILSHEAR 




NESS 



BARAKET 



WILSHEAR 



At the January 1962, organization 
meeting of the Board of Directors, three 
Officers were advanced to positions of 
higher rank and authority. The promo- 
tions announced by James G. Garner, 
Chairman of the Board and President, 
are as follows: George S. Ness, Senior 
Vice President and Comptroller; William 
Baraket, Vice President and Trust Offi- 
cer; and John A. Wilshear, Jr., Secre- 
tary 1 and Treasurer. 

Mr. Ness, formerly Vice President and 
Comptroller has been in the banking 
field since 1929. Before' coming to our 
bank as Auditor in April 1950, he was 
with Chase Manhattan Bank of New 
York, which was formerly the Bank of 
the Manhattan Company. Mr. Ness will 
continue to serve as a member of the 
Executive Committee with Richard C. 
Boggs, Executive Vice President and 
Trust Officer; and Raymond E., Mor- 
lock, Senior Vice President. 

Mr. Baraket, is a graduate of Salmon 



P. Chase Law College, LLB f 1954. He 
has been in banking since 1950. Before 
coming to our Trust Department in July 
1956, he. was with First National Bank 
of Cincinnati. Mr. Baraket, formerly a 
Trust Officer, is participating in his 
final year of a three year Trust course 
at The Stonier Graduate School of Bank- 
ing, Rutgers University, N. J. In his 
new position he is now classified as a 
Senior Officer, and as such has been 
given the authority and the responsibili- 
ties accorded his title. 

Mr. Wilshear formerly an Assistant 
Vice President, came to our bank in 
April 1953, from Republic National Bank 
of Dallas. He has been in the banking 
field since 1941. Classified as a Senior 
Officer, his authority and responsibilities 
include the functions of Personnel and 
Operations Officer for our bank. Mr. 
Wilshear is in his final year of a three 
year course in Commercial Banking, at 
School of Banking of the South, Louisiana 
State University, Baton Rouge, La. 



^46^4 £» it $on, ty<M{ 




A fringe benefit whose value cannot be computed in dollars and cents, is 
tho opportunity to attend American Institute of Banking clashes. 

Aside from the fact that as an (employee of this bank you are eligible 1 
to atteifd classes, bur bank pays the cost of the tuition for all those who suc- 
cessfully complete courses, arid in addition membership for the year in the 
Miami Chapfer, A.I.B. 

The knowledge and understanding of the banking field that is to be gained — 
at no cost to you— is immeasurable. Co-workers participating in the Spring 
Semester are as follows: Pauline McElhaney, C. Lawrence Lynch, AT; William 
F. Duncan, AT, and Royce Decker. 

Those interested in learning more about this adult educational group may 
do so by contacting John A. Wilshear, Jr., Secretary and Treasurer, who is in 
charge of Personnel. 



Hefoft (leiikel . ♦ . 




John A. Wiishear, Jr., Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, presents 
John j, "Jack" Regan, right, 
with a gift from "Checkmates" 
on the day of his retirement. 
Mr. Regan, formerly with the 
Glenridge, N. J, Police Dept. 
1926-1953, served as a guard in 
our bank since 1955. A familiar 
figure in our main lobby, Jack 
is missed by customers as well 
as personnel. Extending our 
best wishes for his continued 
health and prosperity are left: 
Bobbi Sutton, Sandy Sarhan. 
Cliff Locke, Jean Sistrunk, and 
William J. Jtfooney, Auditor. 



PROGRESS 

Co-workers Richard G. Swan, 
Forrest W. Nielsen, and Mrs. Betty 
H. Hamilton, have achieved ad- 
vancement in recognition of their 
contributions to the bank and 
in particular, their respective 
departments. 

Swan and Nielsen have been 
reclassified as Executive Em- 
ployees. They are employed in 
the Trust Department, which is 
under the direction of Richard C. 
Boggs, Executive Vice Preident 
and Trust Officer. 

Mrs. Hamilton, formerly secre- 
tary to Bernard E. Boldin, Vice 
President, and to the Loan De- 
partment; is now classified a 
Department Head. As such she 
is responsible for operation of the 
Loan cage, under the direction of 
Cadwalader Woodville, Jr., Vice 
President. 



(Continued from Page 5) 
ber, 1959, Assigned to the Comptroller's 
Department lie worked there and In the 
New Accounts Department, In order to 
become familiarized with American 
banking procedures. In April of 19G0 ho 



was appointed an Assistant Treasurer. 
Included in his duties is responsibility 
for the Regular and Commercial Check- 
ing Ledgers in our Bookkeeping Depart* 
ment. 




Captain Lynch, in England 

Mr. Lynch is a member of the Offi- 
cers' Mess, Royal Canadian Hussars for 
which he served as Treasurer; was sec- 
retary of Rotary Club of Verdun, Mon- 
treal; a member of Beaconsfield Golf 
Club; Miami Shores Men's Club; Ameri- 
can Institute of Banking, and Canadian 
Club of Ft. Lauderdale. 



8 



THE WELCOME MAT 



HARVEY KAPLAN— Block , . . Originally from 
Rtverdale. N, Y. Worked at First Federal in 
Cocoa, Fla., and First National of Miami, Froof 
Dept* Harvey is married to Marie; attends the 
Unitarian Church: likes sailing* and hopes to 
own another 16 It. sloop* 



HILDA KELLEIfc— Block , . . Call her "Bobbie." 
Formerly with Fanntn State Bank, Houston, 
Texas for 10 years, and Coconut Grove Bank, 6 
years, as supervisor of Proof* Attends S(, Ste- 
phen's Episcopal Church: has two sons, Fred, 10, 
and John, 18, a Seaman, USN. 



ROBERT MARRIE — Block , A A Before coming 
to our bank worked in the Block Departments at 
Mercantile National, and First National of Miami. 
Was a professional fighter, participated in Golden- 
Gloves Tournaments Lightweight Class.. Had 10 
pro fights and lost one* Fought in Miami Beach 
Auditorium, and at kake Worth. Attended 
Youngstown University, Ohio, majored in Edu- 
cation. Bob is from Sharpsville, Pa.; is married 
to Jacqueline; attends St. Mary's Catholic Church, 



NELLIE SLAUTEIi— Teller - . , A Teller, with 
First National Bank of Stuart. Nellie came to 
Miami because of her husband's profession. WaK 
ter "is a teacher at Miami Edison High School. 
Attends Wagg Memorial Methodist Church In 
West Palm Beach, where they spend weekends. 
Likes gardening and bridge. 



ROYCE DECKER— Exchange ... - - Retired after 
20 years with the H.S.^ Navy, as Chief Petty 
Officer* Aviation Machinist Mate* Stationed in 
Hawaii, Royce was in charge of Radio Control 
Target Plane Meter. Formerly a Teller at Chase 
Federal, Is married to ARhea: has a son Royce. 
Jr., 0. Attends Church of the Master; is on our 
"Delinquents 1 ' Bowling Team; likes fishing. 



JAKK ROBERTS — Guard . , «. After ZQ years 
with the USAF retired as a M/Sgt., Originally 
from Georgia, lived here previous to entering the 
service. Is a member of BPOE Victorville Lodge. 
JLS77, California, where he was based., Intends 
to transfer to a local lodge. Is married to Mar- 
garet, and has a daughter Kathy 15, who attcn&s 
Miami Edison Junior HI. 



CLARA^CRUCK— Secretary to-Mrj-Bolduv. . « A- 
graduate of North Miami High School class of 
'5(5. Clara worked locally as a legal stenographer. 
She has a son Jeffrey 3: and is a member of the 
Holy Family Catholic Church choir. Likes singl- 
ing, and has sung at local dances and weddings. 



BEVERLY HART— Loan . ., , Has been; in Miami 
for about two years, did Bookkeeping locally, 
Formerly from Evansville, Ind. where she worked^ 
in a Loan Co. Beverly has a son Ranee, 5: con* 
sidere cooking a hobby I "loves" going to the 
beach. 



JACQUELINE BANG— Loan « * , Jacqueline * has 
a small loans background of years in Jackson- 
ville, Came from Cumberland, Md, where she 
worked in the Loan Dept. of Liberty Trust Bank. 
Is married to Theodore. Likes water skiing and 
boating. 



JUNE MASTERS— Loan . , . Formerly with the 
Bank of America, Burbank, California where she 
worked in the Loan Dept. June has a daughter 
Cynthia Lee, 3 months: Attends Miami Shores 
Community Church; is married to Kelly Masters, 
Jr, who performed on stage and in pictures in 
Hollywood, Participates in Gallery Playhouse pro* 
diictions. Father-in-law Kelly Masters, Sr., writes 
youth books for boys under the, pseudonym 
Zachary Ball. A successful writer, he recently 
sold "Bristle Face*' to Walt Disney, which is to 
be filmed soon. 



MILDRED GRAZIANO— Secretary to Mr** Graham 
, v „ Formerly a resident of Queens, I/.I., N.Y. 
Mildred has a background of general office work. 
Attends St. James Catholic: Church; has a 'grand- 
son Stephen 3; plays the piano. Enjoys sewing, 
especially draperies and slip covers. 



KOBKRT CLARK — Teller * * , Born In Miamf. is 
a graduate of Coral Gables Hi. Spent two Vears 
in the >Iarine Corps. Worked as a Teller for 
Citizen's National Bank oi Los Angeles; and 
Bank of South Miami ^ Attends Perrino Baptist 
Church; likes stereo, reading, and swimming. 



KUGENIA GALLUB — Bookkeeping . . . Before 
coming to our bank was with Miami National 
in Safe Deposit. Formerly from Chicago: attends 
St. Mary's Catholic Church: is fond of swim- 
ming. 



ROBKRT BOYER — Trust ... A graduate of South 
Broward High School. Bob Is taking night courses 
at University of Miami in order to get degree in 
Business Administration. Before coming hero did 
general office work- Is originally from Indian* 
apolis. Ind. Attends First Presbyterian Church 
of Homestead; likes water sports and fishing. Is 
married to Lillian, and is eagerly anticipating 
their first child in the near future. 



GYPSY KELLY — Trust . . .Comes from Garden 
City. L.-Li-has a -son- Jeff, 18; attends*SU -Thomas 
Episcopal Church/ South Miami. Gypsy loves 
horses and dogs. Owns a mare, "Gun Smoke** 
and is a member of Western Horse Show Associa* 
tion. A fox hunt enthusiast she has lier own 
hounds, three of them which she keeps at home, 

SOPHIA SOFIELD — Trust and Mortage Loan De* 
partments . , . Originally from New York City. Win* 
ter vacations in Florida helped Sophia and hus- 
band Howard decide to make their home liere. 
Did secretarial work locally; attends Sellers Meth-. 
odist Church: likes gardening and fishing. 



cdfahibtXj jBbitkdaij to Hjou 



ft[b jjIjj' i ^JP 



APRIL 

1 



ltif*snm*t\_*%* 



i*itv>Omtw*i 



*MiiH**UJl 



Ina Claypool— Bookkeeping 

Martha Ramey— Switchboard ., 

Joan Jones-^BIock „ ,-, 

Douglas R. Bell— Trust Officer , 

June Brown- 
Secretary to Miss Harper ,„,„.., 

Virginia Asbury— Bookkeeping , 

Dolores Matthews— Bookkeeping 

.Cadwalader Woodville, Jr. — 
Vice President .„* **..,„,„.„„ 

Dorothy Wallace- 
Secretary to Mr. Bartlett „..<„,♦.* 19 

Elsie Wear— Teller >,.„.„ „.«,*-.,.,„..„ 24 



. 9 
.13 
.14 



*rnjt>|inTfj, 



14 



Walter Donahue— Parking Lot „",„".*..-.». '26 

Arthur Oliver— Parking Lot ,„ ,„ 26 

Eugenia Gallub— Bookkeeping >„«„< « 30 

MAY 

Frank Vecchione^r 
Coin Wrapping Teller „ . 4 

Mae Teubner— Teller a,,,,.,,..,^....** 6 

Hilda, Keller— Block „„,.„<* \ 7 

Betty Hamilton— Loan ..„*...«.«„„„«„.»«. J.2 
DeMerle L. Harper— 

Assistant Secretary ,..*..,* * * 12 

Harvey Draughon— Guard *..,„-.-*.„ „.„, 24 

Katie Sweat— Teller _,„,„ , 2T 

Carolyn Shields— Bookkeeping 29 



Ji| § xTTrrTTTj rj^ZIIJl 



(Continued from Page 6) 
nois who recently* visited with them . . . 
Mighty proud is Olga Burgos of husband 
Ralph who is taking a pre med course 
at Dade Jr. College . . . "Bright" is the 
word for Dan Northop's (VP) new red, 
hardtop Chevy . . . It's a Chevy too for 
Elsie and Jack Wear , . . And a white 
Falcon for Kate Nelson . . , All of 52 
relatives and guests attended the party 
to wish Leroy Stebbins a Happy 43rd 
Birthday . . . Friends gathered too, at 
Winnie Maxson's to welcome her daugh- 
ter-in-law Avolone, Jim's wife . . . Only 
one of three to receive a Citation for 
Perfect Attendance is George Bourbcau, 
(AT) member Edison Nites Lion's Club 
. . . And that hard*worker dishing out 
the barbecued chicken in Line #1, was 
Douglas R, Bell (TO), for the Miami 
Shores Kiwanis Club . . . Pleased is Earl 
Helfman with intensified training pro- 



gram so he'll have all the answers when 
he calls on our customers via Bus. De- 
velopment. And isn't that a lovely Green 
Chevy he has? . . . Just fine now is 
Betty Anne, daughter of the E. M. Gra- 
ham's (VP), who was home for a brief 
illness. And house guest of the Graham's 
is Mrs. Seba Whitehead from Ashville, 
N. C. . . , MORE VISITORS— Bettye 
Neal's mother, Mrs. Helen Tompkins 
from St. Thomas, V. I. . . . Miriam 
White's mother, Mrs. Charles Lowmari 
and aunt, Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, from 
N. J. . . . Wally and Jerry Swentzel's 
folks the Larry Kreutzers, Bronx, N. Y. 
. . . and just about everybody from N. Y. 
and N. J. visit Jo and Charlie Snyder 
. . . Sincerely Hope Ceil Rose is now 
back after recent operation at N. W. 
Hospital ■ . . and that was a Tonsillec- 
tomy for Carol Berger who timed her 
(Continued on Page 11) 



10 



/ff 



Baraket, Guest Speaker at Kiwanis Luncheon 



At the February 14 meeting 
of the Biscayne ±Jay Kiwanis 
Club, William Baraket, Vice 




Mr. Boldin, left, congratulates Mr. Baraket 
shown with the Certificate of Appreciation 
presented him by Biscayne Bay Kiwanis 
Club, for his excellent talk; 



President and Trust Officer; 
spoke on "Wills and Marital 
Deductions". 

Bernard E. Boldin, program 
chairman for the meeting, and 
Vice President of our bank was 
responsible for Mr. Baraket's 
appearance. Mr. Boldin re- 
marked on the excellent recep- 
tion of the talk and said, "At 
the conclusion of. the meeting 
we both received many fine 
compliments on the program as 
it presented a personal problem 
about which all are deeply 
concerned." 

The excellent attendance in- 
cluded members from the* Air- 
port, North Miami, Northside, 
arid Miami Beach Kiwanis Clubs. 
Among the prominent guests 
were^ — Edward* F. Boardman, 
U. S. District Attorney; and 
"Chuck" Hall, Dade County 
Commissioner. 



PROFIT SHARING APEX 
IN VIEW FOR 13 




r- 



Thirteen out of a total of 61 co-workers 
participating in the Profit Sharing Plan 
as of the end of 1961, have 90% of their 
share vested. This means that at the end 
of 1962, these 13 people are entitled to a 
100% value of their share in the fund, 
which they will receive at the termina- 
tion of their status as employees of our 
bank. 

Announcement of this fact was made 
at a recent meeting conducted by Rich* 
ard O. Boggs, Executive Vice President 
and Trust Officer; and George S. Ness, 
Senior Vice President and Comptroller, 

Profiting Sharing— one of our many 
Fringe Benefits=Is high on the list of 
advantages to be gained by being an 
employee of our bank. The purpose of 
the plan is to provide retirement benefits 
to employees under a formula keyed to 
the profits of the bank; and to give 
recognition to those who .remain here 



and devote their efforts to* promote its 
success* 

All^Officers and Personnel who have 
been with our bank for three consecutive 
years on December 31st of any year, are 
eligible to participate. The fund is ad- 
ministered by the Trust Department, for 
the benefit of all concerned. 



(Continued from Page 10) 
return from Jackson, for her birthday 
. . . Disappointed were Betty and Joe 
Krutzer (avid stock car fans} to have 
missed seeing son Bill race at Daytona 
Beach , ., .. Mighty Handsome Foursome 
on the Shores Golf course recently was 
Harley G. Collins, Director; George S. 
Ness, Sr. VP and Comptroller; Edwin 
M. Graham, VP; and Harvey Draughon 
y , .. And ,a Happy St. Patrick's Day to 
you. too! \ 



11 



*PenMMa£tty Sfeea&iaf 



o • 




Did you ever have a spell of wondering about this and that, and the why and how 
of things? Of course you have. I do too. Like the other day when I got to 
wondering about how come Nazism and Fascism is crawling out of the wood- 
work. You know it is — you read too. 

Swastikas have been smeared on buildings and articles have appeared explaining 
that Hitler and Mussolini were not Communists, While I do not pretend to 
catch the significance of all this "explaining", I cannot help but think — if "H" 
and M M" wern't Communists, so what! What does that make them? Good guys? 

On the other hand, I cannot help but wonder whether or not this isn't just a 
smokescreen to try to take the heat off Communism. I do not know the answer to 
that, but of this I am convinced . . . since a rose by another name smells as sweet 
— then Communism by any other name — is as malodorous. 

I am concerned about these things because I wonder too, if it could be another 
way to promote thinking along the line that our American Society is "rotting at 
the core". If you will recall, this was attempted during the Korean War when 
some American GFs were brainwashed in prison camps by Chinese Communists, 
while others defected. The stories that emananted during that period were 
magnified by persons who wanted to establish our society as decadent. 

The facts came out, at the Stennis subcommittee hearing* in Washington as told by 
Gen. Frederick H. Smith, Vice Chief of Staff of the Air Force, who said, "During 
the Korean War, more than 7,000 Americans were captured. After repatriation, 
and after all the facts were 'studied on the cases suspected of collaboration, mis- 
behavior and the like, 14 were brought to trial and 11 were convicted. These 11, 
plus the 21 who refused to.return, add up to less than two- tenths of one percent 
of those who were capture^ At the same time, more than 87,500 of our service- 
men in Korea got awards for exemplary conduct and 79 got the Medal of Honor. 
Thousands of the captured died as heroes". 

It is unthinkable that a few rebellious young men reflected the "core" of our society 
at that time. It is just as inconceivable that the appearance of a Swastika or the 
spoutings of a Red propagandist, reflects America today. 

We as a nation are firm in national purpose. As 
individuals we can be justifiably proud of our 
country, and should reflect that pride thru 
unfaltering faith in ourselves, and The Almighty. 




35 




ectt*6 OF 



OUTSTANDING SERVICE 




. J 



--*// 




o ♦ ♦ 



NOTE 












:j 



LITTLE RIVER BANK and TRUST COMPANY 



8017 NORTHEAST 2nd AVENUE 



MIAMI, FLORIDA 



W 



6?2~Jti><i-a!?-^9<>7 



BANK... A Contents 
NOTES ™ 

About the Cover ............... .... 2 

Vo1 - 5 Na3 Feature Story ...> ,. 3 

. . . Dedicated to Progress . . .Through Have You Heard ...,. 4 

Mutual Understanding and Apprecia- 
tion for each other. Man Behind the Title ................4-5 

■Picnic .,.»,..,..... »....,.,. , 6-7 

ADVISORY BOARD 

DANIEL C. NORTHROP Ha PPy Birthday to You 9 

Vice President 

Progress* 9 

EDWIN M. GRAHAM 
Vice President 

A.I.B. Award 8 

• • • * 

What's In It For Us? ,...,.,10 

EDITOR 

The Welcome Mat 11 

LYNN D. BROWNE 

* * * * Personally Speaking ....Back Cover 

STAFF <<&*&> 

Virginia Asbury 

Lorraine Aufford ,_.,._ _,,_ --...__ 

ABOUT THE COVER • • • 

Judith Kaufmann 

„ m . "Cover Girl" for this issue is Doro- 

Mae Teubner 

thy E. Madsen, secretary to Jame; 
oro y ace ^ Garner, Chairman of the Board 

and President. Read her story 

starting on page 3. 

ea ^|P L ^|f J PHOTO CREDIT . • . 

m i « A » .j » j . i .». . ■ .• ... for pictures of "Checkmates" 

Member South Florida Industrial Editors Association r 

southern Council Edit™ Association Picnic, by Judy Kaufmann. "Bank 

International Council of Industrial Editors ' 

Notes" staffer. 

2 




Dot Madsen Says, "Working for 
Mr. Garner Is a Real Challenge" 



I wonder what it's like to bo James G. 
Garner's Secretary? ... is a ques- 
tion that has very likely crossed the 
minds of most of us at one time or 
another. To get the answer, we went to 
his secretary Dorothy E. Madsen. Dot 
thought for a moment then said. "Work- 
ing for Mr. Garner, is a real challenge. 
His mind works at such a sure and fast 
pace, that trying to keep up with him is 
a rather exhilarating experience. I find 
myself trying to anticipate his needs, 
and doing my best to supply him with 
the necessary data for the many im- 
portant transactions he handles. He 
keeps you mentally alert at all times, 
but I like that. I also find Mr. Garner 
to be thoughtful and considerate, and am „ 
really quite content to be his secretary." 

Watching Dot Madsen in action is an 
education in itself. As secretary to James 
G. Garner, Chairman of the Board and 
President, she must be and is, efficient 
and capable. If you happen to be waiting 
your turn to see Mr. Garner, you cannot 
help but observe Dot at her desk which 
occupies an area in our Trust Depart- 
ment.. Although she probably doesn't 
realize it, she has the ability to use a 
minimum amount of waste motion. She 
goes from one task to another with a 
sureness that comes from know-how and 
concentration. Her manner on the phone 
is the essence of courtesy and considera- 
tion whether it is a director of our bank, 
or a query from personnel. Although her 
work is constantly interrupted by the 
many people who wish to see and speak 
to our President, yet, when a soft spoken 
"Dorothy" issues from the private oU 
fice . . . she is immediately aware that 
Mr. Garner wants her attention. And he 
gets it. 

Our President doesn't have time to ex- 
plain each and every detail to his 
secretary. With Dorothy, he doesn't have 
to. A phrase— a short sentence from him 
— and she knows exactly what he wants, 
and how he wants it. 

Dot has a remarkable faculty for 
remembering phone numbers, which in 
itself is a tremendous asset to being a 
good secretary. It is not at all unusual 
to see her get one person after another 



on the phone at Mr. Garner's request, 
without referring to a book. 

When you talk with Dot Madsen, you 
realize that she is the type of person 
who knows what she is talking about, 
and that she gets facts straight. She 
speaks with authority because she not 
only knows what she is doing . . . but 
why . . . and what happens to it after it 
leaves her desk. 

Dorothy Madsen is a confident person. 
She has to be in the position she holds. 
But her confidence and capability is no 
mere accident or the complete outcome 
of job familarity. True, familiarity does 
aid a person in being efficient at their 
job. There is no arguing that point. But 
in Dot's case, there is an additional 
"something" which is probably due to 
the fact that this young lady has a mind 
like a "steel trap." What she learns she 
retains, and this is invaluable for Mr, 
Garner's needs, since he too has an 
amazing faculty for remembering de- 
tails. This results in a high-geared, 
smooth working relationship. 

In addition to handling many of Mr. 
Garner's loans and doing the minutes 
of the Finance Committee, her duties 
are many and so varied, that she never 
knows what she may be called on to do. 
To state in detail the actual functions 
of her job is impossible, because a great 
deal of it, is. of a highly confidential and 
personal nature, 

A fair-minded person, Dot Madsen 
makes it a point not to "play favorites" 
of those who wish to see Mr. Garner., 
Because. he is a busy man, it isn't always 
possible to see him when you want to. 
As Dot puts it, "Believe it or not, there 
are actually days when even I cannot 
get to see him." 

It is obvious that Dot Madsen has the 
qualities necessary to be secretary to 
our President. She is well-dressed, well- 
groomed, poised and confident. She has 
a fine sense of the right thing to do and 
say which is a wonderful asset for the 
public relations aspect of her job. 

Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, she grad- 
uated from the University of Minnesota, 
Phi Beta Kappa. Her social sorority is 
Zeta Tau Alpha. She majored in French 
and History, and has almost a complete 
major in business . Jfror about five years 
(Continued on Page 8) 



have you heard.. 

Spring is a time for newness— new 
leaves, new blooms, new babies, and 
new Grandmothers. Delighted was Mary 
Forestiere with new granddaughter Joan 
Cain (She's„Mary's 16th grandchild)— 
Maribel Neville with granddaughter 
Cjynthla Robin Jenest— Betty Krutzer 
with grandson, Barry Kelly Hess— and 
Katharine Evers with grandson, Joseph 
Craig Wcirick - . . Not to be outdone, it 
was a boy for Bob and Lillian Boyer, 
born on St. Pat's Day and named 
Robert Patrick (what else?) . . . October 
is the month Jean and Dee Barney are 
expecting their second child . . . While 
last but still important are the 5 puppies 
Katharine Ever's dog "Blondie" had— 
and the 6 born to "Pety," June Brown's 
dachshund . , , CONGRATULATIONS 
AND BEST WISHES — Thirty-Seventh 
Anniversary Greetings to Vivian and 
Winficld La Porte , , . It's the 21st Wed- 
ding Anniversary for Virginia and 
"Woody" Asbury. (Weren't those yellow 
roses he sent her out-of-this-world beau- 
tiful!) , , , It's the Third Wedding An- 
niversary for Katharine and Paul Evers 
. . . and the First, for Barbara and 
Larry Smith who dinner-dated with 
Sammie and Alan Tait . . . February '63 
is the Wedding Month chosen by Sally 
Broe and Jim Whitton who recently An- 
nounced their Engagement « . . Welcome 
Back to Joyce Varner, Fred Fiddes and 
Ernie Azula . . . Most becoming is Sam- 
mie Tait's short hair do . . . It's good 
to know that the auto accident Clara 
Cruce and son Jeffrey were in wasn't as 
bad as it could have been . . . Busy is 
Irene Renn with filly "Babet" and Obe- 
dience School Collies, Prince, Princess, 
and their daughter Bridget . . . Delighted 
is Mae Teubner who "finally" bowled a 
,209 . . . "The Winnah" is Bob (Light- 
weight Class) Marrie, who just won 2 
more fights. This totals 17 out r of 20 for 
him. He fought Jimmy Hightower at 
Little River Aud, winning a 6 round 
decision both times . . . l^Ierle Harper's 
most real love is adorable white kitten 
(Continued on Page 11) 



■«-\\& 






V 



• • 



n This will probably be the shortest 
story of its kind in this series, because 
I really havenH done anything of 
interest," said William Joseph Mooney, 
Auditor, as he sat down to be inter- 
viewed for his U MBT" writeup. But if 
being a conscientious and ambitious 
young man, successful in career and 
home life isn't of interest, then there 
is something wrong with our sense of 
values. 

One of three sons, Mr, Mooney was 
born, in Philadelphia, Pa. on January 8, 
1930. In 1945, he came to Miami with 
his folks and attended St. Mary's from 
which he graduated in 1948. (St. Mary's 
was still a High School at that time.) 

Following his graduation Mr, Mooney 
attended the University of Miami where 
he majored in Accounting ; and the Walsh 
School of Business Science, where he 
continued his studies. The ambition 
which was to culminate in Mr. Mooney's 
.present day success was evident at an 
early age. During the last .three years 
of high school and while he attended the 
University and the Business School, he 
also worked in a grocery store on Satur- 
days and during vacations. Looking back 
on that time Mr. Mooney remarked, 
"At one time or another, I did just about 
everything in that store." 

On completing his schooling he worked 
for several months at the Miami Herald, 
until he came to our bank on April 16, 
1951. For the first few months he was 
in the Addressograph-Mail Department, 
and also worked as a Coin Teller. But 
then, as he states 'The luckiest break 
I had in the bank was the day George S. 
Ness, Senior Vice President and Comp- 
troller, called me into his office and 
asked me if I would be interested in 



^ 



. . . William J. Mooney 



AUDITOR 




transferring to the Auditing Depart- 
ment." He "naturally 'jumped' at the 
chance," and has .been in that depart- 
ment since that time- 
Conscientious application eventually 
led to his being elected Assistant Auditor 
in January i960, and in January 1961 he 
became Auditor. 

"Auditing," states Mr. Mooney, "is 
fundamentally a process of verification 
that falls into five general classifica- 
tions: Assets, Liabilities, Income, Ex- 
pense and Net Worth. The maintenance 
of an adequate auditing program is gen- 
erally recognized as an important part of 
bank operations." 

One of the factors that helped Mr. 
Mooney to attain his success was Ameri- 
can Institute of Banking study courses. 
Mr. Mooney completed Principles of 
Bank Operations, Commercial Law, and 







Mr. and Mrs. Mooney with their 
three children, Patty 4, Timmy 18 
months, and Billy 6. 



Negotiable Instruments. In addition to 
the advantages of the knowledge he 
gained by taking these courses, they 
helped to give him an understanding of 
the banking field. This was important in 
his work because Auditing eventually 
touches every department throughout the 
bank. 

A. I. B. also played an important role 
in his personal life. It was while he was 
attending classes that the attractive 
Connie Campanalla, at that time a sec- 
retary in our Trust Department, needed 
transportation to get to and from her 
classes. Mr. Mooney "obliged." In 1954 
they were married at St. Rose of Lima 
Church. The Mooney's have three chil- 
dren, Billy 6, Patty 4, and Timmy about 
18 months. They have their own home in 
Biscayne Gardens, which they are pres- 
ently adding to, and are members of St. 
James Catholic Church. 

Mr. Mooney is a past-President of 
"Checkmates," our Social and Service 
club. He is a member of Miami Shores 
Men's Club; Miami Chapter, American 
Institute of Banking, and National Asso- 
ciation for Bank Audit Control and 
Operation (more familiarly known as 
NABAC). He was recently honored by 
being nominated to serve on the Board 
of Directors for NABAC, and for the 
National Convention scheduled to be 
held at Miami Beach in October, Mr. 
Mooney has been asked to be on the 
Exhibits Committee. 

When asked if he felt there was much 
opportunity in the banking field for young 
men today Mr. Mooney answered, "Cer- 
tainly., I cannot help but feel that there 
is.. However, I must admit that in my 
case, a great deal of my present success 
is due to Mr. Ness, who gave me every 
(Continued on Page 8) 




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Duncan Receives A.I.B. Certificate 



NMUJlliliHjpjJUin.i I lli.il 







Wiiiiam F. Duncan, Assistant 
Treasurer of our bank, right, 
is shown receiving his Pre- 
Standard Certificate for at- 
tending American Institute 
of Banking classes. The pre- 
sentation was made by 
Arthur Lundeen, President, 
Coral Gables First National 
Bank. The event took place 
at the Annual Awards Din- 
ner of A.I.B., held at the 
Du Pont Plaza Hotel, May 5. 
3uj\ Duncan, a firm believer 
in the benefits, derived from 
attending these classes urges 
everyone to take advantage 
of this opportunity for spe- 
cialized instruction in the 
banking field. 



y 



(Continued from Page 5) 
opportunity to learn, and for whom I 
have a great deal of respect and admira- 
tion. I really owe him a lot." 



(Continued From Page 3) 
following graduation, she worked at 
Punch, Edye and Co. (Steamship Agents 
and Ship Brokers), Her job dealt prin- 
cipally with rates which were based on 
poundage, cubic footage, etcetera. Highly 
technical, it called for keen analysis and 
thorough knowledge of many facets of 
shipping. Dot found this work fascinat- 
ing, but because of her capabilities she 
was eventually persuaded to go into 
business for herself. 

From 1953 to 1956 she was a partner 
in the Downtown Office Service, with 
offices in the downtown business district 
(Continued on Page 10) 




n iin Sidfru in rWwrf'whTN 



Mr. Mooney as a grocery store 
clerk, age 16. 



Hflppy BiRTHDfly io you 



£# 



" TJjKJ J3'JJ J ^' j? 1jj j 



JUNE* 



• rtjt*r*t»j* + 



»i«n^w» 



Jo Ann Broda— Bookkeeping ,„ 
Wally Swentzel— Head Teller., 
Howard Barr— Teller ^»«*.„„„. 
Dorothy Sweeney— Bookkeeping .., 
William Baraket— 

Vice President and Trust Officer V, 7 
Yolanda Cappolino~Bookkeeping „ w «, 9 

Joseph Hinson~Parking Lot „, 9 

Phyllis Magruder— ~ 

Secretary to Mr. Duncan „„^^«^, 13 
Katharine Evers— Cafeteria o.,..,,,,,™™ 15 
June Masters—Loan ^„ 1 „^„ 4 „o W » WJ r*»««« 16 
Louis V. BartletW 

Assistant Trust Officer w , ,„ VM , 1MB< 17 

Mildred Graziano— , 

Secretary to Mr. Graham ^. wo .„ 25 

Helen Vitkauskas— Bookkeeping ,„ T , V w 27 
Daniel C. Northrop-?-Vice Presidents, 30 



JULY 

Joel Swanson— Addressograph-Maii .„.- 2 

Eunice Karlson— Relief Stenographer 5 

Gerda Shwetzer— 
Secretary to Mr. Baraket ,„.„.„...<...«. 5 

Walter W. . Asmus— Vice President ,., w 10 

William F. Duncans- 
Assistant Treasurer „ w »,,.»<.» J ,. w ««. k »» 11 

Robert Boyer— Trust „ ._.„..„„ «„.„-. 16 

Helene Candullo— Bookkeeping ,„„.„.„. 23 

Sandra Pfeiffer^Bookkeeping ,„^.. v „„ 24 

Pauline McElhaney^- 

Secretary to Mr., Woodville ,, , ^ 25 

Earl Helfman— 
Assistant to Mr., Graham w „„.„, w ... 26 

Joan Smith—Safe Deposit >, M « U » MJ ,« M . V >,«» 28 



l i^ fT/Tf J IJ.J rjUifP 



progress 



Opportunity for advancement "knocks 
again" in our Trust Department, which 
continues to look ahead to the future. 

In line with this policy, Dorothy Wal- 
lace -will* join~Dick. ,S\van f in .taking, a 
week of lectures on Trust and Estate 
Planning, at the University of Florida 
in June. 

This is the final year for Swan, who 
will complete a three year period of 
one-week lectures at the University. 
Dick, who also completed Trust I, an 
American Institute of Banking course, 
formerly attended the University of 
Florida for three years. He majored in 



Accounting and Business Administration. 
He was recently re-classified as an Exe- 
cutive Employee of our bank. 

Dorothy completed several American 
Institute of Banking courses as follows: 
Trust I, Trust II, and ^Negotiable Instru- 
ments. She is a graduate of Rider Col- 
lege,. Trenton, _N._J.^ where she took a 
two year Secretarial Course. 

As stated by Richard C. Boggs, Exe- 
cutive Vice 'President and Trust Officer, 
"The objective of sending people to 
Gainesville, is to provide increased 
training and know-how for employees 
who are making excellent progress in 
their work, ,so they niay take greater 
advantage of opportunities for advance- 
ment in the 'Trust Department." 




what's in it 
for us? 



80% of all Hospital ancl'Surgicarex- 
penses up to $10,000 are paid for us 
under the terms of the Insurance Policy 
our bank gives us. 

For minor expenditures such as Prescrip- 
tions and Doctor's visits we pay the 
first $50. After that — 80% of all 
costs — up to $10,000 are covered 
by our insurance- 

It is important to remember . . . that 
we do NOT contribute to the cost of 
the Policy. This is PAID IN FULL for 
us, by our bank. 

In times of stress and strain, dollars 
and cents cannot possibly compensate 
for the peace of mind we derive from 
a Fringe Benefit such as this. 



(Continued from Page 8) 
of St. Louis. As a Public Stenographer, 
she acquired a vast background of the 
business world. Her work touched many 
fields of business and industry as she 
worked with people who dealt in Indus- 
trial Lifts, Elevators, Printing, Litho- 
graphy, and many others. In addition 
there were CPA's Lawyers, Dentists, 
Architects, Insurance men, and there 



was even a man who was working on 
plans for a space station, which seemed 
"odd at that time, but not so funny now." 

She sold her partnership when her 
family moved to Tampa, where she 
worked in a law office for two years 
before coming to Miami. She now resides 
in EI Portal, with her mother and sister. 

'Dot began* working at .our bank on 
January 19, 1959, as Secretary to Ber* 
nard E. Boldin, Vice President. Approxi- 
mately three months later, she was 
transferred on a temporary basis to be 
secretary to Mr- Garner. She lias a geti^ 
uine glint of humor in her eyes as she 
states, "I still am not absolutely certain 
if I'm on a temporary basis or not, since 
nothing definite has ever been said about 
my status/ 1 

In addition to her background and 
ability, Dot has the mark of the truly 
intelligent person. As efficient as she is, 
she still honestly feels there is "always 
so much more to learn." She admittedly 
has a high regard for Mr, Garner's 
business acumen, and appreciates the 
fact that he takes time to explain things. 
In doing so, it gives her "a wonderful 
opportunity to become familiar with 
many worthwhile facts." 

To sum up her viewpoint of her posi- 
tion she states, "This job is what you 
make it. It can be routine if you do it 
that way. But if you delve into * . s ques- 
tion # . , and justify through research , # . 
it becomes absolutely fascinating. With 
a basis of understanding you can then 
talk over various aspects in an intelli- 
gent manner with Mr.' Garner, and con- 
tinue to gain knowledge." 

There was a smart man who once said 
something like this, "He who graduates 
yesterday, and stops learning today, is 
uneducated tomorrow." It is obvious that 
this does not pertain to, Dorothy E. 
Madsen, 



< 



10 



(Continued from Page 4) 
"Minnie' > who permits Merle to share 
the new apartment . ■ . Delighted are 
the Richard C. Boggs' (Exec VP & TO) 
.with their boat the "Frandick" and their 
European tour . . . It's a new home for 
Jake and Margaret Roberts with plenty 
of room to display the marble Jake 
brought back from Spain ... On leave 
was Carol Berger^s .brother - f'Bud" 
(Machinist Mate) from Boot Camp be- 
fore going to the Great Lakes . . - 
Jeff Kelly, Gypsy's son is now with 
the Airborne Paratroopers at Ft. 
Jackson, S. C. awaiting transfer . . . 
COMINGS AND GOINGS— Sara Kulok to 
Key West . . . Gloria and Oren Signor 
with the Ted Schoenings of NJ to Nas- 
sau . . . Welcome to Dorothy Strbyviis, 
back and GLAD to be, from South Viet- 
nam where her husband is stationed . . . 
Yvonne Henderson from Tallahassee , ., . 
Mrs. Edwin M. Graham from Lake Wales 
for the Passion Play ... the Ray E. 
Morlock's (Sr VP) from Sanabel Island 
for fishing where he injured his hand 
trying to free the boat's motor from a 
sand bar and had to return home 
... Ft, Meyers for Vivian La Porte 
and husband, Winjfield . . . and it's a 
fishing trip (again?) planned by Gladys 
and Fred Haldy . /.VISITORS IN- 
CLUDE^-Leslie, brother of Dot Wallace's 
husband George, from New Orleans . . . 
Royce Decker's sister Mrs, Jack Kohl 
and husband from Ripon, Wise, enroute 
to the ^Bahamas . . . All the way from 
Montreal came Gerry Bouchard's cou- 
sins Mrs. Rich's and Miss Grant . . . 
Sandy and Ralph Burgos hosted for 
Ralph's folks, Dr. and Mrs. Rafael 
Burgos-Mascias of Puerto Rico . . . and 
the Stevenson's from Ontario visited with 
Isabel and John McArthur ... Bi- 
lingual is Gerry and Emil Shwetzer's 
paraket "Birdie" who speaks German 
and American . . . But "Tex" Sokoll, ; pet 
parakeet of the Al Sokoll's (AVP) won't 
have a thing to do with his repaired 
ladder . . . And did you know our Ro- 
berta Alberti sang a wonderful medley 
of Jerome Kerns songs at a luncheon of 
the Northeast Miami Woman's Club .„ . ^ 
and that Mabel Nielsen, Forrest's wife 
made a 97 in the State Board Nursing 
Exam and is now LPN'ing at Memorial 
Hospital!!* . . . It's wonderful having 



The Welcome Mat 



JO ANN BRODA— Bookkeeping . . . Born 
in Washington, D. C. Joan worked in, the 
Bookkeeping Departments of First Na- 
tional of Jersey City, N. J., and Airport 
Bank of Miami. Attends Church of the 
Visitation, likes target shooting, skin- 
diving^ fishing and swimming/ Colfects 
stamps, coins, maps, old records and 
antiques. 



JOAN LaBARBERArdBookkeeping .* . . 
Originally from. Queens, L. L, N. Y. 
Worked in the Bookkeeping Department 
and as a Savings Teller at First National 
City Bank of New York. Joan attends 
Gesu f Church; likes swimming. 



.NORMA CARDINAL^Loan . . . Comes 
from Boston, Mass. where she worked 
in the Billing Department of a hospital. 
Norma attends Reorganized Church of 
Jesus*Christ of Latter Day Saints. Likes 
bowling and swimming.. 



GLADYS HUMPHRIES— Loan , . . Home 
town is Brooklyn, N- Y. Gladys has been 
here since 1939, and has a local back- 
ground in Credit and Mortgages. Is mar- 
ried to Hugh; likes swimming. 



GLORIA VICK^Trust . , . Formerly an 
Executive Secretary in New York City, 
Vacations in Miami decided Gloria and 
husband Don to make their home here, 
with "Vickie" their Ten, 1st Prize Blue 
Ribbon Winner, Airedale. Att ends First 
Baptist Church; plays the piano; likes 
bowling and fishing. 



Inez Fasig well enough to be back with 
lis once more „ . . DEPARTMENTAL 
CHANGES— Bob Forbes from Teller to 
Assistant Head Teller, and John Mc- 
Arthur from Teller to Bookkeeping. 



XL 



personally speaking... 




If someone were to ask you "What is the greatest problem that faces the Free 
World Today", what would your answer be? The possibility of Nuclear War? 
Delinquency? Feeding the Poor? 



All of these things are important — but in my opinion, it is the Menace of World 
Communism! In this, I echo the statement of J. Edgar Hoover, a man of vast expe- 
rience with subversives who says, "Communism is the major menace of our time. 
Today, it threatens the very existence of our Western Civilization." 

It is a matter of record that if the Communist Party of America should ever assume 
control, its blueprint calls for the immediate elimination of one-third of the people 
in this nation. That means about 60 million Americans murdered. The remaining ones 
would then be "satisfied" with the "glorious benefits" derived from Communism. 

In spite of the menace of Communism, we continue to plan .for the? future — OUR 
KIND OF FUTURE — Johnny's education, the possibility of a new car, the room 
addition. That is a fine thing. But ... we still should be aware of, and informed 
about, the dangers of Communism. 

One of the best ways to become better informed about* Communism is to .read 
J. Edgar Hoover's, "Masters of Deceit". Reading it is an experience you will not 
forget. "Masters of Deceit" can be obtained at most hewstands at the cost of 
50 cents. This is a very modest sum to pay 'for an "insurance po[icy" on Freedom. 
As Mr. Hoover says, "Every citizen* has a duty to learn more about the menace that 
threatens his future, his home, his children, the peace of the world, ., . ." 

It is wonderful to be able to afford to feel that as long as America remains pros- 
perous and united, there is no imminent danger of Communist seizure of Power. 



But' . . ,. CAN we afford NOT to know, what 
it is that we must safeguard against? 
Of course not. 





ecu* 5 or 



OUTSTANDING SERVICE 




BANK 
NOTE 



OO0 




l/idtf, 1962. 




mm 



LITTLE RIVER BANK and TRUST COMPANY 

8017 NORTHEAST 2nd AVENUE 
MIAMI. FLORIDA 



BANK... 
NOTES 




Vol.5 



No. 4 



. . . Dedicated to Progress . , . Through 
Mutual Understanding and Apprecia- 
tion for each other* 

ADVISORY BOARD 

•DANIEL C. NORTHROP 
Vice President 

EDWIN M. GRAHAM 
Vice President 

* * * * 

EDITOR 
LYNN D. BROWNE 

* * * * 

STAFF 

Virginia Asbury 

Lorraine Auf ford 

Judith Kaufmann 

Mae Teubner 

, Dorothy Wallace 



fjea 




Member South Florida Industrial Editor* Association 

Southern Council Editors Association 

International Council 0/ Industrial Editors 



Contents 



About the Cover 



Have'You'Heard%.....vT7T....-....T i ^»^4. 

Baraket and Wilshear „... „.*.. 5 

The Welcome Mat .<,v„,..„v.„„..^. 6 

Happy Birthday ,-•. .„..v...v„w.,„...«*. 7 
Personally Speaking , v ,,Back Cover 



ABOUT THE COVER • • • 

"Cover Girl" is Judy Kaufmann, 
who takes care of Signature Con- 
trol. Read her story on page 3. 



SWAN GETS CERTIFICATE 







rtSrgfri* iaV 



Dick Swan displays the certificate he 
received for satisfactory completion of 
prescribed course of study. Swan at- 
tended the Trust Training School, spon- 
soredby the Trust Division of the Florida 
Bankers Association, at University of 
Florida, Gainesville,, for ii three year 
period of one-week lectures. 



J 



\\ 



Enthusiastic". . . is Judy Kaufmann 
About Signature Control 



Enthusiastic . . . is the word for Judith 
Ann Kaufmann, who projects this trait 
in her daily routine . . . and in her 
warm, friendly relationship with co- 
workers. 

Judy takes care of Signature Control, 
which in essence touches about every 
account in our bank. Signature Control 
may be likened to the post of a "watch- 
ful observer," According to Judy's super* 
visor, James V. Fagan, Assistant Secre- 
tary • . . Signature Control is actually 
the GZ or Intelligence Section regarding 
necessary data for our accounts. 

On newly opened Commercial Accounts 
. . . attached to the sheet containing 
authorized signatures which she receives 
from the New Accounts Department, is 
a history sheet. The "signature sheets 
contains the signatures of those author- 
ized to sign checks, mailing address, 
business seal* and date account is 
opened. 

The, History Sheet notes pertinent data 
such as former banking references, mail- 
ing address, date the account opened, 
name of the Officer who opened the ac- 
count, related accounts if any, whether 
the account was solicited or not, opening 
deposit, etcetera. 

Judy then transfers necessary informa- 
tion to the signature sheet, which is then 
filed in front of the Xedger Sheet in the 
Bookkeeping Department, and is used 
for account reference. She stressed that 
when typing this information, strict ad- 
herence must "be paid to form and' ac- 
curacy in which she takes personal 
pride. 

Personal Accounts, and Special Check- 
ing Accounts are treated similarly, with 
attention to accuracy and detail. 

Savings Accounts are filled out in the 
New Accounts Department and a refer- 
ence sheet is forwarded Jo Judy, with 
pertinent data. She stated that at times 



there is a considerable amount of check- 
ing necessary for accuracy, but that this 
is one of the things she likes about her 
work. She explained that in addition to 
verifying signatures, the sheet is 
stamped with a "Signature Verified" 
stamp . . . which indicates that the per- 
son or persons opening the account, had 
shown proper identification to the of- 
ficer in charge. This is done for purposes 
of account authenticity. 

An important facet of Judy's daily 
routine is a report which is a. composite 
of three separate types of account in- 
formation. The first is the New; Accounts 
Report which shows the name of the 
account according to Commercial, In- 
dividual, Special Checking, and Savings 
classification. It also includes opening 
dates, mailing addresses, and amounts 
of opening deposits. 

The second; is a comparison sheet 
which gives information and totals as 
of today, yesterday, one year ago today, 
and two years ago today. These are 
broken down into account classification 
showing number of accounts on ledger 
yesterday, the number of accounts 
opened today, number of accounts closed 
today, and comparison as of two years 
previous. 

The Closed Accounts Report, is similar 
to data included in the New Accounts 
Report— but in addition~~shows why the 
account was closed, and the amount on 
deposit at that time. 

Judy makes four copies of this com- 
posite report. The original is given to 
Addressograph-Mail Department for nee- 
cessary changes, and is then passed on 
to Analysis for their records. 

Copies are forwarded to the Trust 
Department, Business Development .De- 
partment, and circulated among Officers 
for their information. These reports play 
(Continued on Page A) 



have you heard.. 



As we go to press, sick list includes 
Raymond E s Morloek (SrVP), and Wal- 
ter W* Asmus (VP). Our best wishes 
to you both. Get well soon, we miss 
you . . .^ Vacations come and go thick 
and fast 'round this time' of the 
year, 'Twas an exciting European trip 
for Mr. and Mrs. Richard C« Boggs 
(Exec s VP&TO) who visited London, 
Paris, Lucerne, Madrid, Rome and re- 
spective countries . . . Annual return to 
their summer cottage in Augusta, Me. 
is anticipated by Mr. and Mrs. Lou 
(ATO) Bartlett . . . Carol and Dick Swan 
'n son Richard saw the family in Lees- 
burg . . . They planed to Gotham Town 
did Alice Peet and Mae Teubner, and 
then went by car to Canada . . . Long 
Island, N.Y. was destination of Caroline 
Curran and family . . . and it was Day- 
tona Beach for Winifred and Lou Lussiei* 
who met there with New Hampshire 
friends , . . Eve Stiefel stayed 'round 
town this year at a Beach motel with 
family , . . Elsie and Jack Wear took a 
cruise to Bxmini , . . and Rosemary 
O'Rourke was squired around Manhattan 
by Ernie Feniello while she visited rela- 
tives. Didn't someone say she hears from 
him daily? Hm-nvm ! . . . More Trips 'n 
Stuffy-Doris Pickerill toured Tennessee 
. . . Mary Jane and Bill Spahr vaca- 
tioned in Pittsburgh a . , Jean and Josh 
Marks relaxed at home and enjoyed their 
new Impala . . ■ When Dorothy Sweeney 
embarked on plane bound for New York 
to visit folks, husband Bill gifted hei 
with orchids . . * CAUTION . . , Don't 
do what Lynn Browne tried to do-HPay 
a grocery bill, with cafeteria tickets. It 
doesn't work \ I . , . ACHIEVEMENTS— 
Dianne Boldin daughter of Air. and Mrs 
Bernard E. (VP) Boldin was named 
"Outstanding Girl Sophomore" of her 
class at Miami Edison . . , Ceil Rose's 
son Michael graduated from Central 
High and is now working at wonderful 
job in town . • . Yvonne Henderson's 
sister Nadine is a June Grad of FSU , . . 
Yolie Cappolino's son "Butch" graduated 
from St. Rose of Lima, will attend Cur- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



(Continued from rage V) 

an important part in keeping officers of 
our bank in daily touch with account 
relationships. 

Judy in turn, takes the information she 
has compiled and, posts it in five dif- 
ferent books for future and permanent 
reference. From these figures Vr she com- 
piles a monthly report which is in turn 
forwarded, and included in our Monthly 
Volume Report for our Directors. 

There are many other details to her 
work which interests her, such as 
changes in account names, mailing ad- 
dresses, and signatures. Judy takes pride 
in keeping these changes up-to-date so 
that information on our signature sheets 
is current. 

Correspondence features in her duties 
too, as she contacts accounts where 
necessary information is incomplete 
and/or possibly confusing. She also sends 
letters in acknowledgment of changes 
made as requested by our customers. 
Follow-through is a most important fac- 
tor in attaining necessary data to com- 
plete the "information picture/' 

Once we have an established account, 
in many instances . . , changes of signa- 
ture, mailing address, and such items 
may be transacted by mail. This also 
falls in line with Judy's duties. 

♦Regardless of the amount of detail 
necessary for doing a thorough job in 
Signature Control, it "comes easy" to 
Judy Kaufmann, because she likes de- 
tail. When she came to our bank on 
July 17, 1958 she began in the Block 
Department, then transferred to Return 
Items. Judy feels that this experience 
has helped a great t deal in her under- 
standing of her present duties. 

Her work necessitates a considerable 
amount of typing which she admittedly 
enjoys. She is sincere in her desire for 
neatness and accuracy, and gets real 
pleasure out of comparison of figures. 
Her conscientiousness is apparent as she 
states, "There are many things to be 

(Continued on page 7) 



I 



'4 



Baraket and Wilshear Complete 
Three Years Intensive Studies 




Congratulation* ! 



Richard O. Boggs, Executive Vice 
President and Trust Officer con- 
gratulates John A. Wilshear, Jr., 
Secretary and Treasurer, center; 
and William Baraket, Vice Presi- 
dent and Trust Officer, right. 



A three year period of specialized banking courses was successfully 

completed in June 1962 at respective Universities, by William Baraket, 

Vice President and Trust Officer; and John A. Wilshear, Jr., Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Mr. Baraket specialized in Trust, at The Stonier Graduate School of 
Banking, Rutgers University, New Jersey. 

Mr. Wilshear specialized in Commercial Banking, at School of Bank- 
ing of the South, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

Both officers attended their respective Universities two weeks each 
year, during the three year period, and received top flight instruction in 
banking and related fields. Studies were continued through the year by 
means of extension problems 

Richard C. Boggs, Executive Vice. President and Trust Officer, who 
completed a course in Trust, at Stonier and graduated in 1947 stated, "It 
is no small honor for these men to have been chosen to attend these inten- 
sive training programs. Although the courses are extremely rigorous . . . 
and Graduation a time for rejoicing , . . the benefits far outweigh the time 
spent in study, for the men, as well as for the bank. Mr. Baraket and Mr. 
Wilshear deserve to be congratulated on their achievement." 



personally speaking... 




In 1958, the Communist Revolution in Russia was four decades behind us. But— 
when the Communist Party reached a peak in 1944 . . . of 80,000 in the United 
S^teiH* was stronger in numbers than the Soviet Parly was, at the time the Bolshe- 
viks seized control in Russia, in 1917. In 1931, Dimifrj Z. ManuHsky addressed 
students of the Lenin School of Political-Warfare, Moscow, USSR, saying, "War to 
the hilt between Capitalism and Communism is inevitable. Today, of course, we 
are not strong enough to attack. Our time will come in 20 to 30 years. In order 
to win, we shall need the element of surprise. The bourgeoisie will have to be put, 
to sleep so we shall begin by launching the most spectacular peace movement on 
record. There will be electrifying overtures and unheard of concessions. The capi- 
talist countries, stupid and decadent, will rejoice to cooperate in their own. destruc- 
tion. They will leap at another chance to be friends. As soon as their guard is down, 
we shall smash them with our clenched fist." (This was authenticated by a former 
sludenr'before .a. Congressional Committee.) The above statement is not to be taken 
lightly. While the Party member may physically reside in the United States, he 
"lives" in a Communist "world." Communists, firmly believe they are destined to 
conquer the world — and to that purpose they are dedicated. 



Although today we are a free nation, we cannot afford the luxury of waiting for 
Communism to run its course. In the words of J. Edgar Hoover, "The weapons of 
Communism are still formidable. They become even more effective when we lower 
our guard and when we become lax in strengthening our democratic institutions 
in perfecting the American dream." 

Mr. Hoover urges, us to recognize the "Five False Claims of Communism." It is impor- 
tant we remember that — Communists are NOT Liberals . . . Communists are NOT 
Progressives . . , Communists are NQT Social Reformers . . . Communists do NOT 
believe in Democracy . . .- COMMUNISTS ARE NOT AMERICANS! 



It is important, too, that we do not permit, the Communists to fool us into, becoming 
"innocent victims". It is important we know our enemy. How can this be accom- 
plished? Read^od Study! Learn for yourself. 
Don't put the complete burden of "knowing"rand 
"realizing"— on the other fellow. 

(Editors Note: ManuHsky quote reprinted by permission of Father Donal 
O'Mahony, The Cohmban Fathers, Nebraska.) 




35 Vie 




I 



eapd of 

OUTSTANDING SERVICE 







t? 



3-18-63 



airtel 



*«^-/0)O?7-, 



%* 



To: SAC, Seattle 
From: Director, VfSi 

\ ; d£ 

MR. 



*r* 



pULLMANJW^JHiligTQN 

RESEARCH (CORREJS^ONbENCiE, AND TOURS) 

&UDED 3-25-63 



be - 

b7C 



- Enclosed are two copies pi a self-explanatory 
ietter from captioned individual who 4s not. identifiable ihiBufiles. 

i — '. — - You should have a mature, experienced Agent contact 
Mr. acknowledge his letter and diplomatically obtain from 

him the name of the person to whomjhe wants to give the; autographed 
copy of "Masters of Deceit.-" When the name has been, obtained, ^ ^ 
conduct appropriate, inquiries to determine the reputation of the 
person for whom the book is intended. 

Submit. results, together with, recommendations, under 
above caption, to reach Bureau no later than 3-25^63/ 






Tplson *« 
Belmont - 

'Monr.,^ 
Casper L- 
Callahan. . 
Conrad _ 

_ DeCoach - 
Evans , 

Gai* ; 



Rosen « 
SuIUvan ,, 
tavel «_ 



Trotjer , , 
Tele. Room * 
Holmes — 
Candy. - _- 



Enclos 





Follow-up for >3«25«63: 
RWE:ricf (6) 



* 

^^^1^ yi 




^&f<<^T%^ 





3L 



t> 



\jL 



%& 



X* 



f r V 



March 11, 19^5 



i s M Tsi Tolson 
1 Mr. Belm<$ 
KMr^ohr 
iMxi Xas^er-J 

| S Hrr\ 
Mr. PS^ 
; Mr. Eyanj 
| Mr. Gale 
j Mr. Rosen — 
1 Mr. Sullivan 
i Mr. Tavel....- 
I Mr. Trotter- 
I Tele. Room 





Dear Mr* Hoover; 



a 



Would you as a 

of Deceits if it was 

""Wis book and others 



favor autograph your wonderful book, Mas±e£s_ 
sent to you? My associates and I are giving 

to a friend in Seattle, Washington for his 

birthday. He is interested in Law and Politics, and we felt it 
would serve as an incentive to continue. gg 

We at Washington State University realize of what impofH 
ance a law making and enforcing body, as well as other forms *af 
politics, is to the people of the United States of America. **££ 
return address is: ~**~ 






Mr. 

421 Goldsworthy 

Washington State University 

Pullman, Washington 






Your reply and autograph would be greatly appreciated* I 
------ j recieve your reply* Thank you 






he 

b7C 



will send the book as soon as 
very jmeh for your time*. 
















f fcr.-" 




> 
CD 

en 



if 

6' * 



Sincerely Yours, " 



JITAPR'I »» 



6V 



oi 






-- -*.- 



~v~* 











>& 



March 28, 1963 



^ 42 ~/6<fj>7j ~a?fJ 



r 



^L 



Mr. l 

421 Golds wort hy ~ 
w5shtn^ton.St9.te i U niversity 
FftEmian, Washington 



bo 
b7C 



^g--wmw 'I " r >y 



«****. 



Dear Mr 



Upon my return to the city I received your 
letter of March 11th. 

With respect to^your inquiry, you should 
feel free to send your copy of ^Masters of Deceit" to me,^ 
and I will be glad to autograph it. " 

Sincerely yours, 



m 



m 
rn 






to 

CD 



rn 
<^> 
o 

rn 

o 



Q-Edgaciloovec 



o 
o 

X 



-# 



b6 
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4 




WAR2 & 1983 

CQ MM»FB[ 

1 - Seattle (94-308) 

Reurairtel 3-22-63 
NOTE: Inasmuch .as. Buttles contained nojthing identifiable with correspondent 
and; the' identity of, the person to whom he was going to give the book was not 
known, an airtel was sent to SAC, Seattle, on 3 ri£- 63= with, instructions to 
acknowledge his letter by personal contact and obtain the name of the person 
for vrtiom the book is intended. Appropri ate inquiries wereithen to'be smade. 

SAG advised. the book, b to be.giy en to Mr.| | 

Correspondent advised f" | is interested in politics and history and is a 



" Tolson . 
Belmont . 
Uohi\ 
='Casplt 
palloh 
Coiuad'i. 
DeLoacH 
Evans 
Goie 
Rosen 
Sullivan , 
Tavel 
Tiottet 



great admhagtv of the^mector and the FBI. 

reflect ajiy^erogafory information conce.riL ..„ ... „.. ,-._ ;r -_ 

\r§£^me/nded the Director comply with the request?* fe/ *cS 



Appropriate inquiries failed, to 
ormation concerning the persons involved, and SAC 

_" : i :„.j.i- !_£_ =?** it- l'i? Lfi :' - 







Tele. Room . 
Holmes , 
Gandy\ 



TELETYPE^ UNIT 



4^ 



t 



(Rev. 12-13-S6) 



cP 



<p 



FBI 



Transmit the following in 



PLAIN TEXT 



Date: 3/22/63 



Via 



..AlRTEL 



(Type in plain text or code) 

AIR MAIL ._ 



(Priority or Method" of Mailing) 



TO : 
FROM : 
SUBJECT: 



DIRECTOR, FBI 

SAC, SEATTLE (9^-308) 

MR, | 

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON 

RESEARCH (CORRESPONDENCE AND TOURS) 

Re Bureau alrtel, 3/18/63. 




4 



, . la a first-year student; at Washington 

State university, puiiman, Washington, address - Room 421, 
Goldswqrthy Hall, His home address is 5515 West Winthrop 
Stree t, Seattle, Washington. I l is going with a girl 

.named! | has .a brother, I ~ I 

i vino Uvea w ith hi a parents, Mr7~ana MrsT"~ 



Seafefei^-J!fes.W.ngton v , 



at Pfifio- «^frhh' g-h^pet 's outhwest . 



| has a. birthday; 

and inasmuch as he is -greatigr'interest.ecr in, politics and in 
hlnftn-hy a nd ia a great adm ire* of the Direptor and the FBI, 
andj Ithought he would greatly appreciate 



t 



an autographed copy of the Director's book for a birthday 
present. 



Seattle indices and normal sources co 
identifiable derogatory information concerning I 



c ontain no 



'be 

b7C 



V 

W b6 

b7C 



i Seatt le rues ana, pupae sourcesi nformation 

available regardlng l I indicate that 

in 1959 and i960, he organized citizens groups and' inaugurated 
legal actions in an effort to remove judge WILLIAM 'H. SIMMONS 



ifjy- Bureau **rv 

^-^2- - Seattle A ,-*> ^ 

CCC:kel JUT 

(5) 




£& 



, ^ 











1963 



fe gr 



i 



Approved: 







Sent 



.M Per 




Special Agent .in Charge 



J" 











SE 94-3Q8 



from his position as- Seattle Traffic Court Judges -He raised 
money for this purpose and eventually: made "publib accounting 
for -the funds. He alleged immoral conduct on ;the part of 
the judge, and .claimed that graft, and corruption aiso existed 
in connection with his handling, qt *he, -Traffic court.- The 
suits were, not successful, although Judge SIMONS was . sub- 
sequently removed in connection i with ;his co nvict ion (later- 
reve rsed);' of a felony, ;* This tended to mak£< 



1 a oohtrpversial figjira in Seattle ..during ~ rnese years.* 
Is a manufacturer .of; flags $ &nd sinek the abotte-raetitione 



He- 
suit s> has apparently not been* in the public eye. 



be . 

b7C 



in* the ftha priQfe of de-ppgatofu 'informat ion and because 

] for the 



of the admiration of . . 

Director and the FBIj it is recommended tnat the a utographe d 
copy 6f the "MASTERS' OF DECEIT" be. furnished to M{ 



-2- 






Q 














♦ 



£*- /*¥*>1?* 2l?/^~ 



ApriiS, 1963 



- fc 



Mamaaa 
APR2M963 

"COMM.FBI . 



'^V 




^tJjfiril^rdiCpnSpansu 
IiPxUlaiid^Building— 
200 ..^sUKncUfapet 
New York 17jJ^w/X£rk^ 



Dear Mr* 



It was Vhpttghtf ul of you to write 

on [March 20th and. to^comment so kindly about 

my book, "Masters of Deceit fl Thank, ypu jor 

your courtesy. ". 

Sincerely yours, 
& Edgar Hoover 




b6 -ziS 



S 



O^ 1 




T^fl I*/ . p rf , H (Correspondence to ,him as "Deai[ 
5 HF V ^* b "^Edgar." On ;3/l 5/63 a n auto graphed copy of "Masters , Of 
T ° lso ^--'— ; XJeceit" was furn ished tot | ih response :to his .request' £*x3 

; t 9j -for transmittal tcj "j^ft^ 3*%^ 



NOTE! No record of f | in^Bufiles> Mr; __ 

is on the Special Correspondent s 1 List* The Director addresses 

\ and signs his letter 



,8elripnr 
Mohr^— 

Cqspe't » 
CoUahcn \ 



" Evans ^ — J^ .!«:-. -- _ 

<jale"i .,.' — 



*3W 
RMW:alk 



Hosen '*— — 
SuHIvan'^-, 
Tavel «^i 
Trottet _1 
Teler Hoom 
Holmes A- 
Garitfy _ 




'*Wi© 



|p APR TT963 

* — II MAILHOOM CZ3 XELETYPE^UNItQ- 




f*M *** 



DIRECTOR OP 
iNTERNATiONAL OPERATIONS 









200 East Forty- second Strbet 
Nbw York 17, N. Y. 



Mar 




Mr. Casper.. 
Mr. Callahan 
M^a Conrad 

Evans„ 

Mr, Gale 

Mr. Rosen— 
Mr. Sullivan 
Mr. Tavel„ 
Mr. Trotter- 
Tele. Room— 



b6 
b7C 



a-/. 



/V 



Mr, J, Edgar Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Justice 
9th & Pa* Ave*, N* W, 
Washington 25, D* C. 

Dear Mr* Hoover: 



Our mutual friend, Mr.|_ 



«23 






i [ of the Defense SupplV 

•^Association, has sent me an autographed copy of your book?, 
^MASTERS OF DECEIT . 



re 



I certainly want to express my sincere appreciation foi^ 
this book, which will have an honored place in my home "~* 
library* 

Cordially*- 




GHW/srr 



* 



^ 




he 

b7C 




m-^dz^/^z??^ zP^ 



a1WffilaJ363 




6 







April 12, 1983 



bo 
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Box2U~ 



N^ 



"Y 



^^Mls^W^htagts^ 



DearMr[ 



Senator Warren G. BkgnUson has advised me 
of your desire, for information on communism* and it & a 
pleasure to enclose some material on this subject for your 
use. | 

JCn vtercr of your interest,, younaay also want 
to read my books, ^i^^rsMJiBC^ and "A Stu^jf of 
Communism, M which should be available in your local public 
library* 

Sincerely yours, 





3=» 


"*1 U 


X) 




^ ^^i. 


S3 

o 

o 

MM 





"-MAltsoe- 



0- Edgac Hoover 



mi 21963 



COMNl-FFl 



losures (5) See Next Page 



V 



M, 



en 



c6 






;t Honorable Warren G. Magnuson - (Sent with letter to Mai 
v Unit^a^t^tes Senate -4-12^63) £ i 



us on dated 



/ ibf Washington 25, D* C* 






-tfr 

See Note NeSt Page 
•l 



***k0 





V * " J 



! 19 APR 




1963 



MAIL ROOM 



□ 



TELETYPE UNIT 



□ 



1? 



6 



Q 



Mr, 



bo " 
b7C 



BllCl00U7C3 (G) 

Statement 03 Communism 

Communist illusion and, Democratic Beauty 

Commmiist Party, U3A, (Ave I.5aria) 

Tee Current Communist Threat 

Tii0 Communist JPartjr I4aO 



HQEE:, Ca the afternoon of 4-10-G3, arcpreseMntivQcf Senator &fagnuson r a 
Office telcpaoaicaHy contacted £a\ Leiabaagk ia $3rv DO Lgach^s Offi ce 
and requested tfeat material oa communism be cent to Mr[ ' 



v?ith a brief cover letter and thai a eo>y of the letter be sent to 
Senator iSa^uScn's Office. Tfie director coasratulatcd ^Sicnusqa oa 
Ms re-election to th e Senate oa 11*7-62. Bafilcs reflect no iafonnatioa 
identifiable trith,!&* 



be 

b7C 



-2- 



f 




1 



i 






ft 



HEADQUARTERS 



[ jir , P JJ ' ■? ] I DEPARTMENT OF THE ARM Y 

"nflCE OF THE CHIEF OF SUPPORT SERVICE* 
'"'', WASHINGTON 25, D.C. 



feMW 



I 



IN MM.Y REFH TO 



10 Apri 




/ 



Mr. Callahan . 

Mr.Sff|5Lbac 
Mr$Evans,™ 
Mr. Gal©«~« 
Mr. Rosen.^ 
Mr. Sullivan, 
Mr. Tavel 



Mr. Trotter^., 
Tole. Koonu«^ 
Miss Holmes^, 



I have just received 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Dear Mr. Hoover, 

Through the good offices of Mr 

o 

the copy of M&STBRS OF DK CKT T . w hich you were good^enough to autograph * 
and send to me. 

The book is one that I want to retain permanently in my library — a cx> 
truly authoritative documentation of a^ problem with which we all must 
be intelligently informed. " 5? 

I shall treasure the volume, not only because of its valuable rv- 
message but because it bears your signature. Thank you so "very much-. 

7) ~ 

Sincerely yours, J *™ 






«a. 



\ «-,-v 








\) 



t wi n m i m*m**mmm#*ummum i e i 



L. 



. jM ! < 



Ignel, 0^ ^-/g/^-7 7 -J VH 

Gtiiet o£ support Services __ ^ - « r ■ ' 

'.? OT* t&Wpfr I APR JST 1963 . , ^ 



22195a 




\ft\~fJ 









AprU 15, 1963' 



1 V '-^, 



2-f/S 



<A Mr, 
lV 2525 



_ Hea dland , Drive 
East ^int, - ^Geqrgja^ 



Dear Mr* 



I have received your letter of April 9th and appre- 
ciate the interest prompting you to communicate with me. 

In connection with your desire to obtain publications 
mentioned in "Masters of Deceit'; you may be able to locate this 
material at your local public library or order it with the assistance 
of your librarian. 

Enclosed is a list of those organizations which have 
been designated by the Department of Justice pursuant to Executive 
Order 10450. I am also sending some other literature 1 hope will 
be of interest to you. 

Sincerely yours, 



be 

b7C 



4- 7t 



U£ 



Tolson.— 
Belmont _ 
Mohi__ 
Casper _ 
Callahan . 
Conrad _ 
DeLoach , 
Evans ^_ 
Gale - 



MAILED. 31 

APR H 1363 

C0MM-F3J 



John Edgar Hoover 
Director 



Enclosures (5) 

List of Subversive Organizations 

Young People Can Help Defeat Communism 

Time of Testing 

The Story of the FBI 

Know your FBI y. 

NOTE: A Cdrresj>onderit'£an$oTbe identified in Bufiles. 

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April 9, 1963 



J« Edgar Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington 25, D«G» 

My dear Mr. Hoover: 

I am a high school student seeking information on the activities 
of the Cormiunist party and other subversive organizations in the 
^United States. My history class has finished reading your "book 
^— ^ii-lasters of Deceit" ... and we fo&nd that it mentions several pub- 
lications in the text. I wondered if you could tell me where I 
m*ght obtain copies of these publications, particulary the "Daily 
Worker" • 






I would also appreciate a list of all the subversive organizations 



active ? n the United States. Thank you very much. 

Yours very siricerlv. 



Qua 



2525 Headland Drive 
East point, Georgia 



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date: April 16, 1963 



R ♦ - H ♦ ~ Hay ne^^I 

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"MASTERS OF DECEIT" 



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Callahan , 
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Mr. Stephen Jt^firi llo, D4r.e.c.tjor«.ojL.Administrative 
Serjrtc^^NatjJna^^ ^ 

requested that the Director, if possible, autograph the enclosed' 
copy of "Masters of Deceit." £,,£ 

Mr. Grillo has long been an admirer of the Director and 
the FBI. He worked closely, with FBI Agents while assigned to the 
House Appropriations Committee Investigative Staff during 1951 and 
1952 and has maintained a continuing contact since that time. He 
is a leader in local American Legion activities. 

m Mr!:. Grillo recently suffered a. cerebral spasm and will be 
confined to bed for the next thirty days. 

,-,•■ »— 

*-- Bureau files contain no derogatory information concerning 
Grillojgrhe has- always been cooperative with the Bureau Liaison 
representative and it is believed that a book autographed by 
th^pirector #guld do much to lift his spirits 






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Refer to Crime Research Section for handling. 






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1- - Crime Research Section 
1 - Liaison 
1 r Mr. Haynes 

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53 APR 24 1963